Geographic: Social media is providing crucial data to study and monitor marine species

Geographic: Social media is providing crucial data to study and monitor marine species . “Visitors to the stretch of coastline from Donegal to Antrim, Northern Ireland, are often treated to the sight of bottlenose dolphins leaping from the sea surface. Pictures of their acrobatics accrue thousands of likes on social media, but amateur photographers are often unaware that their images are generating powerful data.”

WWLP: New tool maps birds, fish in offshore wind areas

WWLP: New tool maps birds, fish in offshore wind areas. “While federal and state officials eagerly pursue a rapid and significant deployment of offshore wind turbines to generate cleaner power along the East Coast, scientists and advocates on Wednesday unveiled a new mapping tool designed to give developers, regulators and the public a better sense of the natural resources below the surface in the neighborhood of proposed wind projects.”

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps

Arizona State University: ASU center announces first-ever global coral reef maps. “On Sept. 8, the Allen Coral Atlas met a major milestone by completing global habitat maps of the world’s tropical, shallow coral reefs. A combination of satellite imagery, advanced analytics and global collaboration has resulted in maps that show the marine ecosystems’ benthic and geomorphic data in unprecedented detail. With eyes in the sky, the technology recognizes geomorphic, or seascape structures, up to about 15 meters (52 feet) underwater and benthic data, or the composition of the ocean floor, up to about 10 meters (33 feet) underwater.”

Maine Public Radio: In Fight Over Right Whales And Lobster Fishery, All Sides Want To Know More About Whale Activity Off Maine

Maine Public Radio: In Fight Over Right Whales And Lobster Fishery, All Sides Want To Know More About Whale Activity Off Maine. “Last month, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration created a new website that maps almost two decades of work to detect whales off the east coast, via ‘passive acoustic’ recorders set on buoys, on submerged platforms, and on underwater gliders that can zig and zag around the Gulf of Maine for months at a time.”

Guam Ecosystems Collaboratorium for Corals and Oceans Biorepository: Biorepository receives coral collection from UOG professor emeritus

Guam Ecosystems Collaboratorium for Corals and Oceans Biorepository: Biorepository receives coral collection from UOG professor emeritus. “The Guam EPSCoR Guam Ecosystems Collaboratorium (GEC) Biorepository is welcoming its largest addition yet – a private collection of around 30,000 coral specimens from University of Guam Professor Emeritus of Marine Biology Richard Randall. The collection includes specimens from Guam and other places throughout the Pacific and reflects the 56 years since Randall joined the UOG Marine Laboratory, which he spent researching coral reef biology and geology.”

Cape Cod shark archive: See where great white sharks go the most each year (Boston Herald)

Boston Herald: Cape Cod shark archive: See where great white sharks go the most each year. “The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy has launched an online archive that reveals where hundreds of great white sharks have visited along the Cape each year. The new online tool, called the ‘White Shark Logbook,’ helps people see the historical detection data for tagged white sharks along Cape Cod. The White Shark Logbook provides users with data from 2010 to 2020, while the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy’s Sharktivity app is for real-time sighting and detection data.”

EurekAlert: Forty years of coral spawning captured in one place for the first time

EurekAlert: Forty years of coral spawning captured in one place for the first time. “Led by researchers at Newcastle University, UK, and James Cook University, Australia, the Coral Spawning Database (CSD) for the first time collates vital information about the timing and geographical variation of coral spawning. This was a huge international effort that includes over 90 authors from 60 institutions in 20 countries.”

Narwhals could be at high risk of catching COVID-19: researcher (The Narwhal)

The Narwhal: Narwhals could be at high risk of catching COVID-19: researcher. “Frozen tissue samples from a narwhal harvested by Inuit subsistence hunters will soon arrive at a laboratory in Boston, where researchers will work to determine whether the species could be susceptible to COVID-19. At the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, scientists will expose live narwhal cells to SARS-CoV-2 to determine if the virus that causes COVID-19 can latch onto the cells and cause a potentially lethal infection.”

Watching over whales: Online tool detects whales and ships in California’s Santa Barbara Channel in near real-time (University of Washington)

University of Washington: Watching over whales: Online tool detects whales and ships in California’s Santa Barbara Channel in near real-time. “Whale Safe combines several technologies: an underwater acoustic system that automatically detects whale calls; near real-time forecasts of whale feeding grounds; and whale sightings by scientists reported through a mobile app. These sources of information are combined into a daily ‘Whale Presence Rating’ on the Whale Safe website — an indicator that describes the likelihood of whales from ‘low’ to ‘very high.’”

Paradise regained then lost: Med mammals mourn lockdown end (AFP)

AFP: Paradise regained then lost: Med mammals mourn lockdown end. “When Europeans retreated into their homes to observe strict stay-at-home rules to contain the coronavirus, dolphins and whales on the Mediterranean coast basked and thrived in a hitherto unknown calm. But the return of tourists, noisy boats and heavy sea transport with the end of lockdowns in France and other Mediterranean littoral countries has signalled the return of danger and harm caused by human activity for underwater creatures.”

Daily Express (Malaysia): UMS students build whale shark database

Daily Express (Malaysia): UMS students build whale shark database. “Marine biology students at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) have been taking advantage of the Movement Control Order (MCO) to start building a database of whale shark sightings in Malaysia including using divers’ posts on social media. The travel restrictions brought on by the outbreak of coronavirus left the students unable to travel to survey sites such as Pulau Gaya where they recorded and identified their first official whale shark of the project, MY-065, on a survey just five days before the MCO was declared on Mar 13.”