Science Blog: Drawing Is Better Than Writing For Memory Retention

Science Blog: Drawing Is Better Than Writing For Memory Retention. “Older adults who take up drawing could enhance their memory, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren’t good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images.”

The Guardian: Font of all knowledge? Researchers develop typeface they say can boost memory

The Guardian: Font of all knowledge? Researchers develop typeface they say can boost memory. “Australian researchers say they have developed a new tool that could help students cramming for exams – a font that helps the reader remember information. Melbourne-based RMIT University’s behavioural business lab and design school teamed up to create ‘Sans Forgetica’, which they say uses psychological and design theories to aid memory retention.”

University of California: Thank Instagram and Snapchat for your fading memories

University of California: Thank Instagram and Snapchat for your fading memories. “How much do you value your memories? Enough to forego that next amazing Instagram pic Research by UC Santa Cruz doctoral student Julia Soares has found compelling evidence that the act of taking a photograph impairs people’s memories of the event.”

Arizona State University: Why are humans so obsessed with self-documenting?

Arizona State University: Why are humans so obsessed with self-documenting?. “A small newborn, Sophie, wrapped in baby blankets and with a full head of hair, was photographed by her father Philippe Kahn on June 11, 1997. What’s unique about the image is Kahn took it with a makeshift cell phone camera that sent the image immediately to all of his friends and family in real time, making it the first cell phone photograph. Now it seems taking photos with our cell phones is as natural as breathing, and people born less than 21 years ago, like Sophie, will likely share hundreds — if not thousands — of photos using their phones in their lives and never give it a second thought.”

The Telegraph: BBC launch archive of memorable programmes to help dementia sufferers

The Telegraph: BBC launch archive of memorable programmes to help dementia sufferers. “…fond memories inspired by footage of Sir David Attenborough’s encounter with gorillas, Kenneth Clark strolling through Civilisations and the theme tune to the Old Grey Whistle Test have been shown to have a greater purpose: helping those with dementia. The BBC has launched a permanent archive of pictures, audio and video clips as part of a project to help people with dementia, their family and carers, using their extensive archive to spark conversation.”

Phys .org: Remembering the need to forget

Phys.org: Remembering the need to forget . “We are built to forget – it is a psychological necessity. But in a social media world that captures – and, more importantly, remembers – everything we say and do, forgetting is becoming a thing of the past. If we lose the ability to forget our past, we lose the ability to construct our own stories – a part of what it means to be human, warned one Western researcher.”

Study finds that the more you Google, the more likely you are to keep Googling

Is it like Pringles? Study finds that the more you Google, the more likely you are to keep Googling. “People who use the internet to retrieve information are more likely to use it again and less likely to use their memory, according to a study by UC Santa Cruz psychology professor Benjamin Storm. Published in the journal Memory, Storm finds the internet is changing the way people learn, remember, and solve problems.”