New York Times: How the Search for Covid-19 Treatments Faltered While Vaccines Sped Ahead

New York Times: How the Search for Covid-19 Treatments Faltered While Vaccines Sped Ahead. “The government poured $18.5 billion into vaccines, a strategy that resulted in at least five effective products at record-shattering speed. But its investment in drugs was far smaller, about $8.2 billion, most of which went to just a few candidates, such as monoclonal antibodies. Studies of other drugs were poorly organized. The result was that many promising drugs that could stop the disease early, called antivirals, were neglected. Their trials have stalled, either because researchers couldn’t find enough funding or enough patients to participate.”

National Library of Medicine: Progress Towards a Modernized ClinicalTrials. gov

National Library of Medicine: Progress Towards a Modernized ClinicalTrials.gov. “In 2019, NLM introduced a multi-year effort to modernize ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest publicly accessible database of privately and publicly funded clinical trials. This effort was launched with a commitment to engage with and serve the millions of users who rely on this essential resource — with a focus on delivering an improved user experience on an updated platform that will accommodate growth and enhance efficiency.”

News-Medical: New consortium aims to establish the biggest pathology data to advance artificial intelligence

News-Medical: New consortium aims to establish the biggest pathology data to advance artificial intelligence. “To take AI development in pathology to the next level, a European consortium combining leading European research centers, hospitals as well as major pharmaceutical industries, is going to develop a repository for the sharing of pathology data. The 6-year, €70 million projects called BIGPICTURE, will herald a new era in pathology.”

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences

The Conversation: As scientists turn their attention to COVID-19, other research is not getting done – and that can have lasting consequences. “When a new virus is ravaging the planet, scientists should help. This is an all-hands-on-deck emergency, and researchers with different backgrounds can bring new perspectives that can lead to major breakthroughs. Yet there is some evidence that as labs have shifted attention to SARS-CoV-2, efforts have been duplicated, and precious time and resources have been used ineffectively. This rapid scientific reorientation has implications far beyond SARS-COV-2 and potentially leaves the world vulnerable to other health crises.”

CBS Boston: Study Finds Vitamin C, Zinc Don’t Help Fight COVID

CBS Boston: Study Finds Vitamin C, Zinc Don’t Help Fight COVID. “Despite the popular use of vitamin C and zinc to fight off or lessen the severity of viral colds and flu, the new study, published Friday in JAMA Network Open, found the two supplements were of no benefit to people isolating at home with Covid-19. In fact, the findings were so unimpressive that the study was stopped early.”

EurekAlert: New tool facilitates inclusion of people of diverse ancestry in large genetics studies

EurekAlert: New tool facilitates inclusion of people of diverse ancestry in large genetics studies. “Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have typically excluded diverse and minority individuals in the search for gene variants that confer risk of disease. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and other institutions around the world have now developed a free-access software package called Tractor that increases the discovery power of genomics in understudied populations. A study of Tractor’s performance and accuracy was published in Nature Genetics.”

Birmingham Business Journal: UAB researchers build database for Covid therapy discovery

Birmingham Business Journal: UAB researchers build database for Covid therapy discovery. “UAB’s new database, PAGER-CoV, has nearly 12,000 pieces of genetic information on the SARS-CoV02 virus. This is information that researchers and physicians can use to craft individualized treatments against the disease. PAGER-CoV is an extension of PAGER, a database of gene sets created by Jake Chen, a professor in the Department of Genetics at UAB and associate director of the Informatics Institute in the UAB School of Medicine.”

News Medical: NIH launches database to collect information about COVID-19-related neurological problems

News Medical: NIH launches database to collect information about COVID-19-related neurological problems. “The COVID-19 Neuro Databank/Biobank (NeuroCOVID), which was created and will be maintained by NYU Langone Health, New York City, will be a resource of clinical information as well as biospecimens from people of all ages who have experienced neurological problems associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.”

San Francisco Chronicle: ‘New weapon’ to kill COVID? UCSF-led team finds drug that could be far more effective than remdesivir

San Francisco Chronicle: ‘New weapon’ to kill COVID? UCSF-led team finds drug that could be far more effective than remdesivir. “After a yearlong search for existing drugs that might help COVID-19 patients and point to a cure, a UCSF-led science team has identified what they say is an especially promising candidate: an anti-cancer drug that kills the coronavirus in lab studies and is almost 30 times more potent than remdesivir, one of the few antiviral drugs available to treat the disease.”