The Tab: This is how to do that hilarious AI meme generator that everyone is doing on Twitter

The Tab: This is how to do that hilarious AI meme generator that everyone is doing on Twitter. “The generator, called This Meme Does Not Exist, is created by a site called site is called imgflip, who say on their site that the memes are generated by ‘a deep artificial neural network. Nothing about the text generation is hardcoded, except that the maximum text length is limited for sanity. The model uses character-level prediction, so you can specify prefix text of one or more characters to influence the text generated.'”

Mashable: 17 of the best Zoom memes that’ll make you laugh while working from home

Mashable: 17 of the best Zoom memes that’ll make you laugh while working from home. “There’s nothing quite so 2020 as Zoom memes. Sure, we’re all stuck inside and on endless video calls but, hey, at least we’re getting some internet content out of it! To be fair, Zoom memes are good mostly because it’s so much of reality these days. There are whole Facebook groups dedicated to the genre and we at Mashable even went out of our way to gift you great backgrounds. Without further ado, here are 17 of our favorites.”

SupChina: Chinese Nationalists And Thai Meme-Creators Face Off On Twitter

SupChina: Chinese Nationalists And Thai Meme-Creators Face Off On Twitter. “When Thai actor Vachirawit Chivaaree retweeted a photo of Hong Kong last week, he didn’t intend to set off a Thai-China political dispute. But what happened next was one part dystopian sci-fi, and one part a regular occurrence in the age of Chinese nationalist trolls: They attacked. He apologized. And a bizarre sequence of events happened. Here’s how the saga unfolded.”

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords

New York Times: Meet Your Meme Lords. “Future researchers can rest easy: Know Your Meme, Urban Dictionary, Creepypasta and Cute Overload have all been preserved by the Library of Congress. So has the band website for They Might Be Giants and the entire published output of The Toast, the humor site that shut down in 2016. And while the Library of Congress owns a rare print copy of the Gutenberg Bible, the web archive features the LOLCat Bible Translation Project, which rendered the bible in LOLspeak.”

CNET: Coronavirus memes help an isolated world cope with ‘existential dread’

CNET: Coronavirus memes help an isolated world cope with ‘existential dread’. “As COVID-19 spreads to more cities and claims more lives, meme accounts across Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Reddit have cranked out more content seeking light and humor amid the darkness and uncertainty. Memes poking fun at everything from hoarding toilet paper to going stir crazy while in quarantine have dominated social media feeds.”

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News. “‘Westchester memes is how people know what’s going on,’ Quinn Muller said. She’s 14 and lives in Sleepy Hollow, in Westchester County. She, and many of her peers in towns just north of New York City, are using local meme pages as their news source for updates about the new coronavirus.”

Towards Data Science: Explore a database of the most popular “Florida Man” headlines

Towards Data Science: Explore a database of the most popular “Florida Man” headlines. “For almost a decade, ‘Florida Man’ has been a mainstay antihero of internet culture. Headlines like ‘Florida man too fat for jail’ and ‘Florida man steals dinosaur bones’ are easy fodder for meme-ification. In early 2013, ‘Florida Man’ was canonized on Twitter with @_FloridaMan and on Reddit with the r/FloridaMan subreddit. And after seven years of retweeting and upvoting, we can gather the most popular headlines to see what makes a ‘Florida Man’ headline successful.”