Monash University: New study finds ancient Australian Aboriginal memory tool superior to “memory palace” learning among medical students

Monash University: New study finds ancient Australian Aboriginal memory tool superior to “memory palace” learning among medical students. “The researchers found that the students who used the Aboriginal technique for remembering – ie a narrative plus locations from around the campus – were almost three times more likely to correctly remember the entire list than they were prior to training (odds ratio – 2.8). The students using the memory palace technique were about twice as likely to get a perfect score after training (2.1), while the control group improved by about 50% (1.5) over their pre-training performance.”

The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research

The Conversation: Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories – new research. “Memories are often considered very personal and private. Yet, in the past few years, people have got used to notifications from social media or phone galleries telling them they have a ‘memory’. These repackaged versions of the past affect not just what we remember but also the attachments we have with those memories. In a new study, we found social media has the potential to change how people feel about their memories.”

Musical memories refreshed: Olo Radio gives Last FM users a new way to interact with their music-streaming history (Simon Fraser University)

Simon Fraser University: Musical memories refreshed: Olo Radio gives Last FM users a new way to interact with their music-streaming history. “Imagine accessing an archive of all the songs you’ve ever listened to—organized by the time of day, day of the year, or time of your life that you listened to them. With Olo Radio, a device designed by School of Interactive Arts and Technology professor William Odom and collaborator Tijs Duel, you can do just that. Olo Radio links to a user’s Last.fm account and uses simple metadata, including the time and date a song was played, to organize a personal music archive and make it accessible in a new way.”

Hypebeast: Instagram Launches “On This Day” Function to Bring Back Your Favorite Memories

Hypebeast: Instagram Launches “On This Day” Function to Bring Back Your Favorite Memories. “If you’re a fan of Throwback Thursdays, you’ll love what Instagram has just implemented. Much like its Facebook counterpart, the mobile social platform will now suggest old memories from your feed through a new function called ‘On This Day,’ which comes as part of the new Create mode Instagram is pushing out.”

BBC: Fake news is ‘reinforced by false memories’

BBC: Fake news is ‘reinforced by false memories’. “A study into false memories highlights the risks of ‘fake news’ spreading via social media. Volunteers were shown fabricated news reports in the week before Ireland’s 2018 abortion law referendum. Nearly half of them subsequently claimed to have had prior memories of at least one of the made-up events detailed.”

Wired: The Rise and Fall of Facebook’s Memory Economy

Wired: The Rise and Fall of Facebook’s Memory Economy . “Facebook’s Memories feature—where it shows you pictures and posts from a day in the recent or far-gone past—used to be my favorite thing about the platform. I mean, I have posted some hilarious things that my son said when he was little, and that time I went on a reporting trip to Area 51 was seriously cool. Heck, I’ve reposted it three years in a row. Now, though, I think Memories is the platform’s most cynical element. It’s a cheap ploy to keep us creating new posts, keep us interested, at a time when our interest is starting to drift away.”

HeraldReview: Through Apps And Workshops Museums Help Better The Lives Of Americans Living With Dementia

HeraldReview: Through Apps And Workshops Museums Help Better The Lives Of Americans Living With Dementia. “On Sept. 24, the Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS) will launch the U.S. version of the award-winning ‘House of Memories’ dementia awareness program, originally developed in the U.K. by National Museums Liverpool to provide person-centered care for people to live well with dementia. The program offers training workshops, resources and activities, including the ‘My House of Memories’ app, the first of its kind in the world. The app features more than 100 interactive pages of MNHS collection items, which can help those living with dementia draw on memories to create personal connections with family, friends and caregivers.”

CBC: How a stationary bike, paired with Google Street View, helps seniors with dementia

CBC: How a stationary bike, paired with Google Street View, helps seniors with dementia. “Residents at an Oshawa, Ont., retirement home are among the first people in the country to try an innovative therapy for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients called the BikeAround. The device combines a stationary bicycle, a dome-shaped projector and Google Street View technology. Users sit on the bike and are able to pedal through video of meaningful destinations — a childhood home, a vacation destination, the spot they were married — projected onto the screen in front of them.”

Wired: Burning Memories

Wired: Burning Memories. “On Sunday night, October 8, my parents’ house in Napa burned to the ground in the wildfire. For my mom and dad, now in their eighties, the place had been a retirement escape from the hurlyburly of New York. My wife and I were married there 23 years ago, in the hillside living room looking out over a vine-carpeted valley. The fire turned this refuge into a heap of tile and ash. It also torched our family history: a mountain of scrapbooks, photo prints, and travel diaries that we will never mine again.”

Phys .org: Remembering the need to forget

Phys.org: Remembering the need to forget . “We are built to forget – it is a psychological necessity. But in a social media world that captures – and, more importantly, remembers – everything we say and do, forgetting is becoming a thing of the past. If we lose the ability to forget our past, we lose the ability to construct our own stories – a part of what it means to be human, warned one Western researcher.”

How to Block Date Ranges for Facebook’s “On this Day” Feature

Eric Meyer has written a quick article to show how you can block specific date ranges from Facebook’s “On this Day” feature. “Suppose you use Facebook (statistically, odds are at least 1 in 5 that you do). Further, suppose you have a period of your life, or even more than one, that you’d rather not be mined by Facebook’s ‘On This Day’ feature. Here’s how to set a blackout for any period(s) of time.”