Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records. “In a continued effort to speed up the diagnostic process of severe genetic diseases, Stanford’s Gill Bejerano, PhD, and his colleagues have developed a new algorithm that can quickly locate important disease-related information within a patient’s medical record.”

Slashgear: Hospitals, insurance companies leak more health data than hackers

Slashgear: Hospitals, insurance companies leak more health data than hackers. “Hospitals, insurance firms, physician offices, and similar companies leak more personal health data than hackers, a new study has revealed. According to researchers with two major US universities, more than half of personal health data breaches resulted from problems with the medical providers themselves rather than an external force, such as hackers.”

The Register: Hey, you know what a popular medical record system doesn’t need? 23 security vulnerabilities

The Register: Hey, you know what a popular medical record system doesn’t need? 23 security vulnerabilities. “Fresh light has been shed on a batch of security vulnerabilities discovered in the widely used OpenEMR medical records storage system. A team of researchers at Project Insecurity discovered and reported the flaws, which were patched last month by the OpenEMR developers in version 5.0.1.4. With the fixes now having been out for several weeks, the infosec crew on Tuesday publicly emitted full details of the critical security bugs, with a disclosure [PDF] so long it has its own table of contents.”

ZDNet: Canberra still in denial over My Health Record concerns

ZDNet: Canberra still in denial over My Health Record concerns. “Denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. The Australian government’s response to the grief it’s getting over the controversial My Health Record is now up to stage three. Provided you call a PR barrage ‘bargaining’. Which is isn’t. No, they’re still just getting angry.”

CNET: One in four Singapore residents hit in medical data theft

CNET: One in four Singapore residents hit in medical data theft. “Hackers stole the personal data of 1.5 million people in Singapore by breaking into a government health database, officials said Friday. The data, taken between June 27 and July 4, included names and addresses of those who had visited health clinics since May 2015, but not full medical records. However, details about medications were stolen from about 160,000 people, according to a government statement.”

Times of Israel: Despite privacy concerns, Israel to put nation’s medical database online

Times of Israel: Despite privacy concerns, Israel to put nation’s medical database online. “The Israeli government on Sunday approved a National Digital Health plan, which, despite mounting privacy concerns, plans to create a digital database of the medical files of some 9 million residents and make them available to researchers and enterprises.” After reading about so much misuse of personal information and data leaks, I’m honestly shocked Israel is going to do this.

UAMS: UAMS receives $8.3 million grant to expand digital archive for cancer research

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences: UAMS receives $8.3 million grant to expand digital archive for cancer research. “The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) will use an $8.3 million grant to expand and enhance an archive of freely accessible cancer medical images and data. On Tuesday (Oct. 31), UAMS announced it received the grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA) is a free online service with a large collection of cancer-related medical images the public can download. All patient identifying information has been removed from the images, and data from the archive has been used for nearly 500 academic papers.”