ScienceBlog: Doctors Use Existing Treatment Earlier To Save The Lives Of Covid-19 Patients

ScienceBlog: Doctors Use Existing Treatment Earlier To Save The Lives Of Covid-19 Patients. “The lives of patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are being saved by doctors who are using an existing medical treatment at an earlier stage. Dr Luigi Sedda of Lancaster University analysed the results from the team at Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (WWL). Their research has now been published in the prestigious medical journal BMJ Respiratory Open.”

Politico: Game-changing coronavirus medicine gears up for production

Politico: Game-changing coronavirus medicine gears up for production. “Amid alarming spikes in infections and a wave of new restrictions announced across Europe, some good news is emerging: Monoclonal antibodies are likely to be the first game-changing therapy against COVID-19. Big drugmakers have ample experience in manufacturing these kinds of medicines, and their existing facilities can readily be converted to produce doses of a future COVID-19 treatment, experts say.”

Washington Post: Trump politicizes promising coronavirus antibody treatments, erroneously calling them a ‘cure’

Washington Post: Trump politicizes promising coronavirus antibody treatments, erroneously calling them a ‘cure’. “Trump claimed on videos posted on Twitter Wednesday and Thursday that the drug he received, a cocktail of laboratory-made antibodies from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, is a “cure” that would soon be broadly available — even as the company disclosed that in the next few months, it would have enough supply to treat only the number of Americans sickened in the last week, or about 300,000 doses. A similar antibody drug, made by Eli Lilly & Co., shows similar promise but will also be in short supply, with about 1 million doses by year’s end.”

STAT News: Trump is receiving dexamethasone, a steroid usually given to patients with severe Covid-19

STAT News: Trump is receiving dexamethasone, a steroid usually given to patients with severe Covid-19. “Dexamethasone is generally reserved for patients who have serious disease. The National Institutes of Health’s treatment guidelines for Covid-19 say dexamethasone should be used only in hospitalized patients who are on ventilators or who require supplemental oxygen, and specifically ‘recommends against using dexamethasone for the treatment of Covid-19 in patients who do not require supplemental oxygen.'”

Washington Post: These laboratory-made antibodies are a best bet for a coronavirus treatment, but there won’t be enough

Washington Post: These laboratory-made antibodies are a best bet for a coronavirus treatment, but there won’t be enough. “Predictions about coronavirus vaccines have become almost deafening in recent weeks, but whether or not the first doses of a vaccine arrive this year, some people will continue to get sick. A medication that could prevent people from progressing to the point that they need a hospital bed or ventilator could be a bridge to a vaccine, or it could be the lifeline that could give people confidence to return to normal life even once vaccines are developed.”

Covid 19 coronavirus: Hundreds of women desperate after endometriosis treatment cancelled (New Zealand Herald)

New Zealand Herald: Covid 19 coronavirus: Hundreds of women desperate after endometriosis treatment cancelled. “Endometriosis New Zealand chief executive Deborah Bush said that during the seven-week lockdown alone the organisation received cries for help from 568 women, far more than usual, with some suicidal because they were struggling to deal with their condition.”

BBC: Coronavirus and the cancelled kidney transplant

BBC: Coronavirus and the cancelled kidney transplant. “Lockdown has resulted in a dramatic change in the lives of many young people – and this is especially true for Mali Elwy. The 19-year-old student was due to receive a kidney transplant from her brother Morgan on 24 August, but the operation has had to be cancelled due to the coronavirus crisis.”

Purdue University: Augmented reality tool shown to help surgeons remotely guide first responders in battlefield-like scenarios

Purdue University: Augmented reality tool shown to help surgeons remotely guide first responders in battlefield-like scenarios. “A Purdue University-led study is the first to show medics successfully performing surgery in life-like simulations of these war zones by receiving guidance from surgeons through an augmented reality headset. The work is joint with Purdue’s School of Industrial Engineering and the Department of Computer Science.”

Columbia University: Neutralizing Antibodies Isolated from COVID-19 Patients May Suppress Virus

Columbia University: Neutralizing Antibodies Isolated from COVID-19 Patients May Suppress Virus. “Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have isolated antibodies from several COVID-19 patients that, to date, are among the most potent in neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus. These antibodies could be produced in large quantities by pharmaceutical companies to treat patients, especially early in the course of infection, and to prevent infection, particularly in the elderly.”

EurekAlert: New antibody technology for monitoring MS patients may have potential in COVID-19 testing

EurekAlert: New antibody technology for monitoring MS patients may have potential in COVID-19 testing. “A new study led by Queen Mary University of London has demonstrated the effectiveness of using a novel light technology to monitor the presence of anti-drug antibodies in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), which can lead to drug resistance and treatment failure. The researchers say that they have also applied the technology to COVID-19 for potential use in antibody testing to determine whether someone has previously been infected with the virus.”

University of Kentucky: Don’t Let COVID-19 Fear Keep You From Seeking Medical Care

University of Kentucky: Don’t Let COVID-19 Fear Keep You From Seeking Medical Care. “The fear of contracting COVID-19 is keeping many people at home who should be coming to the Emergency Department for life-threatening conditions. Emergency departments, however, have been reorganized to isolate patients with suspected or known COVID-19 to protect those who are not infected. Yet, in the face of the pandemic, hospitalizations for stroke have decreased dramatically all over the world, including in Kentucky. Avoiding or delaying seeking emergent help can have drastic consequences because effective stroke treatments are available, but need to be started soon after the symptoms begin. It is important not to dismiss even transient symptoms because they are a warning that a major stroke may occur over the next hours or days.”

COVID-19: HAW Hamburg coordinates database with therapy literature (HAW Hamburg)

From HAW Hamburg and a press release translated from German to English: COVID-19: HAW Hamburg coordinates database with therapy literature. “In order to provide medical personnel with information on the latest literature on the subject of COVID-19, HAW Hamburg has launched the project “COVID-19 Scientific Research Database on Treatment Options” (COVID-TREAT). As part of the project, scientific literature on the treatment of COVID-19 is collected and made available online. Almost 30 universities and research centers have so far joined the concept.” When I went to the landing page of the database, it was in English.

MIT Technology Review: Many covid-19 survivors will be left traumatized by their ICU experience

MIT Technology Review: Many covid-19 survivors will be left traumatized by their ICU experience. “For those who make it out the other side, their stay in intensive care is likely to be one of the most traumatic things they will ever experience. Being able to breathe is something we take for granted. But patients who have such difficulty breathing that they need to be intubated (which involves having a tube inserted into their mouth and down their airway) often believe they are going to die at some point during their stay in intensive care. Anecdotally, ICU doctors say patients with covid-19 tend to need a particularly large amount of sedation, which damages muscles and nerves, especially in the lungs. That damage can be permanent—which can in turn undermine the patient’s mental health.”