KHN: Why You Can’t Find Cheap At-Home Covid Tests

KHN: Why You Can’t Find Cheap At-Home Covid Tests. “The U.S. produced covid-19 vaccines in record time, but, nearly two years into the pandemic, consumers have few options for cheap tests that quickly screen for infection, though they are widely available in Europe. Experts say the paucity of tests and their high prices undermine efforts in the U.S. to return to normal life.” Cheapest you can get around here that I know of is $24 for a pack of two.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: State launches more consumer-friendly website with inspection reports on healthcare facilities

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: State launches more consumer-friendly website with inspection reports on healthcare facilities. “A month after a glitch took the state’s healthcare facility website offline, the Georgia Department of Community Health on Thursday restored online access while launching a new version of the website with crucial licensing and inspection information for thousands of facilities.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Sarah Kliff brings transparency to ER prices, one hospital bill at a time

Columbia Journalism Review: Sarah Kliff brings transparency to ER prices, one hospital bill at a time . “IT STARTED WITH A BAND-AID. A $629 Band-Aid. A medical bill emailed to Vox senior policy correspondent Sarah Kliff got her interested in emergency room facility fees—a widely applied, highly variable, and little understood cost in the healthcare system. The fees, set between hospitals and insurers, are the charge from the hospital for coming in for treatment. Last October, Kliff set out to learn more about these fees through one of the only ways she could think of to get the information: by collecting hospital bills.”

Paper: National database puts children with medically complex conditions at risk (Rice University)

Rice University: Paper: National database puts children with medically complex conditions at risk. “A proposed national database that would serve as a centralized source of information on children with medically complex conditions puts those children and their families at risk for discrimination by making their health information public, and therefore accessible to employers and health insurers, according to experts at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.”