King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present

King5: Digital tool shows Pacific Northwest snow depth, past and present. “Weather professionals and outdoor recreationists now have a new tool they can use to compare current and historical snow depths at nine different sites in the Pacific Northwest. The new interactive website lets users compare measurements from nine monitoring sites in Washington and two in Oregon. It allows the user to compare the differences in mountain snow depth from one season to the next and create a graphic of their results.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website

Washington Post: Weather Service faces backlash after launching ‘slow,’ ‘unusable’ radar website. “Last week, the National Weather Service launched its first new website for radar imagery since the early 2000s, touting it as a ‘major upgrade.’ The public did not see it that way. ‘Horrible,’ ‘really low quality work,’ ‘very very buggy,’ ‘unusable,’ ‘absolutely terrible,’ ‘not ready for public release,’ ‘garbage’ and ‘the worst’ represent a sample of complaints from users on social media since the radar.weather.gov site went live.”

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data

Washington Post: Weather Service faces Internet bandwidth shortage, proposes limiting key data. “For the past decade, the National Weather Service has been plagued by failures in disseminating critical forecast and warning information that is aimed at protecting lives and saving property. In some cases, its websites have gone down during severe weather events, unable to handle the demand.”

High Country News: COVID-19 makes it harder to know when to harvest sugar beets

High Country News: COVID-19 makes it harder to know when to harvest sugar beets. “To create forecasts, meteorologists look to weather models fueled in part by temperature, pressure and humidity readings collected by commercial flights. But as the coronavirus pandemic swept the globe in early 2020, travel ground to a halt: In March, air traffic was cut by 75% to 80%, leaving meteorologists with just a fraction of their usual data, and, by September, many airlines were still operating less than half their pre-pandemic flights. Fewer readings mean that experts have an incomplete picture of what’s happening in our skies, resulting in murkier forecasts for farmers.”

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records

Cosmos Magazine: Renewed interest in weathered records. “Each week Cosmos takes a look at projects and news about citizen science in Australia. This week, we report on a new initiative launched by Climate History Australia at the Australian National University (ANU). Scientists at ANU have an ambition to create Australia’s longest daily weather record, beginning in 1838, and they’d like help from citizen scientists.”

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool

NOAA Climate Program Office: Alaska RISA launches Alaska Statewide Temperature Index Tool. “Built in collaboration with the Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, the new tool uses a statewide temperature index developed by ACCAP Climate Specialist Rick Thoman, and NOAA Climatologist Brian Brettschneider. The index uses daily temperature data from 25 Automated Surface Observation System stations maintained by the National Weather Service. Daily indices can then be compared to a baseline of average temperature data from 1981 to 2010. The project team hopes that this tool can help clarify the complex topic of Alaska temperature.”

North Carolina State University: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events

North Carolina State University, go Wolfpack, and we miss you Kay Yow: Climate Thresholds Tool Offers Historical Stats About Extreme Events. “They’re the sort of climatological curiosities that may have crossed your mind this year without even realizing it. In the Sandhills: Wow, 90 degrees before March is done? Here comes the sun! In the Foothills: A freeze in mid-May? No way! And in eastern North Carolina last month: Four inches of rain in one day? Don’t float away! If recent weather has left you wondering about the rarity of such events, or if you’re planning ahead for what sort of conditions you might expect at a different time of year, our relaunched and refreshed Climate Thresholds tool can provide the answers.”

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years

WUWM: New Database Helps Scientists Track Climate Change Over Thousands Of Years. “The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled. Paul Roebber, a UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science, says NOAA’s data gives context to changes climate scientists are observing.”

Weather .com: Here’s Which Type of Billion-Dollar Weather Disaster Has Occurred Most Frequently in Each State Since 1980

Weather .com: Here’s Which Type of Billion-Dollar Weather Disaster Has Occurred Most Frequently in Each State Since 1980. “Billion-dollar weather and climate disasters, such as those from severe thunderstorms, wildfires and tropical cyclones, have affected every U.S. state since 1980, and a new tool developed by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) shows us how often each type of disaster has occurred in each state over the last 40 years.”

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space. “In a world-first, an interactive map depicting the height of smoke plumes from bushfires during the peak of Australia’s bushfire crisis has been released. It is hoped that the new tool will improve the Bureau of Meteorology’s ability to predict where potentially dangerous smoke haze will move, as well as provide crucial ‘big picture’ information to disaster management agencies.”

Ars Technica: How Google researchers used neural networks to make weather forecasts

Ars Technica: How Google researchers used neural networks to make weather forecasts. “The researchers say their results are a dramatic improvement over previous techniques in two key ways. One is speed. Google says that leading weather forecasting models today take one to three hours to run, making them useless if you want a weather forecast an hour in the future. By contrast, Google says its system can produce results in less than 10 minutes—including the time to collect data from sensors around the United States.”

SF Gate: Old journals shed light on climate change

SF Gate: Old journals shed light on climate change. “n the 1940s and 1950s, the hunting guide L.S. Quackenbush lived in a cabin in remote Oxbow, Maine. He rented cabins to hunters, cut, stacked and split wood and used his daily walks to keep detailed notes on the spring arrivals of songbirds and the first appearances of flowers and tree leaves. His journals meticulously documenting the changing seasons grew and grew, eventually totaling more than 5,000 pages. Now they are filling gaps on how trees and migratory birds are responding to a changing climate in northern Maine, where historical data is sparse.”

Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud (Google Cloud)

Google Cloud: Big data, big world: new NOAA datasets available on Google Cloud. “A vast trove of NOAA’s environmental data is now available on Google Cloud as part of the Google Cloud Public Datasets Program and NOAA’s Big Data Project, opening up possibilities for scientific and economic advances. We are thrilled to make this valuable data available for your exploration. Google Cloud will host 5 PB of this data across our products, including BigQuery, Cloud Storage, Google Earth Engine, and Kaggle. The stored data is available at no cost, though usual charges may still apply (processing, egress of user-owned data, for example).”