Bloomberg: Google Is Training Machines to Predict When a Patient Will Die

Bloomberg: Google Is Training Machines to Predict When a Patient Will Die. “A woman with late-stage breast cancer came to a city hospital, fluids already flooding her lungs. She saw two doctors and got a radiology scan. The hospital’s computers read her vital signs and estimated a 9.3 percent chance she would die during her stay. Then came Google’s turn. An new type of algorithm created by the company read up on the woman — 175,639 data points — and rendered its assessment of her death risk: 19.9 percent. She passed away in a matter of days.”

Indiana University: Medical student founds national organization connecting LGBTQ community with health care

Indiana University: Medical student founds national organization connecting LGBTQ community with health care. “[Dustin] Nowaskie graduated in May, but before that, in the middle of his psychiatry studies, he founded OutCare, a database for LGBTQ health care. The website includes the OutList, a compilation of doctors and nurses confirmed to be culturally competent on LGBTQ health issues, as well as a database of other community and educational resources for patients and health care providers alike.”

XinhuaNet: Chinese scientists establish database to improve radiotherapy

XinhuaNet: Chinese scientists establish database to improve radiotherapy. “Chinese scientists have established an online database to help improve radiotherapy efficacy and clinical treatment of cancer. The Cancer Radiosensitivity Regulation Factors Database was jointly developed by Hefei Institute of Physical Science under the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui University. It provides information on genes, drugs, as well as other regulators that affect the radiosensitivity of each specific cancer.”

East Oregonian: News org building first statewide database of student athlete concussions

East Oregonian: News org building first statewide database of student athlete concussions. “Oregon law since 2010 required schools to implement protocols for students who suffer a concussion, including a medical release required to clear a student to play athletics. [Dr. Dereck] Earl’s practice handles a lot of that testing. A release contains the student’s name, age and grade, plus details of the injury and concussion symptoms. But Oregon’s law does not require anyone to collect or analyze the reams of medical data sitting in public schools. No one knows how many students and athletes suffer concussions. No one knows what the data could reveal about protecting kids. Portland-based journalist Lee van der Voo is working to change that.”

The Internet of (Medical) Things: Dangers, Risks, and Security Problems (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: The Internet of (Medical) Things: Dangers, Risks, and Security Problems . “You may have heard the phrase ‘your health is your wealth.’ It’s one of the reasons the US spent over $3.2 trillion on healthcare in 2015 alone. With so much money floating around, it’s only natural that a lot of businesses have entered the healthcare market—including technology companies. Medical technology sometimes feels dated, but companies are intent on dragging those devices into the 21st century. And while internet connectivity might seem like a great feature to have, there are some real dangers and issues that could surprise you.”

Wall Street Journal: NIH Seeks One Million Volunteers for Medical Database

Wall Street Journal: NIH Seeks One Million Volunteers for Medical Database. “The National Institutes of Health has begun recruiting volunteers for a $1.46 billion medical database that will eventually comprise data on more than one million people, an effort to discern the genetic underpinnings of a range of diseases and even of healthy aging. The endeavor by the nation’s leading government medical-research entity is aimed at deciphering the workings of poorly understood maladies ranging from cancers to migraines to dementia.”

HIV .gov: Comprehensive PrEP Provider Database and Locator Widget Now Available

HIV .gov: Comprehensive PrEP Provider Database and Locator Widget Now Available. “CDC’s National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) and Emory University have integrated data to provide a comprehensive, national directory of health service providers in the U.S. that offer pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV infection. Emory’s Prep Locator , created and launched in 2016, is now powered and maintained by NPIN. The integrated database includes more than 1,800 public and private PrEP providers from all 50 states, as well as U.S. territories.”