The Next Web: Healthcare has a massive cybersecurity problem, and we’re not doing enough to fix it.

The Next Web: Healthcare has a massive cybersecurity problem, and we’re not doing enough to fix it.. “Not long ago, it was reasonable to think that financial businesses would be the most prominent and most profitable targets of criminal activity. After all, a successful bank robbery could score you tens of thousands of dollars (or more). But these days, it’s another industry facing the brunt of criminal attacks, and it’s one with much more bearing on us as consumers: healthcare.”

ZDNet: Microsoft is closing its HealthVault patient-records service on November 20

ZDNet: Microsoft is closing its HealthVault patient-records service on November 20. “Microsoft is dropping its HealthVault patient records-management service, the company notified customers via email today, April 5. The service will be shut down on November 20 and any data residing in the service will be deleted after that date.”

University of Washington: Data error exposes patient information

University of Washington Medicine: Data error exposes patient information. “On Dec. 26, 2018, UW Medicine became aware of a vulnerability on a website server that made protected internal files available and visible by search on the internet on Dec. 4, 2018. The files contained protected health information (PHI) about reporting that UW Medicine is legally required to track, such as reporting to various regulatory bodies, in compliance with Washington state reporting requirements…. The files contained patients’ names, medical record numbers, and a description and purpose of the information. The files did not contain any medical records, patient financial information or Social Security numbers.”

Baylor College of Medicine: Plan would make electronic health records more usable

Baylor College of Medicine: Plan would make electronic health records more usable. “Over the past decade both clinicians and researchers have increasingly discovered that electronic health records are not always user friendly and may result in unintended consequences that compromise patient safety. In a recently published paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and their collaborators suggest a five-point action plan to improve the usability and safety of health information technology moving forward.”

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records. “In a continued effort to speed up the diagnostic process of severe genetic diseases, Stanford’s Gill Bejerano, PhD, and his colleagues have developed a new algorithm that can quickly locate important disease-related information within a patient’s medical record.”

Slashgear: Hospitals, insurance companies leak more health data than hackers

Slashgear: Hospitals, insurance companies leak more health data than hackers. “Hospitals, insurance firms, physician offices, and similar companies leak more personal health data than hackers, a new study has revealed. According to researchers with two major US universities, more than half of personal health data breaches resulted from problems with the medical providers themselves rather than an external force, such as hackers.”

The Register: Hey, you know what a popular medical record system doesn’t need? 23 security vulnerabilities

The Register: Hey, you know what a popular medical record system doesn’t need? 23 security vulnerabilities. “Fresh light has been shed on a batch of security vulnerabilities discovered in the widely used OpenEMR medical records storage system. A team of researchers at Project Insecurity discovered and reported the flaws, which were patched last month by the OpenEMR developers in version 5.0.1.4. With the fixes now having been out for several weeks, the infosec crew on Tuesday publicly emitted full details of the critical security bugs, with a disclosure [PDF] so long it has its own table of contents.”