Carnegie Mellon University: New Technology Makes Internet Memes Accessible for People With Visual Impairments

Carnegie Mellon University: New Technology Makes Internet Memes Accessible for People With Visual Impairments. “People with visual impairments use social media like everyone else, often with the help of screen reader software. But that technology falls short when it encounters memes, which don’t include alternate text, or alt text, to describe what’s depicted in the image. To counter this, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method to automatically identify memes and apply prewritten templates to add descriptive alt text, making them intelligible via existing assistive technologies.”

MakeUseOf: 6 Best Websites to Find New, Trending, and Weird Memes

MakeUseOf: 6 Best Websites to Find New, Trending, and Weird Memes. “Memes have become a unique type of language on the internet, letting people express opinions in a short but funny image. And like any language, it’s constantly evolving. If you want to know the latest memes or find unique ones, you’ve come to the right place.”

TechCrunch: Facebook’s latest experiment is a meme creation app, Whale

TechCrunch: Facebook’s latest experiment is a meme creation app, Whale. “Facebook’s NPE Team, a division inside the social networking giant that will build experimental consumer-facing social apps, has now added a third app to its lineup with the launch of meme creation app Whale. Currently, the app allows users to decorate photos with text and stickers in order to create memes that can be shared to social media or texted to friends.”

Instagram news memes: explore new ways to attract younger audiences (Journalism .co .uk)

Journalism .co .uk: Instagram news memes: explore new ways to attract younger audiences. “As younger people increasingly turn away from traditional media formats and more towards social media, news organisations are exploring new ways to remain relevant. Danish local news station TV2 Østjylland thinks it has found the answer in memes.”

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots. “Researchers from the University of Delaware published a study online last month suggesting memes can be effectively used to tell humans and bots apart. They propose memes could be ‘one of the strongest techniques to distinguish between a human and a bot based on conscience and interpretation.'”

BuzzFeed News: She Stole Something While Struggling With Heroin Addiction. Cops Turned Her Into A Facebook Meme.

BuzzFeed News: She Stole Something While Struggling With Heroin Addiction. Cops Turned Her Into A Facebook Meme.. “Wanted posters, the distracted boyfriend meme, #ThugThursday. Police departments have discovered how Facebook makes negative or extreme content go viral. Experts say it ruins people’s trust in cops.”

How memes got weaponized: A short history (MIT Technology Review)

MIT Technology Review: How memes got weaponized: A short history. “While today we tend to think of memes as funny images online, Richard Dawkins coined the term back in 1976 in his book The Selfish Gene, where he described how culture is transmitted through generations. In his definition, memes are ‘units of culture’ spread through the diffusion of ideas. Memes are particularly salient online because the internet crystallizes them as artifacts of communication and accelerates their distribution through subcultures.”