Stevens Institute of Technology: A.I. Tool Promises Faster, More Accurate Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Stevens Institute of Technology: A.I. Tool Promises Faster, More Accurate Alzheimer’s Diagnosis. “By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer’s sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing. The software not only can diagnose Alzheimer’s, at negligible cost, with more than 95 percent accuracy, but is also capable of explaining its conclusions, allowing physicians to double check the accuracy of its diagnosis.”

ScienceDaily: ‘Selfies’ could be used to detect heart disease

ScienceDaily: ‘Selfies’ could be used to detect heart disease. “Sending a ‘selfie’ to the doctor could be a cheap and simple way of detecting heart disease, according to the authors of a new study published today (Friday) in the European Heart Journal. The study is the first to show that it’s possible to use a deep learning computer algorithm to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) by analysing four photographs of a person’s face.”

EurekAlert: LSU Health New Orleans team creates better tool to aid COVID diagnosis

EurekAlert: LSU Health New Orleans team creates better tool to aid COVID diagnosis. “An LSU Health New Orleans radiologist and evolutionary anatomist have teamed up to show the same techniques used for research on reptile and bird lungs can be used to help confirm the diagnosis of COVID-19 in patients. Their paper published in BMJ Case Reports demonstrates that 3D models are a strikingly clearer method for visually evaluating the distribution of COVID-19-related infection in the respiratory system.”

The Guardian: Baldness and rashes? Experts split over unusual Covid-19 risk factors and symptoms

The Guardian: Baldness and rashes? Experts split over unusual Covid-19 risk factors and symptoms. “From hearing loss and rashes, to being tall and bald, as the Covid-19 pandemic develops, a host of new symptoms and risk factors are being linked to the virus. We take a look at the evidence.”

Bloomberg: Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

Bloomberg: Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows. “Dogs with a few days of training are capable of identifying people infected with the coronavirus, according to a study by a German veterinary university. Eight dogs from Germany’s armed forces were trained for only a week and were able to accurately identify the virus with a 94% success rate, according to a pilot project led by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover. Researchers challenged the dogs to sniff out Covid-19 in the saliva of more than 1,000 healthy and infected people.”

Medical Xpress: Using lung X-rays to diagnose COVID-19

Medical Xpress: Using lung X-rays to diagnose COVID-19. “Researchers from the Department of Computer Architecture and Technology at the University of Seville’s School of Computer Engineering (ETSII) are working on a system that uses X-ray images of patients’ lungs to help diagnose COVID-19. This system uses deep learning to train a neural network model that can distinguish between healthy patients, pneumonia patients and COVID-19 patients. This has been achieved using a freely accessible online database that medical professionals from around the world have been feeding with lung X-rays since the onset of the pandemic.”

EurekAlert: Innovative smartphone-camera adaptation images melanoma and non-melanoma

EurekAlert: Innovative smartphone-camera adaptation images melanoma and non-melanoma. “An article published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), ‘Point-of-care, multispectral, smartphone-based dermascopes for dermal lesion screening and erythema monitoring,’ shows that standard smartphone technology can be adapted to image skin lesions, providing a low-cost, accessible medical diagnostic tool for skin cancer.”

EurekAlert: Artificial intelligence enhances brain tumor diagnosis

EurekAlert: Artificial intelligence enhances brain tumor diagnosis. “A new machine learning approach classifies a common type of brain tumour into low or high grades with almost 98% accuracy, researchers report in the journal IEEE Access. Scientists in India and Japan, including from Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), developed the method to help clinicians choose the most effective treatment strategy for individual patients.”

UMass Med Now: UMass Medical School and UMass Memorial create risk scoring tool to triage COVID-19 patients

UMass Med Now: UMass Medical School and UMass Memorial create risk scoring tool to triage COVID-19 patients. “A COVID-19 risk prediction tool developed at UMass Medical School and deployed at the DCU Field Hospital helped UMass Memorial Health Care hospitals manage the COVID-19 surge in Worcester. The Decompensation Electronic COVID Observational Monitoring Platform Triage (DE-COMP-Triage) provided a score to determine which patients at the field hospital were at highest risk of rapid deterioration and, thus, should be transferred to a regular hospital with an intensive care unit.”

Simon Fraser University: SFU researchers help develop AI tool for speedy COVID-19 diagnosis

Simon Fraser University: SFU researchers help develop AI tool for speedy COVID-19 diagnosis. “Simon Fraser University researchers and Providence Health Care (PHC) are collaborating on a new artificial intelligence tool that will help diagnose COVID-19 quicker.PHC leveraged SFU researchers’ expertise to validate a deep learning Artificial Intelligence (AI) tool to expedite the time healthcare professionals spend distinguishing between COVID-19 pneumonia and non-COVID-19 cases.”

CNET: Who can be tested for coronavirus right now? Here’s who qualifies

CNET: Who can be tested for coronavirus right now? Here’s who qualifies. “Testing tells us a few things, whether it’s a nasal swab or an antibody test: It confirms COVID-19 in people who are presumed to have it — that is, they show symptoms. But it also tells us if people who appear asymptomatic are also harboring the virus. If they are, they may spread it unknowingly. This knowledge helps protect vulnerable groups at higher risk of fatality from the COVID-19 disease. Here’s what you need to know about who can get tested for the coronavirus.”

Washington Post: This veterinary lab is the linchpin in one state’s covid-19 testing approach

Washington Post: This veterinary lab is the linchpin in one state’s covid-19 testing approach. “Akhilesh Ramachandran emailed Oklahoma’s public health laboratory just days after the novel coronavirus hit the state in March. As a manager of a veterinary school diagnostic lab, he knew lots about rapid, high-volume testing for viruses — in animals. He offered his facility as a ‘backup’ for human testing, he said, figuring officials ‘might say, “You guys do 100 samples, and we’ll do the rest.” ‘ But within weeks, the Oklahoma State University lab — which typically tests for diseases such as rabies in dogs and respiratory ailments in Oklahoma’s large cattle industry — was running more human covid-19 tests than any other lab in the state.”

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19

BBC: The groundbreaking way to search lungs for signs of Covid-19. “When Covid-19 was at its height in China, doctors in the city of Wuhan were able to use artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to scan the lungs of thousands of patients. The algorithm in question, developed by Axial AI, analyses CT imagery in seconds. It declares, for example, whether a patient has a high risk of viral pneumonia from coronavirus or not.”