Science Business: Free access to research papers by 2020? ‘Impossible without radical steps’, says EU official

Science Business: Free access to research papers by 2020? ‘Impossible without radical steps’, says EU official. “A senior European Commission official called for ‘radical steps’ to speed up making publicly funded research in Europe freely available to readers, rather than locked behind publishers’ paywalls. ‘We are today at 20 per cent full open access,’ said Robert-Jan Smits, former director-general for research and innovation at the Commission. ‘Fifteen years ago, we were at 15 per cent open access,’ and in 2016 the EU set a target that all publicly research be open, free, to readers by 2020.”

Health Europa: Neurodegenerative disease research funding up by a third since 2011

Health Europa: Neurodegenerative disease research funding up by a third since 2011. “Global neurodegenerative disease research funding has seen a substantial improvement, with funding being up by a third since 2011, according to a new survey. As of today (17 July), funders and researchers are able to access a database that contains survey information from across three-decades worth of global neurodegenerative disease research funding.”

Inside Higher Education: New Tool for Open-Access Research

Inside Higher Education: New Tool for Open-Access Research. “Get the Research will connect the public with 20 million open-access scholarly articles. The site will be built by Impactstory — the nonprofit behind browser extension tool Unpaywall — in conjunction with the Internet Archive and the British Library.” I’ve signed up to try to get early access.

Wired: The Complexity Of Simply Searching For Medical Advice

Wired: The Complexity Of Simply Searching For Medical Advice. “IN THE FIRST few hours of a newborn’s life, doctors administer a vitamin K shot. This is because infants are born without enough of the vitamin, and the baby needs a boost to prevent any potential bleeding. This is a routine practice—ask your pediatrician, your obstetrician, or the CDC…. But new parents who turn to search engines to understand the practice will find an aberrant—and dangerous—strain of thinking.”

Global News: First of its kind database aims to reveal how FASD affects Canadians

Global News: First of its kind database aims to reveal how FASD affects Canadians. “Saskatchewan, like other provinces, does not collect specific data on how many people have fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The Canada FASD Research Network (CanFASD) is launching the first national database, and first globally, on the disorder.”

The Regulatory Review: Improving Federal Regulation of Medical Algorithms

The Regulatory Review: Improving Federal Regulation of Medical Algorithms. “In emergency situations, doctors have little time to save the lives of trauma patients. Gunshot wounds, car crashes, and other life-threatening harms often cause severe blood loss, which is the leading cause of preventable death when trauma puts patients’ lives on the line. To manage the demands of these emergency cases, physicians today complement their medical skill-set with a new tool: algorithms. But in a recent paper, a legal scholar argues that federal regulatory reforms must occur to unleash the full lifesaving potential of algorithms in health care. Nicholson Price, a professor at University of Michigan Law School, claims that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks the necessary expertise in computer science to apply its current regulations to medical algorithms and, as a result, could discourage much-needed innovation.”

Earther: Scientists Have Invented Craigslist For Shark Livers

Earther: Scientists Have Invented Craigslist For Shark Livers. “In order to save endangered species, biologists are often forced to take a step that feels counterproductive: sacrificing wild specimens for study. Now, a pair of grad students have devised a virtual tissue bank that could help reduce the number of rare plants and animals killed in the name of science.”