Phys .org: Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance

Phys .org: Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance. “An online mapping and knowledge platform prototype could soon offer free and easily accessible information on the migratory patterns of endangered species in the ocean. The Migratory Connectivity in the Ocean (MiCO) system has been launched by The University of Queensland’s Dr. Daniel Dunn.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?. “The United Nations organisation [International Seabed Authority (ISA)] headquartered in Kingston, Jamaica, is charged with promoting the mining of the ocean floor while, contradictorily, ensuring its protection. That’s about to change. As the ISA meets this month to draft regulations to allow mining to begin, it is set to unveil a public database that contains all environmental data reported by the miners since 2001. For the first time, scientists will be able to analyse the quantity and quality of that information and determine if mining contractors have complied with ISA rules.”

Imperial College London: Marine ‘biodiversity crisis’ tackled with new database of conservation plans

Imperial College London: Marine ‘biodiversity crisis’ tackled with new database of conservation plans. “… researchers led by James Cook University, Imperial College London and the University of Maine have taken the first step towards a global repository by launching a database of marine conservation plans. A description of the database is published today in Biological Conservation.”

UC Magazine: Diving deep for data (Marine Biodiversity Photography)

University of Cincinnati Magazine: Diving deep for data. “Paleobiologist David Meyer took his first underwater photograph in 1967, the year he got into diving…. Fifty years later, Meyer has accumulated a library of images documenting marine species around the world to understand the ancient ones from the Ordovician Period 450 million years ago that he studied as a geologist in the McMicken College of Arts and Sciences. Now Meyer is sharing his life’s work with the public in UC’s digital repository for scholarly works, Scholar@UC. He is converting his old photographic slides to digital images for UC’s new Global Marine Biodiversity Archive.” There isn’t a lot in the archive yet, but enough that I’m looking forward to seeing what gets added.