Los Angeles Times: A groundbreaking Chicano series, stored 50 years in a garage, reemerges

Los Angeles Times: A groundbreaking Chicano series, stored 50 years in a garage, reemerges. “The East L.A. walkouts of 1968, followed by the assassinations of Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr., both beloved by much of the Latino community, happened months apart. Then came the Chicano Moratorium of 1970 and the killing of Ruben Salazar, an esteemed reporter for the Los Angeles Times. Out of this period of social and political activism, and fed up with the stereotypical depictions of Latinos in media, Sal Castro, a key leader in the historic walkouts, and Julian Nava, the first Mexican American voted to the Los Angeles Board of Education, approached Los Angeles’ KNBC-TV with a pitch: to create a show that explored issues facing the Mexican American community and examined history and culture from the Chicano perspective.”

Ayala: Mexican American Civil Rights Institute deserves continued local government support (San Antonio Express-News)

San Antonio Express-News: Ayala: Mexican American Civil Rights Institute deserves continued local government support. “The Mexican American Civil Rights Institute has driven home one idea in its short history: San Antonio is to Mexican American civil rights history what Atlanta is to Black civil rights history. While the latter is roundly recognized, San Antonio’s role as an activism mecca has not.”

New York Times: Cheech Marin’s Chicano Art Museum Is to Open This Fall

New York Times: Cheech Marin’s Chicano Art Museum Is to Open This Fall. “In the mid-1980s, Marin, buoyed by a burgeoning film career, made the leap from merely admiring Rembrandts and Vermeers in museums to acquiring work. A third-generation Mexican-American, he focuses on Chicano artists, and has amassed one of the largest such collections in the world. Now, his more than 700 paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures will have a permanent home in the former Riverside, Calif., public library.”

The Observer (Notre Dame): Professor Jason Ruiz receives grant to create digital archive of Pilsen murals

The Observer (Notre Dame): Professor Jason Ruiz receives grant to create digital archive of Pilsen murals. “Hundreds of murals cover the walls of homes businesses, schools, public buildings and train stops in the Pilsen neighborhood in the lower west side of Chicago. The murals depict the culture of the large Mexican population that blossomed in Pilsen in the 1960s and continues to live there today. However, visitors to the National Museum of Mexican Art located in Pilsen may find that information on the murals is lacking.”