The Guardian: Omicron brings fresh concern for US mental heath after ‘grim two years’

The Guardian: Omicron brings fresh concern for US mental heath after ‘grim two years’. “Even though many people in the United States are now vaccinated against the virus and able to engage in something like a pre-pandemic lifestyle, the country’s population continues to suffer from anxiety and depression. And now there are fresh worries about the Omicron variant and the impact it could have on public life this winter. The new variant – which, early reports suggest, could be more contagious than previous strains – is already spreading in the US, triggering concern. If Omicron does lead to another Covid-19 surge, the impact on mental health will be serious.”

Mashable: Omicron messing with your mental health? Don’t let the anxiety get to you.

Mashable: Omicron messing with your mental health? Don’t let the anxiety get to you.. “You’ve been here before. The flurry of headlines declare a ‘variant of concern.’ The talking heads urge you not to panic as chyrons below them repeat the words mutation and breakthrough. And, no, you shouldn’t emotionally unravel because this isn’t a repeat of March 2020 when there were no effective vaccines and little understanding of how COVID-19 spread. The fear of the unknown, however, still has the power to knock you down.”

Covid impact: NCRB data shows over 29% jump in suicides by businesspersons (India Today)

India Today: Covid impact: NCRB data shows over 29% jump in suicides by businesspersons. “The Covid-19 pandemic caused serious economic strain and the distress faced by business was greater than that faced by the farm sector in 2020, government data showed. The Centre on Tuesday informed Parliament that a total of 11,716 businesspersons died by suicide in 2020. This amounts to a jump of over 29% of the figure reported for the section in 2019 or the pre-Covid times.”

NBC News: Social media use linked to depression in adults

NBC News: Social media use linked to depression in adults. Now you tell me. “While social media has been widely linked to anxiety and depression in teenagers, new evidence suggests that platforms such as TikTok and Instagram can leave middle-aged adults feeling sad, too. The research, published Tuesday in the medical journal JAMA Network Open, is based on a series of surveys of 5,395 adults whose average age was 56.”

UCLA: UCLA-led Research Finds Americans Suffering Psychological Distress Over Pandemic-Related Job Loss

UCLA: UCLA-led Research Finds Americans Suffering Psychological Distress Over Pandemic-Related Job Loss. “With data from the national population-based Health, Ethnicity, and Pandemic (HEAP) Study, in-depth analyses indicated that, among U.S. adults who were working before the COVID-19 pandemic, negative employment changes, including pay cuts, temporary job loss, and permanent job loss, were associated with higher psychological distress. Stratified analyses by race further revealed the effects of negative employment changes on psychological distress were greatest among Asian Americans and Black Americans.”

University of Maryland Baltimore: Institute Launches National Online Resource to Help LGBTQ Youth, Families

University of Maryland Baltimore: Institute Launches National Online Resource to Help LGBTQ Youth, Families. “The Institute for Innovation & Implementation, together with the Family Acceptance Project has launched a new national online resource that provides access to accurate information and affirmative services to increase family and community support for LGBTQ children and youth, to help decrease mental health risks and to promote well-being.”

NPR: Why people with mental illness are at higher risk of COVID

NPR: Why people with mental illness are at higher risk of COVID. “Last year, researchers analyzed data from five hospitals in the Yale New Haven Health System to see how people with a mental health diagnosis who were hospitalized with COVID-19 fared compared to others. ‘What we found was we had a higher level of mortality for those that had a prior psychiatric history,’ says psychiatrist Dr. Luming Li, who was working on her Master’s degree at Yale University at the time.”

Medical Xpress: Researchers confirm link between testing positive for COVID-19 and fatigue and sleep problems

Medical Xpress: Researchers confirm link between testing positive for COVID-19 and fatigue and sleep problems. “Those who tested positive for COVID-19 (confirmed by a PCR test) had an increased risk of mental illness, fatigue and sleep problems, finds a new study that analyzed the electronic primary care health care records of 226,521 people from across the UK between February 2020 and December 2020.”

Route Fifty: Gun Violence Has Soared During the Pandemic, a New Study Finds—But the Reasons Why Are Complex

Route Fifty: Gun Violence Has Soared During the Pandemic, a New Study Finds—But the Reasons Why Are Complex. “In a new study, we found that the overall U.S. gun violence rate rose by 30% during the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic compared to the year before. In 28 states, the rates were substantially higher between March 1, 2020, and March 31, 2021, compared to the pre-pandemic period from Feb. 1, 2019, through Feb. 29, 2020. There were 51,063 incidents of gun violence events resulting in injury or death in the United States in the first 13 months of the pandemic compared to 38,919 incidents in the same time span pre-pandemic.”

Route Fifty: Mental Health Disorders Qualify You for a Covid-19 Booster. It’s Unclear How Many People Know That.

Route Fifty: Mental Health Disorders Qualify You for a Covid-19 Booster. It’s Unclear How Many People Know That.. “With an upcoming trip to plan for, psychologist Jacob Dean hopped online to check the eligibility requirements for Covid-19 booster shots in New York City, where he resides. ‘At the beginning of the pandemic I qualified because of body mass, but since then I’ve lost 75 pounds,’ he said. “I was wondering whether I qualified for a booster, and then I saw that anxiety and depression were listed among the underlying conditions. And I was shocked, because they definitely weren’t there before.””

The Atlantic: Why Health-Care Workers Are Quitting In Droves

The Atlantic: Why Health-Care Workers Are Quitting In Droves. “Since COVID-19 first pummeled the U.S., Americans have been told to flatten the curve lest hospitals be overwhelmed. But hospitals have been overwhelmed. The nation has avoided the most apocalyptic scenarios, such as ventilators running out by the thousands, but it’s still sleepwalked into repeated surges that have overrun the capacity of many hospitals, killed more than 762,000 people, and traumatized countless health-care workers. ‘It’s like it takes a piece of you every time you walk in,’ says Ashley Harlow, a Virginia-based nurse practitioner who left her ICU after watching her grandmother Nellie die there in December. She and others have gotten through the surges on adrenaline and camaraderie, only to realize, once the ICUs are empty, that so too are they.”

The Conversation: We studied suicide notes to learn about the language of despair – and we’re training AI chatbots to do the same

The Conversation: We studied suicide notes to learn about the language of despair – and we’re training AI chatbots to do the same. “We believe the safest approach to understanding the language patterns of people with suicidal thoughts is to study their messages. The choice and arrangement of their words, the sentiment and the rationale all offer insight into the author’s thoughts. For our recent work we examined more than 100 suicide notes from various texts and identified four relevant language patterns: negative sentiment, constrictive thinking, idioms and logical fallacies.”