University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Develop Rapid, Highly Accurate Test to Detect Viruses like COVID-19

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Develop Rapid, Highly Accurate Test to Detect Viruses like COVID-19. “University of Central Florida researchers have developed a device that detects viruses like COVID-19 in the body as fast as and more accurately than current, commonly used rapid detection tests. The optical sensor uses nanotechnology to accurately identify viruses in seconds from blood samples.”

KHN: Why You Can’t Find Cheap At-Home Covid Tests

KHN: Why You Can’t Find Cheap At-Home Covid Tests. “The U.S. produced covid-19 vaccines in record time, but, nearly two years into the pandemic, consumers have few options for cheap tests that quickly screen for infection, though they are widely available in Europe. Experts say the paucity of tests and their high prices undermine efforts in the U.S. to return to normal life.” Cheapest you can get around here that I know of is $24 for a pack of two.

Medical Xpress: Same day test identifies secondary infections in COVID-19 patients

Medical Xpress: Same day test identifies secondary infections in COVID-19 patients. “A same-day test has been shown to successfully identify secondary infections for patients on intensive care in hours rather than days, according to research from Guy’s and St Thomas’. The DNA sequencing based test was evaluated by doctors in the intensive care unit (ICU) at St Thomas’ Hospital with 34 ICU patients during the first COVID-19 pandemic wave.”

State of Michigan: Gov. Whitmer Pilots COVID-19 Testing Program to Protect Students & Families

State of Michigan: Gov. Whitmer Pilots COVID-19 Testing Program to Protect Students & Families. “Governor Gretchen Whitmer today launched a new pilot program in partnership with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) called MI Backpack Home Tests to provide free, at-home COVID antigen tests to participating schools to create a safer environment for K-12 students, parents, teachers, and support staff amid the pandemic.”

NIH: When to Test offers free online tool to help individuals make informed COVID-19 testing decisions

NIH: When to Test offers free online tool to help individuals make informed COVID-19 testing decisions. “Demand is increasing for COVID-19 testing among individuals and families, especially as winter approaches and people shift to indoor activities. The National Institutes of Health’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative today announced the launch of the When To Test Calculator for Individuals, a companion to the version for organizations introduced last winter. By responding to just a few prompts, the new individual impact calculator indicates whether a person should get a test—now or soon.”

Wichita Eagle: Questions and scrambling follow news that KDHE will stop providing free COVID testing

Wichita Eagle: Questions and scrambling follow news that KDHE will stop providing free COVID testing. “Across Wichita, nonprofits and businesses have been scrambling as word trickles out that the Kansas Department of Health and Environment will cease funding free COVID tests as of Nov. 30. How will that affect organizations and individuals, and how much will they have to pay? It depends on a number of things.”

WRAL: NC researchers will study not quarantining COVID-19 exposed students in some counties

WRAL: NC researchers will study not quarantining COVID-19 exposed students in some counties. ” Researchers in North Carolina will study a replacement for quarantine in schools that would include coronavirus testing and allow students or school staff stay in school. The ABC Science Collaborative, with permission from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, will study this method in nine school districts that require people to wear masks indoors.”

Mashable: Could your COVID-19 test be wrong?

Mashable: Could your COVID-19 test be wrong? . “No test, whether for COVID-19 or another infection or medical condition, is perfect, and false results are always possible. But the accuracy of COVID-19 tests has improved since the virus first emerged, and scientists also now have data showing that the most effective tests, like PCR and other molecular tests, are often correct. If you have reason to suspect a false result, it may make sense to confirm your results with another test. But for the most effective tests, false positive results may be particularly rare. False negatives are also relatively uncommon with these tests, especially if you have symptoms. Still, a number of individual factors affect accuracy, including what type of test you take, whether you have symptoms, and more.”

ABC News: School districts struggle to establish COVID-19 testing, frustrating parents

ABC News: School districts struggle to establish COVID-19 testing, frustrating parents. “Six months after President Joe Biden offered states $10 billion so schools could routinely test students and staff to prevent asymptomatic cases, the school year is being hindered by the virus. Some 925,000 children have become infected since school began this fall, according to data collected by the American Academy of Pediatrics, a staggering spike that has pushed many more kids into quarantine.”

New York Times: Where Are the Tests?

New York Times: Where Are the Tests?. “In Britain, France and Germany, rapid testing is widely available and inexpensive, thanks to government subsidies. People can visit testing sites, like tents outside pharmacies in France or abandoned nightclubs in Germany, and get tested at no charge…. In the U.S., by contrast, people usually take a different kind of test — known as a P.C.R. test — which must be processed by a laboratory and sometimes does not return results for more than 24 hours.”

Reuters: Vietnam’s capital ramps up testing after extending COVID-19 curbs

Reuters: Vietnam’s capital ramps up testing after extending COVID-19 curbs. ” Vietnam’s capital, Hanoi, extended COVID-19 restrictions on Monday for a further two weeks, as authorities launched a plan to conduct tests on the city’s 8 million people to try to curb a climb in infections that started in late April. The Southeast Asian country dealt successfully with the virus for much of the pandemic, but the virulent Delta variant has proved more challenging in recent months.”