Newswise: Living Donation Storytelling Project Launches Digital Library on National Donate Life Day, April 12, 2019

Newswise: Living Donation Storytelling Project Launches Digital Library on National Donate Life Day, April 12, 2019. “The Transplant Research and Education Center (TREC) at UCLA will launch the Living Donation Storytelling Project, a unique digital library of stories of people sharing their real experiences as living donors, recipients of living donor kidney transplants, and those in need of transplants. The launch of this pioneering health education tool coincides with National Donate Life (Blue & Green) Day, as part of a comprehensive campaign to raise awareness of kidney disease and make it easy for anyone to learn and share about living donation.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin revealed by new maps

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin revealed by new maps. “… a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Pharmacy and the State Cartographer’s Office have developed a prototype system that maps out trends in antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin. They drew inspiration from easy-to-read weather maps and consulted with doctors to develop the tool, which provides guidance at a glance of the likelihood a pathogen will respond to a particular drug.”

Center for Health Journalism: How to use Twitter to find a treasure trove of real patient voices

Center for Health Journalism: How to use Twitter to find a treasure trove of real patient voices. “Thousands of patients spend time on Twitter talking about their cancer, or diabetes, or psoriasis, or almost any diagnosis you can imagine. As a reporter, you can find patients to interview while absorbing valuable background here. You can find an individual to be the face of your story, or sharpen your perspective on a chronic disease by reading about the experiences of dozens of patients living with it. These insights can change the questions you ask and the direction of your reporting.”

Harvard Gazette: Tapping the collective mind

Harvard Gazette: Tapping the collective mind. “If done right, artificial intelligence could drastically reduce both systemic glitches and errors in the decision-making of individual clinicians, according to commentary written by scientists at Harvard Medical School and Google. The article, published April 4 in The New England Journal of Medicine, offers a blueprint for integrating machine learning into the practice of medicine and outlines the promises and pitfalls of a technological advance that has captivated the imaginations of bioinformaticians, clinicians, and nonscientists alike.”

EurekAlert: Virtual reality enables real-time, internal view of patient anatomy during treatment

EurekAlert: Virtual reality enables real-time, internal view of patient anatomy during treatment. “Immersive virtual reality (VR) may enable interventional radiologists to improve treatments using real-time 3D images from inside a patient’s blood vessels. New research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting shows that the interactive technology could provide faster, more efficient treatment, with less radiation exposure and greater precision, ease and confidence.”

Reuters: Google Translate mostly accurate in test with patient instructions

Reuters: Google Translate mostly accurate in test with patient instructions. “In hospitals that serve multicultural areas, doctors are increasingly looking for ways to translate their discharge instructions into languages they don’t speak. A new study finds that Google Translate may be up to the job – with some caveats.”

TechCrunch: Update regulations on medical AI, experts plead

TechCrunch: Update regulations on medical AI, experts plead . “The field of medicine is, like other industries and disciplines, in the process of incorporating AI as a standard tool, and it stands to be immensely useful — if it’s properly regulated, argue researchers. Without meaningful and standardized rules, it will be difficult to quantify benefits or prevent disasters issuing from systematic bias or poor implementation.”