Medievalists: 61 Medieval Manuscripts digitized and available online

Medievalists: 61 Medieval Manuscripts digitized and available online. “One of the largest databases of medieval manuscripts has added 61 new items to its collection. They include manuscripts from the Franciscan order as well as fragments dating back to the eighth century. The digitized manuscripts were added to e-codices: The Virtual Manuscript Library of Switzerland, which is run out of the University of Fribourg. The new additions bring their collection to over 2500 items.”

University of Cambridge: Medieval Murder Maps

University of Cambridge: Medieval Murder Maps. “A new website, launched by Cambridge’s Violence Research Centre, allows users to compare the causes and patterns of urban violence in medieval England across three cities for the first time. The site features a new map of York’s homicides during its 14th century ‘golden age’ when – driven by trade and textiles – the city flourished as Black Death subsided.”

Dalhousie University: Dal researcher leads global project to empower scholars of medieval chant

Dalhousie University: Dal researcher leads global project to empower scholars of medieval chant. “Over the next seven years, Dr. [Jennifer] Bain will create an online platform that links and synergizes plainchant databases around the world. The new digital tool will provide scholars with a vast electronic resource to deepen their understanding of the a cappella chants and those who created and recited them.”

Fordham University: Seeing Castles on the Streets of New York

Fordham University: Seeing Castles on the Streets of New York. “When you think of the Middle Ages, you likely picture knights, swords, and castles— not things you’re likely to find in New York City. The Medieval New York Project would beg to disagree. The project, a three-way collaborative effort between Fordham’s Center for Medieval Studies Department, the Office of Information Technology, and New Rochelle High School, is striving to show the public that there actually are medieval elements all across the city.”

Courthouse News Service: Comedic history found in sobering tale of medieval scribe’s private library

Courthouse News Service: Comedic history found in sobering tale of medieval scribe’s private library. “Centuries before ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail’ hit theaters, a medieval priest transcribed three brutal tales from a traveling minstrel with one recounting how a deadly run-in with a killer bunny ended with villagers bringing out their dead.”

Medieval and Renaissance Women: full list of the charters and rolls (British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog)

British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog: Medieval and Renaissance Women: full list of the charters and rolls. “… we are thrilled to release a list of all the rolls and charters digitised as part of our Medieval and Renaissance Women project. There are 25 rolls and 219 charters in total, in addition to the 93 manuscript volumes that we announced in a previous blogpost.”

British Library Blog: From Julian of Norwich to Eleanor Cobham: more magnificent manuscripts online

British Library Blog: From Julian of Norwich to Eleanor Cobham: more magnificent manuscripts online. “Readers of this Blog may know about out ambitious project to digitise a selection of manuscripts, rolls and charters connected with Medieval and Renaissance Women. Here we reveal another ten volumes that are now available online, including important literary manuscripts, a guide for female recluses, obituary calendars, and a volume with its own embroidered bookbinding.”

University of Leiden: Medieval manuscripts made available in Europeana

University of Leiden: Medieval manuscripts made available in Europeana. “Over 600 manuscripts and early prints have been made digitally available by Leiden University Libraries (UBL) via the Europeana platform. In the project ‘The Art of Reading in the Middle Ages’ (ARMA), seven European heritage institutions added 30,000 digitised medieval items to Europeana’s database and improved the quality of another 30,000, thus bringing medieval reading culture within the grasp of users.”

Panizzi Lectures – Drawing Conclusions: Diagrams in Medieval Art and Thought (British Library)

British Library: Panizzi Lectures – Drawing Conclusions: Diagrams in Medieval Art and Thought. “Diagrams constitute an omnipresent feature of medieval art and thought. From Antiquity onwards, the forms and procedures of geometric reasoning held a privileged place in the pursuit of truth, the understanding of which remained closely linked to ideals of beauty and perfection. Drawing on the collections of the British Library, whose holdings provide virtually comprehensive coverage of all ramifications of the diagrammatic tradition, this series of lectures examines the practical, theoretical and aesthetic dimensions of medieval diagrams as matrices of meaning and patterns of thought informing diverse areas of medieval culture.” All the lectures will be livestreamed. They’re free but registration is required.

The Conversation: Why so many medieval manuscripts feature doodles – and what they reveal

The Conversation: Why so many medieval manuscripts feature doodles – and what they reveal. “Although you wouldn’t dare doodle on a medieval manuscript today, squiggly lines (sometimes resembling fish or even elongated people), mini-drawings (a knight fighting a snail, for instance), and random objects appear quite often in medieval books. Usually found in the flyleaves or margins, doodles can often give medievalists (specialists in medieval history and culture) important insights into how people in earlier centuries understood and reacted to the narrative on the page.”

Trinity College Dublin: New research project to lay foundations for next generation of Old and Middle English scholarship

Trinity College Dublin: New research project to lay foundations for next generation of Old and Middle English scholarship. “Entitled ‘Searobend: Linked Metadata for English-Language Texts, 1000-1300’, the project will use techniques from computer science to link fifteen major resources for the study of English texts from the High Middle Ages (c. 1000-1300).”