Stephen Wolfram Blog: Launching Version 13.1 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica 🙀🤠🥳

Stephen Wolfram Blog: Launching Version 13.1 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica 🙀🤠🥳. “In recent years we’ve established something of a rhythm, delivering the fruits of our development efforts roughly twice a year. We released Version 13.0 on December 13, 2021. And now, roughly six months later, we’re releasing Version 13.1. As usual, even though it’s a ‘.1’ release, it’s got a lot of new (and updated) functionality, some of which we’ve worked on for many years but finally now brought to fruition.”

CNET: Google Cloud Calculates 100 Trillion Digits of Pi

CNET: Google Cloud Calculates 100 Trillion Digits of Pi. “Google’s cloud service has shattered a record it first broke in 2019, calculating 100 trillion digits of pi, Google Cloud said in a release Wednesday. This is the second time the cloud infrastructure setup has churned out an unprecedented number of digits for the mathematical constant. Last time it took pi to 31.4 trillion digits.”

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global

Australian National University: ANU random numbers go global. “The Australian National University’s (ANU) ANU Quantum Numbers (AQN) is the world’s most popular and powerful online random number generator. It uses quantum technology to generate true random numbers at high speed and in real time by measuring the quantum fluctuations of the vacuum. From today, AQN will be available on AWS Marketplace, an online software store that helps customers find, buy, and use software that runs on Amazon Web Services (AWS), an Amazon.com company.”

UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report)

UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report). “This research confirms that the gender gap in learning has closed even in the poorest countries. And in some countries, the gap is now reversed. For example, by grade 8, the gap is in favour of girls in mathematics by 7 percentage points in Malaysia, by 3 points in Cambodia, by 1.7 points in Congo and by 1.4 points in the Philippines. However, biases and stereotypes are still likely to affect learning outcomes. Even though girls catch up in mathematics in upper primary and secondary education, boys are far more likely to be overrepresented among the highest performers in mathematics in all countries.”

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade

University of Colorado Boulder: Interactive map gets closer to pinpointing African origins erased during slave trade. “Conflicts among African nations during the collapse of the kingdom of Oyo in the early 19th century resulted in the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of people. Soldiers and traders removed men, women and children from their homes, transported them to coastal ports and loaded them onto slave ships—their names, birth places and family ties erased. Historians have a pretty good record of where these individuals departed Africa, but due to a lack of primary sources, little is known about where they originated before boarding slave ships. CU Boulder researchers are hoping to change that with a first-of-its-kind mathematical model estimating conditional probabilities of African origins during the transatlantic slave trade.” I have this under “Research” instead of “New Resources” because the map is more an expression of the model and not a polished […]

TU Wien: Studying the Big Bang with Artificial Intelligence

TU Wien: Studying the Big Bang with Artificial Intelligence. “It could hardly be more complicated: tiny particles whir around wildly with extremely high energy, countless interactions occur in the tangled mess of quantum particles, and this results in a state of matter known as ‘quark-gluon plasma’. Immediately after the Big Bang, the entire universe was in this state; today it is produced by high-energy atomic nucleus collisions, for example at CERN. Such processes can only be studied using high-performance computers and highly complex computer simulations whose results are difficult to evaluate. Therefore, using artificial intelligence or machine learning for this purpose seems like an obvious idea. Ordinary machine-learning algorithms, however, are not suitable for this task. The mathematical properties of particle physics require a very special structure of neural networks. At TU Wien (Vienna), it has now been shown how neural networks can be successfully used for these challenging tasks […]

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?

The Guardian: Equations built giants like Google. Who’ll find the next billion-dollar bit of maths?. “From the 1990s onwards, the financial industry has been built on variations of the diffusion equation, attributed to a variety of mathematicians including Einstein. Professional gamblers make use of logistic regression, developed by the Oxford statistician Sir David Cox in the 50s, to ensure they win at the expense of those punters who are less maths-savvy. There is good reason to expect that there are more billion-dollar equations out there: generations-old mathematical theorems with the potential for new applications. The question is where to look for the next one.”

Engadget: Here’s how to deal with those badly written equations you find online

Engadget: Here’s how to deal with those badly written equations you find online. “Spend enough time on social media and it’s likely that you’ll see what I’ve started to call a Bad Math Scam. This is where an account, looking to juice their engagement figures, posts an equation with a challenge for people to solve it. Often, it’ll say something like ‘Only ‘80s Kids Can Do This’ or ‘Brain Power Challenge: Can You Do This Without a Calculator?’. The only problem is that the equation is so ambiguously-written that you can come up with multiple answers.

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator. “Most of the graphing calculators in students’ backpacks are made by Texas Instruments, and they look a lot like models going back to when these gadgets were introduced in the 1980s. But as the school year gains steam, NumWorks, a calculator startup launched a few years ago, is expanding on a cult following among high school teachers, along with a slice of tech innovators who say they like the company’s consumer-friendly approach to repairs and tinkering.”

Wolfram Blog: Change Your Perspective on the History of Mathematics with These Eight Learning Journeys

Wolfram Blog: Change Your Perspective on the History of Mathematics with These Eight Learning Journeys. “Amid COVID’s first wave, I had the privilege to join forces with Eric Weisstein and his team at Wolfram Research to create the History of Mathematics Project, a virtual interactive gallery highlighting physical artifacts that are important to the history of mathematics, for the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) in New York City. Most of my mandatory confinement at home was spent navigating through online collections from world-class museums, locating outstanding mathematical artifacts and creating interactive and computational explanations for them.”

Wolfram Blog: Exploring Social Networks, Communication Systems, Clustering and More with the Wolfram Language in These New Books

Wolfram Blog: Exploring Social Networks, Communication Systems, Clustering and More with the Wolfram Language in These New Books. “The Wolfram Language is utilized across a variety of fields for many different purposes. We’re proud of our products’ broad applications in multiple disciplines and are excited to share seven of the latest books by Wolfram Language users. These draw upon topics ranging from social networks and communications to computational origami to the biosciences. We also had the privilege of speaking to two authors about their projects and experiences with Mathematica and the Wolfram Language.”

PR Newswire: Carnegie Mellon Receives $20 Million to Establish Hoskinson Center for Formal Mathematics in Dietrich College

PR Newswire: Carnegie Mellon Receives $20 Million to Establish Hoskinson Center for Formal Mathematics in Dietrich College. “The Hoskinson Center will develop the technology (via the Lean platform) and techniques needed to increase world-wide access to the power of formal mathematics. The center will support the development of Lean’s digital library, develop new tools to help convert mathematical statements from natural language to a formal language, and create educational resources to make these tools widely available. Used widely, these tools have the potential to super-charge mathematics, which in turn has the power to super-charge computer science, physics and any other discipline that uses mathematics.”