Port of Los Angeles: New Website Provides Close-Up Look At Port Of Los Angeles Marine Habitats, Wildlife

Port of Los Angeles: New Website Provides Close-Up Look At Port Of Los Angeles Marine Habitats, Wildlife. “As part of ongoing efforts to promote a deeper understanding of the diverse habitats of Los Angeles Harbor, the Port of Los Angeles has unveiled an educational website showcasing the abundant marine life thriving above and below Port waterways…. The LA Harbor Habitats site creates a visual and three-dimensional representation of marine life at the Port, providing users with various ways to explore the trade gateway’s biology, including by habitat—from the shore to seafloor. Underwater videos, interactive games and stunning photography of the undersea world of the Port add to the experience.”

NOAA: NOAA showcases new mapping tool for marine species

NOAA: NOAA showcases new mapping tool for marine species. “NOAA Fisheries is launching a new tool to better track the location and movement of marine fish in U.S. waters. The Distribution Mapping and Analysis Portal reveals that the ranges of many marine species are shifting, expanding and contracting in response to changing ocean conditions. The interactive website will improve data sharing and collaboration, facilitate decision-making about fishery management and science and increase overall knowledge of species distribution for stock assessments.”

Geographic: Social media is providing crucial data to study and monitor marine species

Geographic: Social media is providing crucial data to study and monitor marine species . “Visitors to the stretch of coastline from Donegal to Antrim, Northern Ireland, are often treated to the sight of bottlenose dolphins leaping from the sea surface. Pictures of their acrobatics accrue thousands of likes on social media, but amateur photographers are often unaware that their images are generating powerful data.”

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps. “On Sept. 8, the Allen Coral Atlas met a major milestone by completing global habitat maps of the world’s tropical, shallow coral reefs. A combination of satellite imagery, advanced analytics and global collaboration has resulted in maps that show the marine ecosystems’ benthic and geomorphic data in unprecedented detail. With eyes in the sky, the technology recognizes geomorphic, or seascape structures, up to about 15 meters (52 feet) underwater and benthic data, or the composition of the ocean floor, up to about 10 meters (33 feet) underwater.”

DTU Aqua: Photo posts reveal huge interest for real coastal nature

DTU Aqua: Photo posts reveal huge interest for real coastal nature. “Tourists are generating more social media attention about marine protected areas than about other neighbouring coastal areas. In those protected areas they focus more on nature as such, wildlife or wild landscapes, whereas photos from nearby, ‘control’, coastal zones are more focused on human infrastructure like roads, trains, restaurants as well as cultural and historical sites….The photographers also described their photos taken in marine protected areas in a more positive manner than those taken outside MPAs. The social media followers viewing photos of those experiences liked and commented more on MPA photos than they did for non-MPA photos.”

Daily Express (Malaysia): UMS students build whale shark database

Daily Express (Malaysia): UMS students build whale shark database. “Marine biology students at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) have been taking advantage of the Movement Control Order (MCO) to start building a database of whale shark sightings in Malaysia including using divers’ posts on social media. The travel restrictions brought on by the outbreak of coronavirus left the students unable to travel to survey sites such as Pulau Gaya where they recorded and identified their first official whale shark of the project, MY-065, on a survey just five days before the MCO was declared on Mar 13.”

James Cook University: New global database to guide coral restoration

James Cook University: New global database to guide coral restoration. “Coral restoration projects typically focus on reintroducing coral to areas where coral reefs are degraded or lost. Common strategies include attaching small fragments of coral, reintroducing baby coral, or stabilising the material coral grows on. Dr Boström-Einarsson was part of an international team of scientists that looked at 362 case studies on active coral restoration spanning four decades in 56 countries. The researchers developed a database to document case studies of coral restoration from around the world.”

Phys .org: Updated shark tagging atlas provides more than 50 years of tagging and recapture data

Phys .org: Updated shark tagging atlas provides more than 50 years of tagging and recapture data. “This new atlas updates an earlier version covering 1962 to 1993 and adds information on 22 species. Detailed profiles are provided for 14 shark species, including bull and tiger sharks and smooth dogfish. The updated data significantly extended their known ranges and movements.”

On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’ (Phys .org)

Phys .org: On the edge between science and art: Historical biodiversity data from Japanese ‘gyotaku’. “Historical biodiversity data is being obtained from museum specimens, literature, classic monographs and old photographs, yet those sources can be damaged, lost or not completely adequate. That brings us to the need of finding additional, even if non-traditional, sources….In Japan many recreational fishers have recorded their memorable catches as ‘gyotaku’, which means fish impression or fish rubbing in English. ‘Gyotaku’ is made directly from the fish specimen and usually includes information such as sampling date and locality, the name of the fisherman, its witnesses, the fish species (frequently its local name), and fishing tackle used.”

From Neal Agarwal: The Deep Sea

Big thanks to Shirl K. for this one — The Deep Sea. There’s not really a description I can quote from. It’s an illustration of the sea. You keep scrolling down and down while the page shows you some creatures who live at that depth. You keep going lower, and lower, and even when you think you’re at the end you’re not. I think it’s the physical act of scrolling that “makes it click,” when it comes to understanding just how deep the ocean is. Highly recommended.

Phys .org: Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the ‘Japan pig’ seahorse in Taiwan

Phys .org: Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the ‘Japan pig’ seahorse in Taiwan. “While monitoring of cryptic and elusive tiny creatures, such as pygmy seahorses that measure only 13 to 27 mm, might be too costly and time-consuming for research teams and institutions, the underwater activity might be proving of particular interest to photography and diving enthusiasts. At least, this is what comes across from the recent reports of five miniature species identified from Taiwanese waters by local citizen scientists and passed along via Facebook and Instagram.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”