Reuters: Scam loan apps extorting Mexicans thrive in Google Play Store

Reuters: Scam loan apps extorting Mexicans thrive in Google Play Store. “[Pedro] Figueroa is one of more than 2,230 people who fell prey to fraudulent loan apps in Mexico between June 2021 and January 2022, according to data compiled by the Citizen Council for Justice and Security, an advocacy group based in Mexico City. The Thomson Reuters Foundation found 29 loan apps with millions of downloads in the Google Play Store that have been reported to the authorities for extortion, fraud, violation of Mexican privacy law, and abusive financial practices.”

San Diego Union-Tribune: Administrators of popular Facebook page Tijuana 664 gunned down outside their home

San Diego Union-Tribune: Administrators of popular Facebook page Tijuana 664 gunned down outside their home . “Anonymous Facebook pages in Tijuana often purport to be offering news, but the content can run the gamut from memes to copy-and-pasted stories from mainstream news organizations to insider crime blogs that offer explicit details about violence in the border city. Many local journalists have publicly spoken out about how the existence of these anonymous pages puts their safety at risk by both encouraging violence and by creating confusion among the public about the role of journalists.”

First on CNN: Human smugglers peddle misinformation to US-bound migrants on Facebook, watchdog says (CNN)

CNN: First on CNN: Human smugglers peddle misinformation to US-bound migrants on Facebook, watchdog says. “Human smugglers frequently misrepresent immigration policies and conditions along the US-Mexico border in Facebook and WhatsApp social media posts targeting US-bound migrants, according to a report released Wednesday by a tech transparency group.”

Google Blog: Preserving languages and the stories behind them

Google Blog: Preserving languages and the stories behind them. “Thanks to a collaboration with our global partners, ranging from language communities to national language institutes, you can now discover the languages of Maya, Tepehua, Sanskrit, Vurës, Kumeyaay/Diegueño, Potawatomi and Serravallese, spoken across Mexico, South Asia, the South Pacific, the United States and Italy.”

Washington Post: Mexico City gave ivermectin to thousands of covid patients. Officials face an ethics backlash.

Washington Post: Mexico City gave ivermectin to thousands of covid patients. Officials face an ethics backlash.. “As the coronavirus coursed through Mexico City early last year, ravaging neighborhoods and overwhelming hospitals, local officials made an unusual decision. They gave out tens of thousands of medical kits to covid-19 patients containing ivermectin, an anti-parasitic medication. The drug has been championed by anti-vaccine activists around the world as a cure for covid-19 — despite warnings from international health authorities that there’s insufficient evidence of any such benefit.”

News@Northeastern: Free Speech On Social Media Doesn’t Mean The Same Thing Around The World

News@Northeastern: Free Speech On Social Media Doesn’t Mean The Same Thing Around The World. “A Northeastern survey of four diverse democracies found that people in other countries differ from Americans when it comes to opinions as to how social media companies should be regulated, with respondents in the United Kingdom, South Korea, and Mexico favoring stricter content moderation than people in the U.S.—especially in cases that cause harm or distress.”

Mexican American Art Since 1848: A New Open-source Digital Search Tool (The Latinx Project)

The Latinx Project: Mexican American Art Since 1848: A New Open-source Digital Search Tool. “Working with a team of software developers, scholars, curators, librarians and archivists, Constance Cortez (UTRGV) and I are addressing the invisibility and lack of access to Mexican American art through the creation of a post-custodial portal, Mexican American Art Since 1848. This online search tool provides visual access to Mexican American art and primary documentation through online unification of geographically disperse records held at different institutions.”

Washington Post: In coronavirus-hit Mexico, many women are ‘determined to not have babies’

Washington Post: In coronavirus-hit Mexico, many women are ‘determined to not have babies’. “Everyone knew the pandemic would bring death. Edith García Díaz thought it would also bring birth — lots of birth. As a state health official, she worried the crisis would impede access to contraceptives, leading to a rise in pregnancies…. But as the data trickle in, one state after another has reported the opposite tendency. Births in Mexico dropped 11 percent in the first six months of this year compared with the same period in 2020, according to preliminary Health Ministry data.”

Rest of World: One man’s quest to put Mexico City’s iconic street food vendors onto Google Maps

Rest of World: One man’s quest to put Mexico City’s iconic street food vendors onto Google Maps. “Food stands like [Teresa Dorantes] Hernández’s line the streets of towns and cities across Mexico. In 2018, the government estimated that over 1.6 million people worked in street food establishments, which represent almost 50% of total businesses in the country…. While a small minority are beginning to enter the age of technology — accepting digital payments and even hawking their fares on delivery platforms such as DiDi and Uber Eats — they overwhelmingly operate outside of Google Maps. As our tastes become increasingly dictated by algorithms and user-generated reviews, street carts like Hernández’s are at risk of being left behind.”

The Guardian: Holy bikini-clad Batwoman! Archive saves Mexico’s scorned popular films

The Guardian: Holy bikini-clad Batwoman! Archive saves Mexico’s scorned popular films. “Had they not been rescued from a dusty storehouse seven years ago, the original negatives of hundreds of Mexican movies featuring the likes of the silver-masked crime-fighting wrestler El Santo, a bikini-clad Batwoman and the Satan-worshipping Panther Women would have been lost forever. Salvation came in the form of Viviana García Besné, a film-maker, archivist, self-described ‘popular film activist’ and descendant of Mexico’s cinematic Calderón clan.”