The Register: We know you all want to shove AI where the sun doesn’t shine. And that’s exactly where it’s going – detecting prostate cancer

The Register: We know you all want to shove AI where the sun doesn’t shine. And that’s exactly where it’s going – detecting prostate cancer . “A team of radiologists at the University of California, Los Angeles, built a convolutional neural network to analyse MRI scans of male nether regions and detect signs of the cancer. These types scans are a lot less invasive method than doctors delicately delving in to collect tissue for biopsies.”

TechSpot: Security researchers fake cancerous nodes in CT scans with machine learning

TechSpot: Security researchers fake cancerous nodes in CT scans with machine learning. “We expect that when we have a CT or MRI scan that the results are accurate. After all we are talking about equipment that can cost millions of dollars and radiologists with years of training and sometimes decades of experience. However, hospital security can be lax and researchers have now shown they can fake CT and MRI scans using a generative adversarial network (GAN).”

Harvard Gazette: Tapping the collective mind

Harvard Gazette: Tapping the collective mind. “If done right, artificial intelligence could drastically reduce both systemic glitches and errors in the decision-making of individual clinicians, according to commentary written by scientists at Harvard Medical School and Google. The article, published April 4 in The New England Journal of Medicine, offers a blueprint for integrating machine learning into the practice of medicine and outlines the promises and pitfalls of a technological advance that has captivated the imaginations of bioinformaticians, clinicians, and nonscientists alike.”

CNRS News: Big Data Boosts Alzheimer’s Research

CNRS News: Big Data Boosts Alzheimer’s Research . “A cutting-edge web platform, fed by brain-scan data from thousands of persons of all ages and states of health, now pinpoints the changes in brain structure that mark the onset of Alzheimer’s in humans under 40, long before any signs of its characteristic memory disorders.”

Digital Trends: A.I. analyzes video to detect signs of cerebral palsy in infants

Digital Trends: A.I. analyzes video to detect signs of cerebral palsy in infants. “An artificial intelligence algorithm capable of signaling early signs of neurodevelopment disorders in infants has been created by researchers in Finland and Italy. By analyzing conventional videos of infants, the algorithm can create ‘skeleton’ videos, which depict a child’s movement in the form of a stick figure. The research could help in early detection of neurodevelopment disorders, such as cerebral palsy.”

Phys .org: Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

Phys .org: Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging. “Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix’s 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds. The advance could make the simple, label-free imaging method practical for clinical applications such as tumor detection or tissue analysis.”

World Health Organization: WHO launches the hearWHO app for mobile devices to help detect hearing loss

World Health Organization: WHO launches the hearWHO app for mobile devices to help detect hearing loss. “Ahead of the annual World Hearing Day (3 March), the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched ‘hearWHO’, a free application for mobile devices which allows people to check their hearing regularly and intervene early in case of hearing loss. The app is targeted at those who are at risk of hearing loss or who already experience some of the symptoms related to hearing loss.”