New Scientist: Global cancer scheme lets people share data across the world

New Scientist: Global cancer scheme lets people share data across the world. “People with cancer will soon be able to donate their medical information to a global database aimed at discovering new treatments…. When the database becomes fully functional later this year, any individual with cancer will have access to a document – the ‘Universal Patient Consent Form’ – that will allow them to make their medical and genetic data freely accessible to all cancer researchers.”

PR Newswire: NCCN Provides New, Free Database to Assist in Cancer Research Collaborations

PR Newswire: NCCN Provides New, Free Database to Assist in Cancer Research Collaborations (PRESS RELEASE). “The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) Oncology Research Program (ORP) announced today that they are broadening the use of the Shared Resource Database to all cancer centers in the United States. This move reinforces NCCN ORP’s dedication to collaborative research that improves cancer care…. The Shared Resource Database currently includes more than 240 resources, such as complex technologies, instrumentation facilities, human tissue specimens, animal models, specialized databases, and many other specialty research items. It has been available exclusively to the 27 NCCN Member Institutions for the past two years.”

University of Southern California: Shared database of brain images aims to boost stroke patients’ recovery

University of Southern California: Shared database of brain images aims to boost stroke patients’ recovery. “A USC-led team has archived and shared hundreds of brain scans from stroke patients, which researchers hope will help to forecast which patients will respond to a variety of rehabilitation therapies. The study of the data set, known as Anatomical Tracings of Lesion After Stroke (ATLAS), was published in Scientific Data, a Nature journal.”

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research

University of Pennsylvania: New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research. “A single epidemiological study—tracking the acquisition of functional resistance to malaria, or the relationship of diarrheal disease to developmental outcomes—may involve tens of thousands of clinical observations on thousands of participants from multiple countries. To overcome these hurdles, an international team of researchers has launched the Clinical Epidemiology Database, an open-access online resource enabling investigators to maximize the utility and reach of their data and to make optimal use of information released by others.”

National Institutes of Health: NIH program to accelerate therapies for arthritis, lupus releases first datasets

National Institutes of Health: NIH program to accelerate therapies for arthritis, lupus releases first datasets .”Datasets characterizing individual cells in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus disease tissue from the Accelerating Medicines Partnership for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (AMP RA/SLE) Phase I study are now available to the research community. Scientists from across the biomedical research community can access the AMP RA/SLE datasets to explore important research questions about these autoimmune conditions.”

Stanford: Database allows physicians to tailor prescriptions to complement an individual’s genome

Stanford: Database allows physicians to tailor prescriptions to complement an individual’s genome. “The database is a website that, through careful curation, collects information to help researchers, doctors and patients understand the intersection of genes and drugs, a field of study known as pharmacogenomics. Visitors to the site will find detailed information about molecular drug structures, metabolic pathways, and perhaps most valuably, specific genes that have the potential to influence how certain medications function in the body. Currently, the website…highlights about 5,500 genetic variants that affect the activity of 600 drugs.”

The Verge: Google’s new AI algorithm predicts heart disease by looking at your eyes

The Verge: Google’s new AI algorithm predicts heart disease by looking at your eyes. “Scientists from Google and its health-tech subsidiary Verily have discovered a new way to assess a person’s risk of heart disease using machine learning. By analyzing scans of the back of a patient’s eye, the company’s software is able to accurately deduce data, including an individual’s age, blood pressure, and whether or not they smoke. This can then be used to predict their risk of suffering a major cardiac event — such as a heart attack — with roughly the same accuracy as current leading methods.”