Phys .org: New evidence helps form digital reconstruction of most important medieval shrine

Phys .org: New evidence helps form digital reconstruction of most important medieval shrine. “The shrine of Saint Thomas Becket, the most important pilgrimage destination in medieval England—visited for hundreds of years by pilgrims seeking miraculous healing—has been digitally reconstructed for the public, according to how experts believe it appeared before its destruction.”

Aleteia: Treasured art collection at Princeton now free online for limited time

Alteia: Treasured art collection at Princeton now free online for limited time. “The Index of Medieval Art, a treasured collection of medieval artwork at Princeton University, is normally available for subscription fees starting at $250 a year for individuals. Now, due to the coronavirus pandemic restrictions, it is free for a limited time period. The free period has just been extended until the end of June, said Pamela A. Patton, Director of Princeton University’s Index of Medieval Art. David Clayton’s Way of Beauty blog earlier had reported that it was free until June 1.”

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Medievalists .net: Project breathing new life into forgotten medieval chants

Medievalists .net: Project breathing new life into forgotten medieval chants. “The Amra project, led by music historian Dr Ann Buckley at Trinity’s Medieval History Research Centre, is aiming to digitise and make freely available online over 300 manuscripts containing liturgical material associated with some 40 Irish saints which are located in research libraries across Europe.”

Indiana University Bloomington: Grant aids project by IU, other institutions to digitize medieval manuscripts

Indiana University Bloomington: Grant aids project by IU, other institutions to digitize medieval manuscripts. “Indiana University Bloomington and a consortium of higher-learning institutions have received a three-year grant for The Peripheral Manuscripts Project: Digitizing Medieval Manuscript Collections in the Midwest, which will create a digital repository and catalog of medieval manuscripts across Midwestern collections.”

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts

Lehigh University: Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts. “Led by Lehigh University, a partnership of 15 Philadelphia-area libraries has scanned and digitized more than 160,000 pages from 475 original manuscripts, the earliest dating to the ninth century. The hand-lettered and illustrated pages range from brightly hued, gold-leafed illuminated works of art to functional texts intended for students of science, philosophy and religion.”

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online

British Library: Middle English manuscripts online. “The British Library holds one of the most significant collections of manuscripts written in Middle English. Thanks to a very generous grant by The American Trust for the British Library, we have recently been able to digitize a sizeable number of them, the first batch of which can now be viewed on our Digitised Manuscripts site. ”

Asbarez: ‘The Christian Architecture of the Levant’ Website Launched

Asbarez: ‘The Christian Architecture of the Levant’ Website Launched. “The initial 3,300 photographs, plans and maps of 118 sites presented on the Website are composed of secular, ecclesiastical and military construction within Turkey, from the Byzantine, Cilician Armenian and late Medieval periods. By exposing this material to the widest possible audience, the donors hope to encourage dialogue, provide documentation for publications, and facilitate efforts for the preservation of these endangered monuments.”

Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge (British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog)

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge. “For the last three years, the ‘Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge’ project has been investigating the large number of manuscripts written in insular scripts between the mid-7th and the mid-9th centuries. The project aims to examine knowledge exchange in early medieval Europe through analysis of these manuscripts. Some of the manuscripts were written in Britain and Ireland, but many were written in Francia and northern Italy, in monasteries which had been founded by missionaries from Ireland and the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.”

British Library Medieval manuscripts blog: Even more digitised manuscripts

British Library Medieval manuscripts blog: Even more digitised manuscripts. “Long-term readers of this Blog may be aware that we periodically publish lists of our digitised manuscripts. Our last one was published in July 2018 and the wait for a new one is over — here are up-to-date lists of manuscript hyperlinks to make it easier for you to explore our amazing digitised treasures.”

British Library: Why we love the Harley Irish Gospels

British Library: Why we love the Harley Irish Gospels. “How better to celebrate St Patrick’s Day than to announce the digitisation of two important Irish manuscripts from the British Library’s collections? Harley MS 1023 and Harley MS 1802 were both made in the 12th century in Armagh, St Patrick’s foundation and medieval cult centre.”

RTE: Rare medieval manuscripts answer prayers of researchers into history of Irish saints

RTE: Rare medieval manuscripts answer prayers of researchers into history of Irish saints . “Research into ‘forgotten’ medieval chants and prayers is shedding new light on the history of the cult of Irish saints, including St Patrick. Trinity College Dublin’s Amra project is aiming to digitise and make freely available over 300 manuscripts containing liturgical material associated with some 40 Irish saints.”

British Library: Explore our Anglo-Saxons webspace

British Library: Explore our Anglo-Saxons webspace. “Would you like to find out more about the Anglo-Saxons? Have you been mesmerised by our recent blockbuster exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War, or are you doing research into some aspect of early medieval culture? If so, you may be interested in the British Library’s new webspace devoted to the Anglo-Saxons. Already published are a number of articles, on subjects as diverse as music, Anglo-Saxon women, and the Battle of Hastings, together with collection items and biographies. In the near future we intend to add more material, so (literally) please watch this space …”

Phys .org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets

Phys. org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets. “Stabbed by a lover with a fish-gutting knife. Beaten to death for littering with eel skins. Shot with an arrow during a student street brawl. Shanked by a sore loser after late-night backgammon. These were just some of the ways to die violently in the city of London during the 14th century, as catalogued in the ‘Coroners’ Rolls’: the records of the medieval official tasked with documenting sudden and unnatural death – whether accident, suicide or homicide. Now, University of Cambridge criminologist Professor Manuel Eisner has plotted all cases of murder from the surviving rolls – covering the years 1300 to 1340 – onto a digital map of the old city to show for the first time the ‘hot spots’ of lethal violence in medieval London.”