NBC DFW: UTSA Offering 200-Year-Old Mexican Recipes in Free-to-Download Digitized Cookbooks

NBC DFW: UTSA Offering 200-Year-Old Mexican Recipes in Free-to-Download Digitized Cookbooks. “Archivists at the UTSA Libraries Special Collections are compiling recipes from a digitized collection of 2,000 Mexican cookbooks into a series of three cookbooks called ‘Recetas: Cooking in the Time of Coronavirus.’ As individuals find themselves in the kitchen during the COVID-19 pandemic under stay-at-home orders, the university said it hopes to share the cookbook collection and make it accessible to those looking to explore Mexican cuisine.”

University of Miami: Take a virtual, photographic journey through Mexico City

University of Miami: Take a virtual, photographic journey through Mexico City. “For as long as he can remember, Sean Black had always wanted to visit Mexico City. And this past Christmas, he finally made his dream come true. ‘Traveling on Christmas Day from Miami, a simple three-hour flight, I immediately set off on my adventure hailing an airport cab and taking a scenic, half-hour drive into one of the many breathtaking neighborhoods of one of North America’s oldest cities,’ said Black, a photography lecturer at the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Art and Art History. His experience touring the vibrant and colorful cosmopolitan city has become the latest online photo exhibition— ‘Mexico City: An Enchanting Trip Through Time’ —at the University’s Wynwood Gallery. “

Las Vegas Sun: White House eyes travel from Mexico as source of virus spike

Las Vegas Sun: White House eyes travel from Mexico as source of virus spike. “The White House is floating a theory that travel from Mexico may be contributing to a new wave of coronavirus infections, rather than states’ efforts to reopen their economies. The notion was discussed at some length during a meeting of the administration’s coronavirus task force in the White House Situation Room Thursday that focused, in part, on identifying commonalities between new outbreaks, according to two administration officials familiar with the discussions.”

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking. “When a top World Health Organization official this week declared Latin America the new epicenter for Covid-19, few experts in the region needed to be persuaded. The data are overwhelming — and overwhelmingly dreadful. The number of regional cases stands at 1.17 million. Demographic giants Brazil and Mexico are posting among the fastest growth rates and logging daily death records. Viral illness is also rising in Peru, Colombia, Chile and Bolivia.”

The Guardian: Record death tolls in Mexico and Brazil add to fears of Covid-19 surge in Latin America

The Guardian: Record death tolls in Mexico and Brazil add to fears of Covid-19 surge in Latin America. “In Brazil – where the president, Jair Bolsonaro, has dismissed the virus as ‘a little flu’ – the health ministry reported a new grim record of 881 deaths in 24 hours on Tuesday night. It has now confirmed 12,461 deaths, the sixth-highest death toll in the world, and 178,214 cases. Mexico also reached a new landmark on Tuesday night, reporting 353 new deaths over the previous 24 hours and 1,997 new confirmed cases.”

Hidden Toll: Mexico Ignores Wave of Coronavirus Deaths in Capital (New York Times)

New York Times: Hidden Toll: Mexico Ignores Wave of Coronavirus Deaths in Capital. “The Mexican government is not reporting hundreds, possibly thousands, of deaths from the coronavirus in Mexico City, dismissing anxious officials who have tallied more than three times as many fatalities in the capital than the government publicly acknowledges, according to officials and confidential data.”

National Catholic Reporter: Mexican American religious life will be preserved in UCLA archive collection

National Catholic Reporter: Mexican American religious life will be preserved in UCLA archive collection. “The collections highlight churches and faith-based organizations such as Church of the Epiphany, an Episcopal congregation where activists planned the Chicano Moratorium to protest the Vietnam War draft; Homeboy Industries, a gang-intervention and rehabilitation organization founded by Jesuit priest Gregory Boyle; and Católicos por La Raza, a Catholic lay group that criticized the church’s neglect of the poor and the lack of Mexican American representation within the institution.”

Exclusive: Nurses at Mexico Hospital Hit by Coronavirus Say They Were Told to Avoid Masks (New York Times)

New York Times: Exclusive: Nurses at Mexico Hospital Hit by Coronavirus Say They Were Told to Avoid Masks. “Nurses at a public hospital hit by Mexico’s worst coronavirus outbreak were told by their managers not to wear protective masks at the start of the epidemic to avoid sowing panic among patients, nurses and other medical workers said. Two doctors and a hospital administrator have died and at least 51 staff members have been infected since the new coronavirus was detected at the IMSS General Hospital in Monclova in the northern state of Coahuila in late March, the state health department said.”

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources. “The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and its research institute, the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA), have launched an expanded, redesigned website and database for its Documents of Latin American and Latino Art Digital Archive Project. Begun 20 years ago, the project now offers full, free access to more than 8,200 letters, manifestos, newspaper and journal articles, exhibition reviews and other key theoretical, critical and art-historical texts. The materials include significant writings by artists, critics and curators from Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean and the U.S. Latino communities — many now available for the first time, via a more user friendly platform.”

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online

The Takeout: Largest archive of Mexican cookbook manuscripts available for consumption online. “If you love Mexican food and are curious about how it came to be, click right on over to the University of Texas-San Antonio library, which has digitized much of its extensive Mexican cookbook collection, including 48 handwritten manuscripts.”

Read, Hot and Digitized: South by—The Border Studies Archive at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (TexLibris)

New-to-me from TexLibris (what a GREAT name): Read, Hot and Digitized: South by—The Border Studies Archive at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. “The Border Studies Archive (BSA) at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV) has fostered really interesting digital collections of borderlands materials in recent years. These projects include Traditional Mexican American Folklore; Border Wall and Border Security; Border Music; Latinas and Politics; Spanish Land Grants; and Visual Border Studies. Each of these collections offers insight into a vast array of cultural elements that combine to depict life along the U.S.­–Mexico border.”

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Defensores de la Democracia seeks to be a living archive of the work of journalists killed in Mexico

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Defensores de la Democracia seeks to be a living archive of the work of journalists killed in Mexico. “The story of Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, the Mexican journalist who arrived in the United States more than 10 years ago to request asylum but who could face deportation, was for Alejandra Ibarra the starting point of her project Defensores de la Democracia (Democracy Defenders), a digital archive that seeks to preserve the work of journalists killed in Mexico.” The site is in Spanish and Google doesn’t offer to translate it, and I didn’t have much luck with the other translation tools I tried.

Poynter: Want to search for hidden connections between companies? Meet Sinapsis

Poynter: Want to search for hidden connections between companies? Meet Sinapsis. “From Mexico to Argentina, it is quite common to see fact-checkers drowning in hundreds of spreadsheets and reports regarding the companies they are investigating, besides having a terrible time keeping track of all the information they find. Animal Politico, the largest fact-checking organization in Mexico, launched Sinapsis on Monday to try to simplify these procedures. The new tool is available in Spanish and is being translated into Portuguese.”

California Secretary of State: California State Archives Digitizes its Complete, “Diseños Collection” of Hand-Drawn Spanish and Mexican Land Grant Maps

California Secretary of State: California State Archives Digitizes its Complete, “Diseños Collection” of Hand-Drawn Spanish and Mexican Land Grant Maps. “This collection contains images of 493 hand-drawn sketch maps that were originally created from 1827-1846. The hand-drawn sketch maps, or diseños, were used by the Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governments to demonstrate land grant boundaries for individuals…. The diseños in the State Archives’ collection are complete and accurate copies of the original hand-drawn maps and were created in the 1860s as directed by the California Legislature. This is the first time that the State Archives’ collection has been digitized and available online in full color.”