University of Florida: Deep brain stimulation shows promise for select Tourette patients in new UF-led worldwide registry

University of Florida: Deep brain stimulation shows promise for select Tourette patients in new UF-led worldwide registry. “University of Florida neuroscientists are leading a multinational effort to track outcomes for patients with Tourette syndrome who undergo deep brain stimulation surgery, an established treatment for other movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease that’s now being tested as a potential means to decrease the motor and vocal tics of Tourette syndrome in certain patients. Data collected thus far in a registry of a small international group of patients with uncontrolled Tourette syndrome show a link between deep brain stimulation, or DBS, and some symptom improvement as well as some adverse events, the neuroscientists report in today’s issue of JAMA Neurology.”

A saving breath: The history of respiratory care (Washington Post)

New-to-me, from The Washington Post: A saving breath: The history of respiratory care. “Stethoscopes. CPR. Oxygen tanks. All make it possible for doctors to diagnose and treat conditions of the lungs, including tuberculosis and other diseases that claimed millions of lives before advances in respiratory medicine and therapy. There’s a fascinating history here. You can delve into that history — and learn more about the researchers and medical professionals who help people catch their breath today — at the American Association for Respiratory Care’s online museum.”

Nursing Times: Nursing from the past recorded on new local history website

Nursing Times: Nursing from the past recorded on new local history website. “Photographs of nursing staff taken at Christmas time during the 1920s and 1930s are among those featured in a new digital archive of the history of healthcare services in Salisbury. The new website has been launched by the Salisbury District Hospital ArtCare team to give an insight into the development of health services in and around Salisbury over the last 250 years.”

STAT: Deal struck to mine cancer patient database for new treatment insights

STAT: Deal struck to mine cancer patient database for new treatment insights . “he plan took shape over a decade: A prominent society of cancer doctors would create a massive patient database and use it to discover the most effective treatments for specific cancers. The first part of the effort worked — the American Society of Clinical Oncology secured data from more than 100 oncology practices nationwide. But it has since struggled to reconcile myriad conflicts in language and formatting, leaving crucial insights buried in the records. On Thursday, the 40,000-member organization unveiled an unusual arrangement to solve that problem by partnering with two private companies that will pay for the rights to analyze the database, known as CancerLinQ, and deliver clinical information to doctors nationwide.”

Hong Kong Standard: Database rates Chinese medicine

Hong Kong Standard: Database rates Chinese medicine. “Chinese University of Hong Kong researchers have developed Asia’s first global online database on the effectiveness of Chinese medicine. The bilingual evidence-based platform, ‘Integrative Medicine Clinical Evidence Portal,’ comprises more than 200 experiments on how effective Chinese medicine is in different situations.”

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community . “The NIH Clinical Center recently released over 100,000 anonymized chest x-ray images and their corresponding data to the scientific community. The release will allow researchers across the country and around the world to freely access the datasets and increase their ability to teach computers how to detect and diagnose disease. Ultimately, this artificial intelligence mechanism can lead to clinicians making better diagnostic decisions for patients.”

ScienceBlog: WhatsApp Use By Argentina Ambulances Associated With Faster Heart Attack Treatment

ScienceBlog: WhatsApp Use By Argentina Ambulances Associated With Faster Heart Attack Treatment. “WhatsApp use by ambulance doctors in Argentina was associated with faster treatment of heart attack and lower mortality in an observational study presented today at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC 2017). The free messaging application was used to send diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) directly to hospital catheterisation (cath) laboratories, enabling patients to bypass the emergency department.”