Texas A&M Today: Texas A&M Team Translates Thousands Of Pages Of Math Into Braille

Texas A&M Today: Texas A&M Team Translates Thousands Of Pages Of Math Into Braille. “When Texas A&M University Mathematics Lecturer Vanessa Coffelt wanted to further accommodate coursework for students who are blind or visually impaired, the staff at Texas A&M’s Department of Disability Resources accepted the challenge. They worked closely with the Department of Mathematics to create a Braille translation — more than 2,300 pages worth.”

Stephen Wolfram Blog: Launching Version 13.1 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica 🙀🤠🥳

Stephen Wolfram Blog: Launching Version 13.1 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica 🙀🤠🥳. “In recent years we’ve established something of a rhythm, delivering the fruits of our development efforts roughly twice a year. We released Version 13.0 on December 13, 2021. And now, roughly six months later, we’re releasing Version 13.1. As usual, even though it’s a ‘.1’ release, it’s got a lot of new (and updated) functionality, some of which we’ve worked on for many years but finally now brought to fruition.”

Core77: Plaxtil Recycles Used Face Masks Into School Supplies

Core77: Plaxtil Recycles Used Face Masks Into School Supplies. “French company Plaxtil has used their technology to recycle used face masks into school supplies. Millions of discarded masks have been collected, sanitized, broken back down into plastic and molded into protractors, rulers and triangles for geometry classes.” And given away for free.

CNET: Google Cloud Calculates 100 Trillion Digits of Pi

CNET: Google Cloud Calculates 100 Trillion Digits of Pi. “Google’s cloud service has shattered a record it first broke in 2019, calculating 100 trillion digits of pi, Google Cloud said in a release Wednesday. This is the second time the cloud infrastructure setup has churned out an unprecedented number of digits for the mathematical constant. Last time it took pi to 31.4 trillion digits.”

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global. “The Australian National University’s (ANU) ANU Quantum Numbers (AQN) is the world’s most popular and powerful online random number generator. It uses quantum technology to generate true random numbers at high speed and in real time by measuring the quantum fluctuations of the vacuum. From today, AQN will be available on AWS Marketplace, an online software store that helps customers find, buy, and use software that runs on Amazon Web Services (AWS), an Amazon.com company.”

UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report)

UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report). “This research confirms that the gender gap in learning has closed even in the poorest countries. And in some countries, the gap is now reversed. For example, by grade 8, the gap is in favour of girls in mathematics by 7 percentage points in Malaysia, by 3 points in Cambodia, by 1.7 points in Congo and by 1.4 points in the Philippines. However, biases and stereotypes are still likely to affect learning outcomes. Even though girls catch up in mathematics in upper primary and secondary education, boys are far more likely to be overrepresented among the highest performers in mathematics in all countries.”

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?. “From the 1990s onwards, the financial industry has been built on variations of the diffusion equation, attributed to a variety of mathematicians including Einstein. Professional gamblers make use of logistic regression, developed by the Oxford statistician Sir David Cox in the 50s, to ensure they win at the expense of those punters who are less maths-savvy. There is good reason to expect that there are more billion-dollar equations out there: generations-old mathematical theorems with the potential for new applications. The question is where to look for the next one.”

Engadget: Here’s how to deal with those badly written equations you find online

Engadget: Here’s how to deal with those badly written equations you find online. “Spend enough time on social media and it’s likely that you’ll see what I’ve started to call a Bad Math Scam. This is where an account, looking to juice their engagement figures, posts an equation with a challenge for people to solve it. Often, it’ll say something like ‘Only ‘80s Kids Can Do This’ or ‘Brain Power Challenge: Can You Do This Without a Calculator?’. The only problem is that the equation is so ambiguously-written that you can come up with multiple answers.

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator. “Most of the graphing calculators in students’ backpacks are made by Texas Instruments, and they look a lot like models going back to when these gadgets were introduced in the 1980s. But as the school year gains steam, NumWorks, a calculator startup launched a few years ago, is expanding on a cult following among high school teachers, along with a slice of tech innovators who say they like the company’s consumer-friendly approach to repairs and tinkering.”