Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System

Gizmodo: Job Ad for Bureau of Prisons Touts Amazing Number of Mental Illnesses in U.S. Prison System. “The U.S. Bureau of Prisons purchased a number of Facebook ads recently in an attempt to hire new people in a variety of roles throughout the country. But one ad in particular is catching attention on social media for how bleak it seems. The Bureau of Prisons seems to be using the number of mental illnesses in the U.S. prison system as a career opportunity for any psychologists who happen to be job hunting right now.”

NPR: Why people with mental illness are at higher risk of COVID

NPR: Why people with mental illness are at higher risk of COVID. “Last year, researchers analyzed data from five hospitals in the Yale New Haven Health System to see how people with a mental health diagnosis who were hospitalized with COVID-19 fared compared to others. ‘What we found was we had a higher level of mortality for those that had a prior psychiatric history,’ says psychiatrist Dr. Luming Li, who was working on her Master’s degree at Yale University at the time.”

Medical Xpress: Researchers confirm link between testing positive for COVID-19 and fatigue and sleep problems

Medical Xpress: Researchers confirm link between testing positive for COVID-19 and fatigue and sleep problems. “Those who tested positive for COVID-19 (confirmed by a PCR test) had an increased risk of mental illness, fatigue and sleep problems, finds a new study that analyzed the electronic primary care health care records of 226,521 people from across the UK between February 2020 and December 2020.”

University of Washington: Serious mental illness? There’s an app for that

University of Washington: Serious mental illness? There’s an app for that. “People with a serious mental illness often have dysfunctional beliefs that spiral them downward. They feel stigmatized. They may believe people are out to get them. They might think they will never get better. Wanting to address these dysfunctional beliefs, researchers created a smartphone app with daily game-like exercises to help people with a serious mental illness reassess their beliefs. The app was tested among 315 people in 45 states recruited through online ads on Google and Facebook in 2020.”

BBC: Psychiatrists fear ‘tsunami’ of mental illness after lockdown

BBC: Psychiatrists fear ‘tsunami’ of mental illness after lockdown. “Psychiatrists are warning of a “tsunami” of mental illness from problems stored up during lockdown. They are particularly concerned that children and older adults are not getting the support they need because of school closures, self-isolation and fear of hospitals. In a survey, psychiatrists reported rises in emergency cases and a drop in routine appointments. They emphasised that mental-health services were still open for business.”

Los Angeles Times: Their kids died on the psych ward. They were far from alone, a Times investigation found

Los Angeles Times: Their kids died on the psych ward. They were far from alone, a Times investigation found. “How many others die in California psychiatric facilities has been a difficult question to answer. No single agency keeps tabs on the number of deaths at psychiatric facilities in California, or elsewhere in the nation. In an effort to assess the scope of the problem, The Times submitted more than 100 public record requests to nearly 50 county and state agencies to obtain death certificates, coroner’s reports and hospital inspection records with information about these deaths.”

University of New Mexico Health Sciences: The Devil is in the Data

University of New Mexico Health Sciences, and I really really really hate this headline: The Devil is in the Data. “In a paper published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, the team reported their finding that instances of self-harm among people with major mental illness seeking medical care might actually be as much as 19 times higher than what is reported in the billing records.”

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets. “Despite appeals from the so-called therapy generation, a lot of mental health care remains prohibitively expensive and moderately stigmatized in the United States. Of the nearly 1 in 5 adults in this country who experience mental illness, just over 42 percent received mental health services in 2017. Mental health professionals are seeking to address this issue, in part by doling out advice online.”

The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis. “A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people’s language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis — the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University. The researchers also developed a new machine-learning method to more precisely quantify the semantic richness of people’s conversational language, a known indicator for psychosis.”

Instagram Update Adds Resources to Help Prevent Suicide

Instagram has launched a tool to help prevent suicide. “Instagram rolled out an update that introduces a new tool aimed to prevent suicide by providing a means for followers to reach out to users who appear to be troubled based on their posts. Aside from being a source of information and entertainment, the social media provided people with an avenue to express themselves to the world. It provided a means for them to share their happiness and success as well as messages or statuses — albeit vague and cryptic ones — that reveal what they truly feel.”

WaPo: ‘Angry and personal’: Social media is fueling attacks on celebrities, new study finds

WaPo: ‘Angry and personal’: Social media is fueling attacks on celebrities, new study finds. “Social media has altered the motives and targets of those who set out to kill public figures, spreading the threat beyond politicians to music stars, athletes and other pop-culture icons, according to a new study by a senior FBI official and a prominent forensic psychologist. The study, which was published online Wednesday in the journal Behavioral Sciences and the Law, aims to update a landmark Secret Service report that examined attacks on public figures between 1949 and 1995, ending with ‘Unabomber’ Ted Kaczysnki.”