Gizmodo: Google Hangouts Is Finally Ready to Die

Gizmodo: Google Hangouts Is Finally Ready to Die. “Google is just about ready to let Hangouts die its famously long death, and the company is asking users to not look back as they mosey on over to Google Chat. It’s the end of an era, of sorts, namely the wasted time the tech giant spent trying to make an all-in-one dedicated call and messaging app work within its vast suite of native apps.”

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best All-In-One Messaging Platforms to Simplify Your Messaging

MakeUseOf: The 6 Best All-In-One Messaging Platforms to Simplify Your Messaging. “With all the messaging apps available, it’s often hard to keep track of whose messaging you and where. All-in-one messaging platforms offer a solution to this modern-day problem. These platforms allow you to organize various messaging apps in one place, allowing you to say goodbye to the days of juggling multiple apps to communicate with friends, family, and coworkers.”

University of New South Wales: Unlocking the secret to private messaging apps

University of New South Wales: Unlocking the secret to private messaging apps. “Whether you’re sharing confidential information or swapping movie ideas with a friend, people are turning to private messaging apps that offer end-to-end encryption to protect the contents of their conversations. When data is shared over the internet, it often traverses a series of networks to reach its destination. Apps such as WhatsApp, owned by social media giant Meta (formerly Facebook), provide a level of privacy that even challenges Government agencies from accessing encrypted conversations.”

Intel 471: How cybercriminals are using messaging apps to launch malware schemes

Intel 471: How cybercriminals are using messaging apps to launch malware schemes. ” Apps like Discord and Telegram have underlying elements that allow users to create and share programs or other types of content that’s used inside the platform. These programs, colloquially known as ‘bots,’ or other content allows for users to share media, play games, moderate channels, or any other automated task a developer can devise. Cybercriminals have figured out how to leverage this for their own begotten gains.”

Poynter: MediaWise launches a free text message course to help voters prepare for the US midterms

Poynter: MediaWise launches a free text message course to help voters prepare for the US midterms. “With less than four months until the U.S. midterms, the social-first digital media literacy initiative MediaWise at the nonprofit Poynter Institute has launched Find Facts Fast, a free multimedia messaging service that teaches voters how to quickly discover reliable and trustworthy information online.”

Gizmodo: Fired Employee Claims Facebook Created Secret Tool to Read Users’ Deleted Messages

Gizmodo: Fired Employee Claims Facebook Created Secret Tool to Read Users’ Deleted Messages. “How ‘forgotten’ are your deleted internet posts anyway? That question has come under renewed scrutiny this week thanks to a new lawsuit filed by a fired Meta employee who claims the company set up a “protocol” to pull up certain users’ deleted posts and hand them over to law enforcement. If the former employee’s claims ring true, the practice could call into question Meta’s previous communications about how it accesses certain user data.”

Popular Science: You might be missing DMs on social media. Here’s how to fix it.

Popular Science: You might be missing DMs on social media. Here’s how to fix it.. “Social media can be a bit of a messaging mess, with DMs sliding in from anybody and everybody to make your account feel like the world’s worst suggestion box. Tech companies know that, so they’ve armed a lot of their apps with the ability to automatically filter out communications that don’t seem to be from people you know. By moving these messages to a ‘hidden’ inbox, platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram aim to prevent you from getting overwhelmed with random messages.”

Popular Science: How to send a voice message in any chat app, even if you think you can’t

Popular Science: How to send a voice message in any chat app, even if you think you can’t . “There’s something uniquely appealing about sending voice messages through chat apps. Not only are they more intimate and personal than typed text, they’re also more permanent than an audio or video call—the recipient can listen to them again and again…. With that in mind, perhaps you should be sending more of these personalized, informal audio snippets that can say just about anything (whether you’re arranging a party or despairing about a sports game, a voice message works). Many messaging apps now support voice recordings as standard, and there are workarounds for the rest.”

New York Times: Americans Can’t Quit SMS

New York Times: Americans Can’t Quit SMS. “The continued prevalence of SMS in the U.S. is a reminder that the most resilient technologies aren’t necessarily the best ones. It’s also another way that America’s smartphone habits are unlike the rest of the world’s in ways that can be helpful but can also hold us back. I know that many Americans use whatever text app is on their phone and don’t think too hard about it. Fine! But let me explain why we should reflect a bit on this communications technology.”

Consumer Reports: Can People Tell When You’ve Blocked Them on Texting or Social Media Messaging Apps?

Consumer Reports: Can People Tell When You’ve Blocked Them on Texting or Social Media Messaging Apps?. “I spent a week blocking and unblocking my Consumer Reports colleagues, and asking them to block me, to better understand how the feature works on seven different platforms. I think they unblocked me after the testing, but for some apps I can’t be sure. Down below, we’ll look at each one.”

KnowTechie: Green message bubbles on Apple devices are turning teens away from Android

KnowTechie: Green message bubbles on Apple devices are turning teens away from Android. “Earlier this week, The Wall Street Journal released an article looking offering some insight into why young people want to stay away from the dreaded green text bubble on iMessage. Apparently, today’s peer pressure leads young people to prefer Apple devices so they can have that sweet, blue text bubble.”