Rolling Stone: How a Government Agency’s Offbeat Twitter Memes Landed in the Library of Congress

Rolling Stone: How a Government Agency’s Offbeat Twitter Memes Landed in the Library of Congress. “In September 2016, Joseph Galbo put a baby in a forcefield. It was the second day of Baby Safety Month, and Galbo, the social media specialist for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, had gotten the OK from his director to try out a new way of communicating to the American public the best ways to protect a newborn. The photo he posted had the goofy aesthetic of a slapdash Photoshop job — a smiling baby with a glowing aura nestled in the center of a blue orb — while the CPSC’s logo at the bottom lent the image the added feel of a low-budget PSA.” Gloriously weird.

University of Michigan: How students used social media and memes to change a University of Michigan sexual health policy

Michigan Advance: How students used social media and memes to change a University of Michigan sexual health policy . “The University of Michigan has a long history of politically active movements, from the 1962 Port Huron Statement, the first-ever teach-in in 1965 and picket-sign style protests to fight segregation. But today, students have a new form of political creativity: memes, Twitter updates and Instagram stories.”

Fashionista: The Internet Helped Turn Fashion Into One Big, Self-Aware Meme

Fashionista: The Internet Helped Turn Fashion Into One Big, Self-Aware Meme. “Our collective obsession with all things archival was born, ostensibly, from a reverence for fashion’s great designers, which is what makes the current state of archive-referential fashion so curious. The appreciation for the clothing of yore was largely fostered in online communities where interested parties could discuss early-2000s Raf Simons, reminisce about John Galliano’s years at Dior or share their Japan-based proxies for rare Comme des Garçons. But, the internet — the very thing that helped democratize fashion and spread the gospel of revered designers in the first place — is also what’s at the root of the very odd moment we’re witnessing across the industry.” Unusually scholarly and erudite.

CNET: Memes on Instagram, Reddit bring comfort to people struggling with depression

CNET: Memes on Instagram, Reddit bring comfort to people struggling with depression. “Memes tackling existential crises and mental health have become an outlet for people seeking light in even the darkest struggles. Topics like depression, debt and failed relationships are regularly explored on meme pages on Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and Twitter. The memes help to defuse situations with humor and to reinforce common experiences, bringing people from all walks of life together.”

The Atlantic: Instagram Wants Memers to Like It Again

The Atlantic: Instagram Wants Memers to Like It Again. “Today, the company is announcing that it’s looking to hire its first-ever strategic-partnerships manager specifically to focus on meme accounts and what the company calls ‘digital publishers,’ social-based media companies including @TheShadeRoom, @OverheardLA, @CommentsbyCelebs, and @Betches.”