Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge (British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog)

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge. “For the last three years, the ‘Insular Manuscripts: Networks of Knowledge’ project has been investigating the large number of manuscripts written in insular scripts between the mid-7th and the mid-9th centuries. The project aims to examine knowledge exchange in early medieval Europe through analysis of these manuscripts. Some of the manuscripts were written in Britain and Ireland, but many were written in Francia and northern Italy, in monasteries which had been founded by missionaries from Ireland and the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.”

British Library Medieval manuscripts blog: Even more digitised manuscripts

British Library Medieval manuscripts blog: Even more digitised manuscripts. “Long-term readers of this Blog may be aware that we periodically publish lists of our digitised manuscripts. Our last one was published in July 2018 and the wait for a new one is over — here are up-to-date lists of manuscript hyperlinks to make it easier for you to explore our amazing digitised treasures.”

British Library: Why we love the Harley Irish Gospels

British Library: Why we love the Harley Irish Gospels. “How better to celebrate St Patrick’s Day than to announce the digitisation of two important Irish manuscripts from the British Library’s collections? Harley MS 1023 and Harley MS 1802 were both made in the 12th century in Armagh, St Patrick’s foundation and medieval cult centre.”

RTE: Rare medieval manuscripts answer prayers of researchers into history of Irish saints

RTE: Rare medieval manuscripts answer prayers of researchers into history of Irish saints . “Research into ‘forgotten’ medieval chants and prayers is shedding new light on the history of the cult of Irish saints, including St Patrick. Trinity College Dublin’s Amra project is aiming to digitise and make freely available over 300 manuscripts containing liturgical material associated with some 40 Irish saints.”

British Library: Explore our Anglo-Saxons webspace

British Library: Explore our Anglo-Saxons webspace. “Would you like to find out more about the Anglo-Saxons? Have you been mesmerised by our recent blockbuster exhibition, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War, or are you doing research into some aspect of early medieval culture? If so, you may be interested in the British Library’s new webspace devoted to the Anglo-Saxons. Already published are a number of articles, on subjects as diverse as music, Anglo-Saxon women, and the Battle of Hastings, together with collection items and biographies. In the near future we intend to add more material, so (literally) please watch this space …”

Phys .org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets

Phys. org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets. “Stabbed by a lover with a fish-gutting knife. Beaten to death for littering with eel skins. Shot with an arrow during a student street brawl. Shanked by a sore loser after late-night backgammon. These were just some of the ways to die violently in the city of London during the 14th century, as catalogued in the ‘Coroners’ Rolls’: the records of the medieval official tasked with documenting sudden and unnatural death – whether accident, suicide or homicide. Now, University of Cambridge criminologist Professor Manuel Eisner has plotted all cases of murder from the surviving rolls – covering the years 1300 to 1340 – onto a digital map of the old city to show for the first time the ‘hot spots’ of lethal violence in medieval London.”

British Library: Launch of The Polonsky Foundation Pre-1200 Project

Mentioned this back in 2016 when it was announced, so happy to mention its launch. British Library: Launch of The Polonsky Foundation Pre-1200 Project. “Today we are celebrating with our esteemed colleagues from the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Together we have digitised and re-catalogued 800 medieval manuscripts from England and France. We have also created two bilingual web resources making these manuscripts available freely and interpreting their significance.”