PR Newswire: Carnegie Mellon Receives $20 Million to Establish Hoskinson Center for Formal Mathematics in Dietrich College

PR Newswire: Carnegie Mellon Receives $20 Million to Establish Hoskinson Center for Formal Mathematics in Dietrich College. “The Hoskinson Center will develop the technology (via the Lean platform) and techniques needed to increase world-wide access to the power of formal mathematics. The center will support the development of Lean’s digital library, develop new tools to help convert mathematical statements from natural language to a formal language, and create educational resources to make these tools widely available. Used widely, these tools have the potential to super-charge mathematics, which in turn has the power to super-charge computer science, physics and any other discipline that uses mathematics.”

Wolfram Blog: A New Way to Ask Wolfram|Alpha Questions with Math Input

Wolfram Blog: A New Way to Ask Wolfram|Alpha Questions with Math Input. “The input field now formats as you type, which is very helpful, especially for people using Wolfram|Alpha in the classroom, or while studying or doing homework. Most mathematics, especially in the US K–12 standard curriculum, is taught by using handwritten methods, and seeing this formatting as you type is extremely useful.”

CNET: 3,700-year-old clay tablet shows we’ve been using geometry for longer than we realized

CNET: 3,700-year-old clay tablet shows we’ve been using geometry for longer than we realized. “Despite what you may have thought in school, all those numbers and angles really can come in handy — something that even surveyors in ancient Babylon knew. The etchings on the clay tablet pictured above reveal that people have been using geometry in everyday life for centuries longer than many have assumed. The tablet is known as Si.427, and it dates back to the Old Babylonian Period between 1900 and 1600 BCE.”

University of Illinois: UIC websites offer early science and math resources for teachers of young children

New-to-me, from University of Illinois: UIC websites offer early science and math resources for teachers of young children. “The Early Math Counts website, which began in 2012 with grants from the CME Group Foundation, is a suite of free-access online resources focusing on early math for child care teachers. The site is frequented by thousands of monthly users.”

9to5 Google: Google Search adds practice problems, more step-by-step math explainers

9to5 Google: Google Search adds practice problems, more step-by-step math explainers. “Google has increasingly made Search a resource for students and others wanting to learn about various topics. The latest additions see Google Search surface practice problems, while expanding other capabilities. You’re now able to find interactive practice problems in Google Search to test your knowledge of high school math, chemistry, and physics.”

Gizmodo: Google Celebrates Pi Day With a Cute Calculator Easter Egg

Gizmodo: Google Celebrates Pi Day With a Cute Calculator Easter Egg. “The yearly celebration of the mathematical constant π or pi, aka the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter (and here I thought I’d never get a chance to use 9th-grade geometry in real life!). It falls on March 14 because pi written out numerically is 3.14… and then goes on forever because irrational numbers just roll that way. In observance of this pseudo-holiday, Google hid a nerdy little Easter egg in Chrome’s calculator.”

Bloomberg: Math Knowledge Is Another Casualty of the Pandemic

Bloomberg: Math Knowledge Is Another Casualty of the Pandemic. “Shalinee Sharma can track the impact of Covid-19 on students’ math achievement on a daily basis by checking Zearn, the nonprofit company of which she is chief executive and co-founder. Students go to Zearn to take math lessons and to earn badges, which they get for a perfect score on a quiz. Early in the pandemic she and her staff noticed that high-income students were using Zearn more than ever, but the low-income students that Zearn is most concerned about were dropping off. The gap seemed to narrow at the start of this school year, but lately it has widened again.”

‘Classified knots’: Researchers create optical framed knots to encode information (Phys .org)

Phys .org: ‘Classified knots’: Researchers create optical framed knots to encode information. “In a world first, researchers from the University of Ottawa in collaboration with Israeli scientists have been able to create optical framed knots in the laboratory that could potentially be applied in modern technologies. Their work opens the door to new methods of distributing secret cryptographic keys—used to encrypt and decrypt data, ensure secure communication and protect private information.” I tried to look up framed knots but I was hit over the head with a mathematics cudgel. Wikipedia has an overview.

Quanta Magazine: Building the Mathematical Library of the Future

Quanta Magazine: Building the Mathematical Library of the Future. “Digitizing mathematics is a longtime dream. The expected benefits range from the mundane — computers grading students’ homework — to the transcendent: using artificial intelligence to discover new mathematics and find new solutions to old problems. Mathematicians expect that proof assistants could also review journal submissions, finding errors that human reviewers occasionally miss, and handle the tedious technical work that goes into filling in all the details of a proof. But first, the mathematicians who gather on Zulip must furnish Lean with what amounts to a library of undergraduate math knowledge, and they’re only about halfway there.”

The Next Web: A beginner’s guide to the math that powers machine learning

The Next Web: A beginner’s guide to the math that powers machine learning. “At some point in your exploration and mastering of artificial intelligence, you’ll need to come to terms with the lengthy and complicated equations that adorn AI whitepapers and machine learning textbooks. In this post, I will introduce some of my favorite machine learning math resources. And while I don’t expect you to have fun with machine learning math, I will also try my best to give you some guidelines on how to make the journey a bit more pleasant.”

Phys .org: When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths

Phys .org: When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths. “Mathematicians have developed a framework to determine when regions enter and exit COVID-19 infection surge periods, providing a useful tool for public health policymakers to help manage the coronavirus pandemic. The first published paper on second-surge COVID-19 infections from US states suggests that policymakers should look for demonstrable turning points in data rather than stable or insufficiently declining infection rates before lifting restrictions.”

CNN: Parents’ biggest frustration with distance learning

CNN: Parents’ biggest frustration with distance learning. “Helping your child navigate Zoom tech support can be daunting. So can balancing work and household duties with making sure your children are engaged and learning. But the single biggest challenge, many parents say, are the math topics taught through Common Core — a standardized teaching method rolled out in 2010.”