Science Daily: Social media for medical journals operates in ‘wild west,’ needs more support to succeed

Science Daily: Social media for medical journals operates in ‘wild west,’ needs more support to succeed . “In this first study to examine social media editor roles at medical journals, researchers found that while medical journals are using social media more to extend the reach of new research, the responsibilities and measures of success for these roles aren’t well defined or supported. More support is needed to get the information to the public more efficiently.”

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals. “One of the world’s top breast cancer doctors failed to disclose millions of dollars in payments from drug and health care companies in recent years, omitting his financial ties from dozens of research articles in prestigious publications like The New England Journal of Medicine and The Lancet.”

Internet Archive: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Awards Grant to the Internet Archive for Long Tail Journal Preservation

Internet Archive: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Awards Grant to the Internet Archive for Long Tail Journal Preservation. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a research and development grant to the Internet Archive to address the critical need to preserve the ‘long tail’ of open access scholarly communications. The project, Ensuring the Persistent Access of Long Tail Open Access Journal Literature, builds on prototype work identifying at-risk content held in web archives by using data provided by identifier services and registries. Furthermore, the project expands on work acquiring missing open access articles via customized web harvesting, improving discovery and access to this materials from within extant web archives, and developing machine learning approaches, training sets, and cost models for advancing and scaling this project’s work.”

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE). “SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced that its Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics will become fully open access journals in January 2019. The Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO) has been published since 1996 and is edited by Lihong Wang of California Institute of Technology. Brian Pogue of Dartmouth College will assume the JBO editorship starting in January 2018. JBO publishes peer-reviewed papers on the use of modern optical technology for improved health care and biomedical research. Neurophotonics, edited by David Boas of Boston University, was launched by SPIE in 2014, and covers optical technologies applicable to study of the brain and their impact on the basic and clinical neuroscience applications.”

PubChem Blog: Publisher Springer Nature contributes millions of chemical-article links

PubChem Blog: Publisher Springer Nature contributes millions of chemical-article links. “PubChem added more than 26 million links to scientific articles, thanks to contributions from the publisher Springer Nature. Of these, 1.6 million links point to open access or free-to-read documents! Springer Nature includes the SpringerLink, SpringerOpen, and BioMed Central research platforms as well as the nature.com website. Combined, they include more than 10 million scientific documents spanning the primary literature, book chapters, and reference works. InfoChem, a subsidiary of Springer Nature, identified the chemicals mentioned in these scientific articles using a proprietary approach.”

Retraction Watch: Widely used U.S. government database delists cancer journal

RetractionWatch: Widely used U.S. government database delists cancer journal. “The U.S. government biomedical research database MEDLINE no longer includes a cancer journal with a storied past. Starting August 2017, researchers looking up journals indexed in MEDLINE (which is accessed via PubMed) could no longer find new articles published by Oncotarget, once included on the now-defunct list of possibly predatory journals compiled by librarian Jeffrey Beall.”

ScotPublicHealth: Quantifying the reach and punch of a single BMJ article on social media

ScotPublicHealth: Quantifying the reach and punch of a single BMJ article on social media. “The BMJ cover story on 9 September 2017 explored a Twitter ban at a medical conference in the United States. The article included responses to the Twitter ban from two of the most prominent physician tweeters from the US (Prof Michael Gibson and Dr Kevin Campbell), a couple of comments from me, and social network analysis (SNA) that I had performed looking at the tweets that emerged from the conference. The analysis showed that the ban itself was a much bigger topic of conversation on Twitter than any clinical or scientific learning from the conference. In this blog I explore the reach and impact of the BMJ article on social media in the days after publication.”

NLM: NLM and Publishers Launch Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Libraries Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma

National Library of Medicine: NLM and Publishers Launch Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Libraries Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. “The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. The EAI is a collaborative partnership between NLM and participating publishers to provide free access to full-text from more than 650 biomedical journals and more than 4,000 reference books and online databases to healthcare professionals and libraries affected by disasters. It serves as a temporary collection replacement and/or supplement for libraries affected by disasters that need to continue to serve medical staff and affiliated users. It is also intended for medical personnel responding to the specified disaster.”

Newswise: ASTRO Journal Advances in Radiation Oncology Now Indexed in PubMed Central

Newswise: ASTRO Journal Advances in Radiation Oncology Now Indexed in PubMed Central. “Advances in Radiation Oncology, the newest journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), is now indexed by PubMed Central, a free, full-text archive of biomedical and life sciences literature organized by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH)’s National Library of Medicine. All articles previously published in the journal are included in PubMed.”

The Guardian: Dozens of recent clinical trials may contain wrong or falsified data, claims study

The Guardian: Dozens of recent clinical trials may contain wrong or falsified data, claims study. “Dozens of recent clinical trials contain suspicious statistical patterns that could indicate incorrect or falsified data, according to a review of thousands of papers published in leading medical journals. The study, which used statistical tools to identify anomalies hidden in the data, has prompted investigations into some of the trials identified as suspect and raises new concerns about the reliability of some papers published in medical journals.”

The Guardian: It’s time for academics to take back control of research journals

The Guardian: It’s time for academics to take back control of research journals . “‘Publish or perish’ has long been the mantra of academics seeking to make a success of their research career. Reputations are built on the ability to communicate something new to the world. Increasingly, however, they are determined by numbers, not by words, as universities are caught in a tangle of management targets composed of academic journal impact factors, university rankings and scores in the government’s research excellence framework.”

A new record: Major publisher retracting more than 100 studies from cancer journal over fake peer reviews (Retraction Watch)

Retraction Watch, and man is my blood boiling: A new record: Major publisher retracting more than 100 studies from cancer journal over fake peer reviews. “Springer is retracting 107 papers from one journal after discovering they had been accepted with fake peer reviews. Yes, 107. To submit a fake review, someone (often the author of a paper) either makes up an outside expert to review the paper, or suggests a real researcher — and in both cases, provides a fake email address that comes back to someone who will invariably give the paper a glowing review. In this case, Springer, the publisher of Tumor Biology through 2016, told us that an investigation produced ‘clear evidence’ the reviews were submitted under the names of real researchers with faked emails. Some of the authors may have used a third-party editing service, which may have supplied the reviews. The journal is now published by SAGE.”

Medium: How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access

Medium: How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access. “It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.”

Medium: Can Your Doctor See the Cancer Research Reported in the News? Can you?

Medium: Can Your Doctor See the Cancer Research Reported in the News? Can you? “The issue of biomedical research in the news media highlights a weakness in the policy’s potential to mandate access to information in a timely manner for the benefit of the public. Currently, the 12-month embargo disenfranchises journalists working to make sense of new research while on deadline, physicians needing to stay up to date, and patients wanting to make timely informed decisions about their health alongside medical practitioners.”

Max Planck, Taylor & Francis Group Make Agreement

The Max Planck Digital Library and the Taylor & Francis Group have made an agreement. “The Max Planck Digital Library and Taylor & Francis Group have signed an agreement which enables researchers based in Max Planck institutes to publish open access in 2,390 journals, under a centrally funded arrangement. This applies to peer-reviewed papers in full and hybrid Taylor & Francis Group journals, including Routledge and Cogent OA titles. Max Planck Institutes will also have shared access to a set of Taylor & Francis subscription journals and can swap and add individual titles up to an agreed limit to meet reader demand.”