BBC: Psychiatrists fear ‘tsunami’ of mental illness after lockdown

BBC: Psychiatrists fear ‘tsunami’ of mental illness after lockdown. “Psychiatrists are warning of a “tsunami” of mental illness from problems stored up during lockdown. They are particularly concerned that children and older adults are not getting the support they need because of school closures, self-isolation and fear of hospitals. In a survey, psychiatrists reported rises in emergency cases and a drop in routine appointments. They emphasised that mental-health services were still open for business.”

Los Angeles Times: Their kids died on the psych ward. They were far from alone, a Times investigation found

Los Angeles Times: Their kids died on the psych ward. They were far from alone, a Times investigation found. “How many others die in California psychiatric facilities has been a difficult question to answer. No single agency keeps tabs on the number of deaths at psychiatric facilities in California, or elsewhere in the nation. In an effort to assess the scope of the problem, The Times submitted more than 100 public record requests to nearly 50 county and state agencies to obtain death certificates, coroner’s reports and hospital inspection records with information about these deaths.”

University of New Mexico Health Sciences: The Devil is in the Data

University of New Mexico Health Sciences, and I really really really hate this headline: The Devil is in the Data. “In a paper published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, the team reported their finding that instances of self-harm among people with major mental illness seeking medical care might actually be as much as 19 times higher than what is reported in the billing records.”

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets

New York Times: Instagram Therapists Are the New Instagram Poets. “Despite appeals from the so-called therapy generation, a lot of mental health care remains prohibitively expensive and moderately stigmatized in the United States. Of the nearly 1 in 5 adults in this country who experience mental illness, just over 42 percent received mental health services in 2017. Mental health professionals are seeking to address this issue, in part by doling out advice online.”

The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds ‘sound’ words predict psychosis. “A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people’s language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis — the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University. The researchers also developed a new machine-learning method to more precisely quantify the semantic richness of people’s conversational language, a known indicator for psychosis.”

Instagram Update Adds Resources to Help Prevent Suicide

Instagram has launched a tool to help prevent suicide. “Instagram rolled out an update that introduces a new tool aimed to prevent suicide by providing a means for followers to reach out to users who appear to be troubled based on their posts. Aside from being a source of information and entertainment, the social media provided people with an avenue to express themselves to the world. It provided a means for them to share their happiness and success as well as messages or statuses — albeit vague and cryptic ones — that reveal what they truly feel.”

WaPo: ‘Angry and personal’: Social media is fueling attacks on celebrities, new study finds

WaPo: ‘Angry and personal’: Social media is fueling attacks on celebrities, new study finds. “Social media has altered the motives and targets of those who set out to kill public figures, spreading the threat beyond politicians to music stars, athletes and other pop-culture icons, according to a new study by a senior FBI official and a prominent forensic psychologist. The study, which was published online Wednesday in the journal Behavioral Sciences and the Law, aims to update a landmark Secret Service report that examined attacks on public figures between 1949 and 1995, ending with ‘Unabomber’ Ted Kaczysnki.”

Research: What Twitter behavior accompanies mental health crises?

Research: What Twitter behavior accompanies mental health crises? “A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association indicates that there were two specific types of heightened Twitter discussions in 2014 related to mental health: expected increases in response to planned behavioral health events and unexpected increases in response to unanticipated events.”

MIT Technology Review: How an Algorithm Learned to Identify Depressed Individuals by Studying Their Instagram Photos

From MIT Technology Review: How an Algorithm Learned to Identify Depressed Individuals by Studying Their Instagram Photos “…Andrew Reece at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Chris Danforth at the University of Vermont in Burlington, … have found significant correlations between the colors in photos posted to Instagram and an individual’s mental health. The link is so strong that the pair suggest that it could be used for early detection of mental illness.”

WaPo: When a cry for help rings out on Facebook, who answers — and how?

And FROM the Washington Post, a disturbing but important article: When a cry for help rings out on Facebook, who answers — and how? “If the Internet is a public forum, then social media is the megaphone installed at the center of it. Certainly it attracts oversharers, the ones who hash out breakups in Facebook statuses and live-tweet their days in embarrassing detail. We lurk in the cyber shadows and tsk and snicker — this is modern voyeurism at its most entertaining. But then there are people like my acquaintance who seem to be in a different, more dangerous kind of distress that seems private but is broadcast, intentionally or not, to a wide network of onlookers. It looks suspiciously like mental illness.”

Young People, Social Media Use, and Depression Risk

Young people using social media often might be at greater risk of depression. “The more time young adults use social media, the more likely they are to be depressed, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings could guide clinical and public health interventions to tackle depression, forecast to become the leading cause of disability in high-income countries by 2030. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is published online and scheduled for the April 1 issue of the journal Depression and Anxiety.”