CBS 3 Philly: New Jersey Transit Unveils Tool To Let Passengers Track Crowding On Trains, Buses

CBS 3 Philly: New Jersey Transit Unveils Tool To Let Passengers Track Crowding On Trains, Buses. “New Jersey Transit has a new tool for passengers concerned about overcrowding because of COVID-19. The agency unveiled a new feature on its app that tracks how full trains and buses are in real-time.”

New York Times: Is the Subway Risky? It May Be Safer Than You Think

New York Times: Is the Subway Risky? It May Be Safer Than You Think. “Five months after the coronavirus outbreak engulfed New York City, riders are still staying away from public transportation in enormous numbers, often because they are concerned that sharing enclosed places with strangers is simply too dangerous. But the picture emerging in major cities across the world suggests that public transportation may not be as risky as nervous New Yorkers believe.”

New York Times: Transit Workers Were N.Y.C.’s Pandemic Lifeline. These 3 Paid a Price.

New York Times: Transit Workers Were N.Y.C.’s Pandemic Lifeline. These 3 Paid a Price. “When the coronavirus engulfed New York, it pummeled the transit workforce: So far, 131 transit workers have died from the virus and over 4,000 have tested positive, making the Metropolitan Transportation Authority one of the hardest-hit government agencies in New York.”

CNN: Coronavirus means many school bus riders could be left with no seat

CNN: Coronavirus means many school bus riders could be left with no seat. “As arguments rage about whether it is safe to have children back in classrooms amid coronavirus, there is another major hurdle — how to get them there. More than 25 million students typically use buses to get to and from school, but with social distancing needs, there will just not be enough space.”

Route Fifty: New Study Will Look at Risks to Transit Workers From Virus

Route Fifty: New Study Will Look at Risks to Transit Workers From Virus. “With the coronavirus infecting thousands of New York City bus and subway workers this year, claiming the lives of dozens of them, a team of academic researchers is planning to investigate the risks that these public employees face on the job. New York University’s School of Global Public Health said Thursday it would launch a series of studies looking at the physical and mental health risks the pandemic is posing for Metropolitan Transportation Authority workers, as well as other effects it is having on their jobs. They’re planning to coordinate with Transport Workers Union Local 100 to carry out the project.”

The MTA has a porn problem: Metro-North station websites feature X-rated search titles (Queens Daily Eagle)

Queens Daily Eagle: The MTA has a porn problem: Metro-North station websites feature X-rated search titles . “The website titles for at least 16 Metro-North stations contain an X-rated message in the Google search results — quite a surprise for anyone looking up Hudson Line train times…. The same dirty description — Flirtatious An*l D*ldo For C*ck Hungry Blonde Sl*t — accompanies 13 stations along the Hudson Line, including Metro-North platforms in Riverdale, Greystone, Hastings-on-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, Tarrytown, Scarborough, Ossining, Croton Harmon, Cortlandt, Garrison, Cold Spring and Breakneck Ridge. That’s one way to get page views. But the MTA says the issue is actually Google’s fault.” Asterisks NOT mine for once, but I’m certainly fine with leaving them there.

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how

The Next Web: Coronavirus has changed travel in European cities for good — here’s how . “At a recent Cities Today Institute roundtable, cities across Europe told a consistent story – public transport ridership is down between 60 and 90 percent on pre-coronavirus levels and capacity is reduced due to social distancing, while private car usage is beginning to climb once again. With revenues from media, parking and other taxes also slashed, this is adding up to a perfect storm of looming congestion and decimated budgets.”

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory

Intelligent Transport: ITF launches Transport Climate Action Directory. ITF is the International Transport Forum. “The Directory aims to provide decision makers with a range of options that can deliver concrete decarbonisation outcomes for transport in their specific national context, helping them to translate their decarbonisation ambitions into actions. It specifically aims to support countries in the upcoming first revision of their nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) for the 2021 Conference of Parties (COP26) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).”

Cities must act to secure the future of urban cycling: our research shows how (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Cities must act to secure the future of urban cycling: our research shows how. “Cities worldwide are preparing for the long transition out of lockdown. Physical distancing measures will be in place for many months, with impacts on all walks of life, not least transport. With public transport options running at low capacity and emerging evidence of the role of air quality and exercise in mitigating the risks of COVID-19, solutions are needed more than ever.”

Inside the Newly Spotless Subway: ‘I’ve Never Seen It Like This’ (New York Times)

New York Times: Inside the Newly Spotless Subway: ‘I’ve Never Seen It Like This’. “The static-filled sound of a conductor’s voice announcing a delay (‘Ladies and gentlemen, we have train traffic ahead of us. We should be moving shortly.’) earned a collective — if quieter than usual — sigh. But inside the subway cars, the system’s new, daily disinfectant regimen combined with the dearth of riders has made the cars almost unrecognizable to New Yorkers all too familiar with trains that once felt like petri dishes for the city’s grime.”

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe

CityLab: In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe. “Between May 9 and June 3, 150 clusters of new coronavirus cases emerged in France, according to the country’s national public health body. Defined as three cases or more of Covid-19 linked by contact, these clusters occurred largely in the sort of places you might predict they would: healthcare facilities, workplaces and homeless shelters — all sites where people mix in enclosed spaces for long periods of time and, in the case of hospitals, where people who are already infected are likely to congregate. What was striking however, was the number of clusters associated with public transit: There weren’t any. For almost a month, not a single Covid-19 cluster had emerged on France’s six metro systems, 26 tram and light rail networks or numerous urban bus routes.”

Phys .org: Researchers aim to help cities prioritize interventions for public transit

Phys .org: Researchers aim to help cities prioritize interventions for public transit. “The New York City Subway—which, under normal circumstances, serves 5.5 million riders daily—resumed service June 8, amid concerns from residents about exposing themselves to the closed, crowded conditions that could be ripe for coronavirus transmission. Researchers at Penn State aim to help minimize the risk of COVID-19 spread by identifying specific subway stations in which intervention resources—such as setting up testing sites, allocating additional personnel to disinfect frequently touched surfaces in subway stations, and distributing masks and hand sanitizer—could be of greatest benefit.”

Los Angeles Times: Coughing echoes through the bus and Metro drivers wonder, ‘Am I going to catch it today?’

Los Angeles Times: Coughing echoes through the bus and Metro drivers wonder, ‘Am I going to catch it today?’. “Coughing filled the bus as Metro’s Line 33 rumbled down Venice Boulevard. The driver looked on, horrified, as a passenger hacked repeatedly into his hands and wiped his palms on the seat. ‘I was disgusted and uneasy,’ said the driver. ‘Like, come on, man. What if someone sat there and they didn’t know? That’s how the virus spreads.’ For thousands of Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus drivers, going to work during a pandemic means spending hours in a confined space with strangers, wondering whether this will be the day they get sick.”