University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

The Irish News: Citizen scientists track humpback whale travels with help of social media

The Irish News: Citizen scientists track humpback whale travels with help of social media . “Humpback whales are known to make vast migrations between their breeding and feeding grounds, and are increasingly being seen in UK seas. Now the first ever confirmed record of a UK-sighted whale hundreds of miles away in its summer feeding grounds in the high Arctic has been revealed, after its picture was spotted on Facebook by volunteer ‘citizen scientists’.”

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time. “Invisible to the naked eye, the health and movement of marine microbes that drift as part of the plankton is difficult to picture even for scientists – let alone everyday citizens. This challenge, to visualise the range of conditions that drifting marine microbes encounter, brought a group of expert scientists and visual designers together on a path to create the online citizen science project Adrift. Adrift is a portal that connects the public with the lives of microscopic marine microbes as they are propelled around the globe by ocean currents, with temperature and nutrient availability changing along the way.”

Phys .org: New website for tracking marine heatwaves

Phys .org: New website for tracking marine heatwaves. “In order to better understand the impacts to the ocean, Dr. [Eric] Oliver co-organizes an international working group to observe marine heatwaves through an interactive website. The website allows users to click on any location in the global ocean and see the history of marine heatwaves from current day back to 1982.”

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos . “Hoping that underwater photographers will be moved to contribute their images to form the ultimate marine-life database is a new Spanish-based online platform called the Sealife Collection. The initiative is being run in partnership with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), which ‘provides the taxonomic backbone to the database and daily updates to the taxonomy’, according to Sealife Collection’s Director Bernat Garrigós.”

Cision: Government of Canada Makes it Easier for Canadians to Learn about Aquatic Species at Risk (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision: Government of Canada Makes it Easier for Canadians to Learn about Aquatic Species at Risk (PRESS RELEASE). “Fisheries and Oceans Canada has updated and improved its online aquatic species at risk mapping tool. The improved interactive mapping tool allows Canadians to find out where aquatic species at risk and their critical habitat are located across Canada. The tool is now interactive, user-friendly and intuitive. Users can zoom in and out on the data and save their results.”

Atlas Obscura: You Can Now Eavesdrop on Orcas on Your Computer

Atlas Obscura: You Can Now Eavesdrop on Orcas on Your Computer . “An internet app called OrcaSound allows citizen scientists to livestream the ocean sounds of the Pacific Northwest from anywhere in the world, to help gather data about the resident killer whales and their environs. Scott Veirs, the project’s lead researcher, said that hydrophones (underwater microphones) have been in place off Washington’s San Juan Island since the mid-2000s, capturing the submarine goings-on and bringing them to listeners in a rudimentary form. The app relaunched recently, and now offers real-time streaming, as well as sounds from an all-new hydrophone station off Whidbey Island, just to the southeast of the the older ones.”