The National: Forgotten ‘ghost signs’ of Glasgow mapped by new project

The National: Forgotten ‘ghost signs’ of Glasgow mapped by new project. “THEY are faded fragments of days gone by which offer a glimpse into city life of the past. Now a project working to preserve the ‘ghost signs’ remaining on buildings in Glasgow is launching a map of key sites in the South Side. Since 2018, Glasgow City Heritage Trust has been researching and documenting the remains of the signs, which has included putting together an online archive, a conference and walking trails.”

Search Engine Journal: How to Successfully Promote Your Facebook Page Everywhere

Search Engine Journal: How to Successfully Promote Your Facebook Page Everywhere. “Today, we’re going to hone your Facebook skills. If you’re not already promoting your Facebook page and you run a business, you need to start. Facebook isn’t just a site for friends to stay in touch anymore. Many utilize it to search for basic information about companies before they make a purchase. That’s why it’s essential that you learn to promote your Facebook Page where and whenever possible.”

Bloomberg: Who Runs Twitter’s @Twitter?

Bloomberg: Who Runs Twitter’s @Twitter?. “For most of its existence, the company used its formal Twitter accounts the way you’d expect a large, public-facing company to use its Twitter accounts. Tweets were long, and the language was formal. Then in late 2018, the company adopted a more conversational approach. Twitter’s tweets got shorter and wittier. They were suddenly topical, and sometimes downright funny. Twitter took on a voice that was noticeably self-aware, as was the case with Fleets.”

NewsWise: Individualistic COVID-19 vaccine messages had best effect in US study

NewsWise: Individualistic COVID-19 vaccine messages had best effect in US study. “The study… tested messages on nearly 400 participants from across the United States in July 2020 before COVID-19 vaccines were available—and before misinformation on them was widespread. The researchers also found that ‘loss’ framing, highlighting the potential health problems from not getting a vaccine, was slightly more effective than the positive ‘gain’ framing that stresses the benefits.”

Wired: Deepfakes Are Now Making Business Pitches

Wired: Deepfakes Are Now Making Business Pitches. “Some partners at EY, the accounting giant formerly known as Ernst & Young, are now testing a new workplace gimmick for the era of artificial intelligence. They spice up client presentations or routine emails with synthetic talking-head-style video clips starring virtual body doubles of themselves made with AI software—a corporate spin on a technology commonly known as deepfakes.”

Gizmodo: Warner Bros. Lets Anyone Be in Its Reminiscence Trailer With a Cool New Deepfake Generator

Gizmodo: Warner Bros. Lets Anyone Be in Its Reminiscence Trailer With a Cool New Deepfake Generator. “As reported by Protocol, to promote its upcoming movie Reminiscence, Warner Bros. partnered with AI face platform D-ID to create a deepfake generator that allows anyone to insert themselves one of the film’s trailers. Using the generator is simple. All you need to do is go to movie’s official website and upload a picture of yourself. The generator will then crank out a short trailer that includes a moving deepfake sequence of your face.”

Bloomberg: Using Artificial Intelligence to Sniff Out Corporate Greenwashers

Bloomberg: Using Artificial Intelligence to Sniff Out Corporate Greenwashers. “Barely a day goes by without a company talking up their green credentials–how they’re aligning themselves with global climate goals, cutting waste and upping their recycling. With all this corporate happy-talk about saving the planet on the rise, so are concerns about greenwashing. Investors and regulators are increasingly sounding the alarm about companies that exaggerate or misrepresent their environmental bona fides. That’s what prompted academics at University College Dublin to develop algorithms to help the financial services sector detect and quantify greenwashing.”

AdAge: Tiktok Takes Gold For Olympic Sponsors

AdAge: Tiktok Takes Gold For Olympic Sponsors. “Olympic sponsors shelling out $3.3 billion to participate in the Tokyo Games have had to contend with the uncertainty around COVID-19, lack of in-person spectators, lagging TV viewership and absence of some high-profile athletes. But one bright spot in an otherwise chaotic Summer Games has been ByteDance’s short-form video app TikTok, which has become the app du jour to reach Gen Zers.”

Reebok: Reebok’s “Courting Greatness” AR Tool, Campaign Empowers Players to Create Basketball Courts Anywhere

Reebok: Reebok’s “Courting Greatness” AR Tool, Campaign Empowers Players to Create Basketball Courts Anywhere. “Central to the campaign is a digital tool that utilizes augmented reality to help players map out court features anywhere – on walls, fences, parking lots and alleyways. Throughout the season, to inspire creativity and build awareness around the tool, Reebok will work with local artists in major cities to construct playable basketball art installations, with the first coming from NYC creative collective New York Sunshine that will honor the upcoming Question Mid ‘Iverson Four’.”

Scientific Data: The Upworthy Research Archive, a time series of 32,487 experiments in U.S. media

Scientific Data: The Upworthy Research Archive, a time series of 32,487 experiments in U.S. media . “This archive records the stimuli and outcome for every A/B test fielded by Upworthy between January 24, 2013 and April 30, 2015. In total, the archive includes 32,487 experiments, 150,817 experiment arms, and 538,272,878 participant assignments. The open access dataset is organized to support exploratory and confirmatory research, as well as meta-scientific research on ways that scientists make use of the archive.”

Tubefilter: The Programming Strategies That Shape The World’s Biggest YouTube Channels

Tubefilter: The Programming Strategies That Shape The World’s Biggest YouTube Channels. “For 14 or so years, I have been making a living building some of the largest audiences on the YouTube platform. I’ve seen a lot of videos and channels. What I always find the most interesting, though, is that even after all of the time I’ve spent, all of the videos I’ve watched, all of the papers I’ve written here on Tubefilter, all of the conversations I’ve had with other strategists, all of the data analyses and spreadsheets and reports that I’ve presented–there are still new things to discover, analyze, dissect, and share.”