The Markup: Can Chatrooms Replace Courtrooms?

The Markup: Can Chatrooms Replace Courtrooms?. “Online dispute resolution, as it’s known, had already been growing in popularity as a means to make often costly, slow-moving court processes more efficient. The tools, pioneered by eBay and PayPal, were designed to settle millions of disputes in their own businesses quickly and with as little need for human oversight as possible. But, it turns out, taking an e-commerce dispute platform and imbuing it with legal authority over everything from small claims cases to medical debt suits, child custody negotiations and eviction proceedings has its downsides.”

Herbert Smith Freehills: Delos Launches Open Access Arbitrator Database To Improve Diversity

Herbert Smith Freehills: Delos Launches Open Access Arbitrator Database To Improve Diversity. “The database is open to all at no cost, and any arbitrator can post a profile – no previous appointments are required. Arbitrators can choose the information they enter, including gender, age, nationality, location, and cultural and ethnic background, alongside their experience as counsel, tribunal secretary and arbitrator, language skills, and regional, industry or other specialist expertise.”

Wired: In war zones, social media disinformation is costing lives

Wired: In war zones, social media disinformation is costing lives . “The organisation we work for, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, has spent the past 20 years mediating peace talks. We sit between rebel groups and governments and try to forge ceasefires and political negotiations. It’s risky work that doesn’t always pay off. In recent years, a new phenomenon has made an already difficult job much harder: sophisticated networks of mis- and dis-information on social media.”

MIT News: Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved

MIT News: Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved . “Often, multiple Wikipedia editors will disagree on certain changes to articles or policies. One of the main ways to officially resolve such disputes is the Requests for Comment (RfC) process. Quarreling editors will publicize their deliberation on a forum, where other Wikipedia editors will chime in and a neutral editor will make a final decision. Ideally, this should solve all issues. But a novel study by MIT researchers finds debilitating factors — such as excessive bickering and poorly worded arguments — have led to about one-third of RfCs going unresolved.”