British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours

British Library: Antoine de Lonhy and the Saluces Hours . “The Saluces Hours is a manuscript with a complicated genesis. It was produced in Savoy, which in the 15th century was in independent duchy, and today comprises an area of southeast France and northwest Italy. The manuscript was originally begun around the 1440s, several decades before Lonhy’s involvement in the project. In this first stage, the text was probably completed and the process of illuminating the book begun.” Breathtaking! I probably say that half the time for illuminated manuscripts, but it’s always true.

University of Colorado Colorado Springs: Immersive Global Middle Ages institute will recreate worlds that no longer exist

University of Colorado Colorado Springs: Immersive Global Middle Ages institute will recreate worlds that no longer exist. “The project, called Immersive Global Middle Ages, aims to create new ways of experiencing medieval history on a global scale, even though these societies have faded from existence. Supported by a $250,000 award from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, the project will teach participants to use advanced computer modeling and virtual reality tools to reconstruct global societies from 500-1500 C.E.”

An Oxford Historian: The Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds

New-to-me, from An Oxford Historian: The Corpus of Early Medieval Coin Finds. “Run by Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum, this site provides a database for single coin finds from the years c. 410 to 1180. Far more specifically focused than the PAS, this is the perfect resource for anyone interested in numismatics more specifically. Included in each entry is a photograph of both sides of the coin, along with a lot of background information, and a useful catalogue number for further research.”

Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England

Thanks to Diane R. We toss resources back and forth to each other via email and she sent me a gem yesterday from Medievalists: Medieval database revived – examines writings from early medieval England. “Created in the 1990s, the loss of the ground-breaking Fontes Anglo-Saxonici database in 2018 made it virtually impossible once again to trace the precise borrowings within the early medieval literary heritage of the British Isles. However, in a multi-disciplinary project involving medieval scholars and computer scientists, researchers and enthusiasts of the period can once again cross-reference medieval authors with their global counterparts from whom they often ‘borrowed’ long passages in pre-plagiarism times.”

Phys .org: New evidence helps form digital reconstruction of most important medieval shrine

Phys .org: New evidence helps form digital reconstruction of most important medieval shrine. “The shrine of Saint Thomas Becket, the most important pilgrimage destination in medieval England—visited for hundreds of years by pilgrims seeking miraculous healing—has been digitally reconstructed for the public, according to how experts believe it appeared before its destruction.”

Aleteia: Treasured art collection at Princeton now free online for limited time

Alteia: Treasured art collection at Princeton now free online for limited time. “The Index of Medieval Art, a treasured collection of medieval artwork at Princeton University, is normally available for subscription fees starting at $250 a year for individuals. Now, due to the coronavirus pandemic restrictions, it is free for a limited time period. The free period has just been extended until the end of June, said Pamela A. Patton, Director of Princeton University’s Index of Medieval Art. David Clayton’s Way of Beauty blog earlier had reported that it was free until June 1.”

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Medievalists .net: Project breathing new life into forgotten medieval chants

Medievalists .net: Project breathing new life into forgotten medieval chants. “The Amra project, led by music historian Dr Ann Buckley at Trinity’s Medieval History Research Centre, is aiming to digitise and make freely available online over 300 manuscripts containing liturgical material associated with some 40 Irish saints which are located in research libraries across Europe.”

Indiana University Bloomington: Grant aids project by IU, other institutions to digitize medieval manuscripts

Indiana University Bloomington: Grant aids project by IU, other institutions to digitize medieval manuscripts. “Indiana University Bloomington and a consortium of higher-learning institutions have received a three-year grant for The Peripheral Manuscripts Project: Digitizing Medieval Manuscript Collections in the Midwest, which will create a digital repository and catalog of medieval manuscripts across Midwestern collections.”

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. “Led by Lehigh University, a partnership of 15 Philadelphia-area libraries has scanned and digitized more than 160,000 pages from 475 original manuscripts, the earliest dating to the ninth century. The hand-lettered and illustrated pages range from brightly hued, gold-leafed illuminated works of art to functional texts intended for students of science, philosophy and religion.”

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online. “The British Library holds one of the most significant collections of manuscripts written in Middle English. Thanks to a very generous grant by The American Trust for the British Library, we have recently been able to digitize a sizeable number of them, the first batch of which can now be viewed on our Digitised Manuscripts site. ”

Asbarez: ‘The Christian Architecture of the Levant’ Website Launched

Asbarez: ‘The Christian Architecture of the Levant’ Website Launched. “The initial 3,300 photographs, plans and maps of 118 sites presented on the Website are composed of secular, ecclesiastical and military construction within Turkey, from the Byzantine, Cilician Armenian and late Medieval periods. By exposing this material to the widest possible audience, the donors hope to encourage dialogue, provide documentation for publications, and facilitate efforts for the preservation of these endangered monuments.”