Nature: Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data

Nature: Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data. “Researchers around the world are racing to spot variants of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 so that they can determine whether the mutated viruses will evade vaccines or make COVID-19 deadlier. Like many scientists, Ndodo shares SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences in a popular data repository, GISAID, that requires users to sign in and to credit those whose data they analyse. But a growing faction of scientists, mostly from wealthy nations, argues that sequences should be shared on databases with no gatekeeping at all.”

World Health Organization: WHO launches new platform for knowledge exchange on dementia

World Health Organization: WHO launches new platform for knowledge exchange on dementia. “The new tool, the Global Dementia Observatory Knowledge Exchange Platform, contains key resources to support the implementation of the Global action plan on the public heath response to dementia 2017-2025 and its seven action areas. It provides a space for stakeholders to share resources, such as policies, guidelines, case studies and examples of good practice, to facilitate mutual learning and promote the exchange of knowledge in the area of dementia.”

EurekAlert: Personalised medications possible with 3D printing

EurekAlert: Personalised medications possible with 3D printing. “Customised medicines could one day be manufactured to patients’ individual needs, with University of East Anglia (UEA) researchers investigating technology to 3D ‘print’ pills. The team, including Dr Andy Gleadall and Prof Richard Bibb at Loughborough University, identified a new additive manufacturing method to allow the 3D printing of medicine in highly porous structures, which can be used to regulate the rate of drug release from the medicine to the body when taken orally.”

Sciencemag: C-Path Opens Access To Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Database

Scienmag: C-Path Opens Access To Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Database. “Critical Path Institute (C-Path) announced today that it will open access to the Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium (D-RSC) database to qualified researchers, through its Rare Disease Cures Accelerator, Data and Analytics Platform (RDCA-DAP®). The D-RSC database includes data from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) clinical trials, natural history studies and clinical data collections. The contributors of these datasets have given permission for this data to be shared externally to accelerate therapy development for DMD. DMD is a rare, fatal, genetic neuromuscular disorder that is diagnosed in childhood and primarily affects males.”

Phys .org: New web app ranks spillover risk for newly detected viruses

Phys .org: New web app ranks spillover risk for newly detected viruses. “SARS-CoV-2 showed the world with devastating clarity the threat undetected viruses can pose to global public health. SpillOver, a new web application developed by scientists at the University of California, Davis, and contributed to by experts from all over the world, ranks the risk of wildlife-to-human spillover for newly-discovered viruses.”

Futurity: Sunlight Inactivates SARS-CoV-2 Way Faster Than Expected

Futurity: Sunlight Inactivates SARS-CoV-2 Way Faster Than Expected. “Many science-backed COVID-19 management concepts remain unchanged to this day: hand washing with soap and warm water disrupts the virus’ lipid membrane. Social distancing can attenuate the virus’s spread, ideally keeping it out of a host until it degrades. Other notions, such as droplet contact being the primary mode of transmission, were modified when emerging evidence showed that under certain conditions, the virus could remain suspended in air for extended periods of time. In a letter in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, researchers conclude that it might take more than UV-B rays to explain sunlight inactivation of SARS-CoV-2.”

Study: AI tool can help spot Type 2 diabetes trends in the U.S. (University at Buffalo)

University at Buffalo: Study: AI tool can help spot Type 2 diabetes trends in the U.S.. “A new University at Buffalo study reports on the advantages of using artificial intelligence to better understand Type 2 diabetes across the United States. The study describes how machine learning — a subset of AI that involves computers acting intelligently without being explicitly programmed — can help explore the prevalence of the disease, which effects more than 34 million Americans, as well as spot future trends.”

AP Exclusive: WHO report says animals likely source of COVID (AP)

AP: AP Exclusive: WHO report says animals likely source of COVID. “A joint WHO-China study on the origins of COVID-19 says that transmission of the virus from bats to humans through another animal is the most likely scenario and that a lab leak is ‘extremely unlikely,’ according to a draft copy obtained by The Associated Press. The findings were largely as expected and left many questions unanswered. The team proposed further research in every area except the lab leak hypothesis.”

Scientific Data: AI-assisted tracking of worldwide non-pharmaceutical interventions for COVID-19

Scientific Data: AI-assisted tracking of worldwide non-pharmaceutical interventions for COVID-19. “We present the Worldwide Non-pharmaceutical Interventions Tracker for COVID-19 (WNTRAC), a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 6,000 NPIs implemented worldwide since the start of the pandemic. WNTRAC covers NPIs implemented across 261 countries and territories, and classifies NPIs into a taxonomy of 16 NPI types. NPIs are automatically extracted daily from Wikipedia articles using natural language processing techniques and then manually validated to ensure accuracy and veracity.”

Coronavirus: How the common cold can boot out Covid (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: How the common cold can boot out Covid. “The virus that causes the common cold can effectively boot the Covid virus out of the body’s cells, say researchers. Some viruses are known to compete in order to be the one that causes an infection. And University of Glasgow scientists say it appears cold-causing rhinovirus trumps coronavirus.”

New York Times: AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 Vaccine Is Found to Be 79% Effective in U.S. Study

New York Times: AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 Vaccine Is Found to Be 79% Effective in U.S. Study. “The trial, involving more than 32,000 participants, was the largest test of its kind for the shot. The vaccine was 79 percent effective overall in preventing symptomatic infections, higher than observed in previous clinical trials, the company announced in a news release. The trial also showed that the vaccine offered strong protection for older people, who had not been as well represented in earlier studies.”

Jerusalem Post: COVID-19 deadlier, more severe than influenza – study

Jerusalem Post: COVID-19 deadlier, more severe than influenza – study. “The study compared 1,052 patients with influenza and 582 patients with COVID-19 and found more people on average needed hospital care if infected with the novel coronavirus (582) when compared to those suffering from influenza (210). Roughly 30% among those suffering from COVID-19 needed mechanical ventilation whereas only 8% among those with influenza needed such treatment.”

Medical XPress: Children with adrenal insufficiency are 10 times more likely to die from COVID-19

Medical XPress: Children with adrenal insufficiency are 10 times more likely to die from COVID-19. “Children with adrenal insufficiency—a condition in which the adrenal gland does not function properly—are at more than 10 times higher risk for COVID-19 complications and death compared with children with normal adrenal glands, according to a study presented virtually at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.”

University of Florida: New AI tool to be tested in NIH-funded study to improve diagnosis of Parkinson’s and related disorders

University of Florida: New AI tool to be tested in NIH-funded study to improve diagnosis of Parkinson’s and related disorders. “The three distinct neurodegenerative disorders — Parkinson’s disease; multiple system atrophy Parkinsonian variant, or MSAp; and progressive supranuclear palsy, or PSP — can be difficult to differentiate because they share overlapping motor and non-motor features, such as changes in gait. But they also have important differences in pathology and prognosis, and obtaining an accurate diagnosis is key to determining the best possible treatment for patients as well as developing improved therapies of the future. Previous research has shown that accuracy of diagnosis in early Parkinson’s can be as low as 58%, and more than half of misdiagnosed patients actually have one of the two variants.”