WWLP: Artificial intelligence changing accuracy of hurricane forecasts

WWLP: Artificial intelligence changing accuracy of hurricane forecasts. “Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have recently developed a new model that aids in predicting hurricane intensity. It’s one of several models that are used to track hurricane movement and intensity. Although this model will be using the same data that other models use, it differs in its use of ‘neural networks’.”

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality: New air quality tool officially launches in partnership with State Climate Office

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality: New air quality tool officially launches in partnership with State Climate Office. “The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Air Quality (DAQ) has partnered with the North Carolina State Climate Office to develop a new air quality tool, the Ambient Information Reporter (AIR). The new tool contains statewide weather and air quality observations about past, current, and forecasted air quality events.”

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Create Global Storm Surge Database. “The researchers also visualized the data by creating an online map that displays 802 tide gauges from around the world and all relevant data corresponding to each tide gauge covering the entire 1900s and most of the 1800s. Users can click on the tide gauge and download multiple daily maximum surge datasets.”

New Jersey 101.5: Has a tornado ever hit your town? New tool maps 70+ years of NJ twisters

New Jersey 101.5: Has a tornado ever hit your town? New tool maps 70+ years of NJ twisters. “…between 1950 and July 2021, there have been at least 182 confirmed tornado touchdowns in the state. That equates to an average of 2.45 per year….In a stroke of perfect timing, the NJ State Climate Office at Rutgers University just released a new interactive web tool that maps and charts all 182 of those NJ tornadoes.”

EOS: Have You Seen Ball Lightning? Scientists Want to Know About It

EOS: Have You Seen Ball Lightning? Scientists Want to Know About It. “Ball lightning has been reported for centuries but hasn’t been reliably observed by scientific instruments. A new website hosted by New Mexico Tech physicist Richard Sonnenfeld and Texas State University engineer Karl Stephan is collecting eyewitness accounts to improve the basic understanding of the phenomenon. They’ll compare the accounts with weather radar systems to characterize the factors that could lead to ball lightning.”

NHK World Japan: Tokyo Games heat index goes online

NHK World Japan: Tokyo Games heat index goes online. “Japan’s Environment Ministry has opened a website showing the heat index at various sports venues during the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics. The website that became accessible on Thursday shows hourly readings of the Heat Stress Index at venues from Hokkaido through Shizuoka Prefecture in central Japan. It also offers predictions.”

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Building a Global Storm Database

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Building a Global Storm Database. “A new global database built by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) captures characteristics and rainfall data of strong thunderstorms from the past 20 years. Including storms in both midlatitude and tropical zones is key to capturing how contrasting storm behavior and corresponding precipitation could affect populated regions of the globe.”

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data

Wired: Citizen Scientists Digitized Centuries of Handwritten Rain Data. “IN MARCH 2020, as the United Kingdom went into pandemic lockdown, climate scientist Ed Hawkins put out a call to people with time on their hands: He needed help turning nearly 350 years’ worth of archival rainfall reports into digital documents that modern researchers could easily use. To his surprise, 16,000 people volunteered…. Now, just over a year later, his group has released their work, a massive data set of upwards of 5 million observations extracted from the UK Meteorological Office’s paper records—the oldest dating to 1677.”

Local News 8: Wyoming launches new drought resources website

Local News 8: Wyoming launches new drought resources website. “The site provides resources and information for specific sectors impacted by drought, including agriculture, tourism, recreation, municipalities and water utilities. It also offers information on federal and state resources and assistance available to those impacted by drought. Information on wildfire conditions and restrictions plus links to United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) drought disaster designations for Wyoming are also available on the website.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Climate center develops tool to accompany release of new Climate Normals

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Climate center develops tool to accompany release of new Climate Normals. “On May 4, the 1991-2020 U.S. Climate Normals are being released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In conjunction, the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s High Plains Regional Climate Center is publishing a new tool that allows users to examine what normal looks like relative to longer or shorter timeframes than the most recent 30 years.”

King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present

King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present. “Weather professionals and outdoor recreationists now have a new tool they can use to compare current and historical snow depths at nine different sites in the Pacific Northwest. The new interactive website lets users compare measurements from nine monitoring sites in Washington and two in Oregon. It allows the user to compare the differences in mountain snow depth from one season to the next and create a graphic of their results.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website. “Last week, the National Weather Service launched its first new website for radar imagery since the early 2000s, touting it as a ‘major upgrade.’ The public did not see it that way. ‘Horrible,’ ‘really low quality work,’ ‘very very buggy,’ ‘unusable,’ ‘absolutely terrible,’ ‘not ready for public release,’ ‘garbage’ and ‘the worst’ represent a sample of complaints from users on social media since the radar.weather.gov site went live.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data. “For the past decade, the National Weather Service has been plagued by failures in disseminating critical forecast and warning information that is aimed at protecting lives and saving property. In some cases, its websites have gone down during severe weather events, unable to handle the demand.”