The Verge: Mexico Struggles To Weed Out Fake News Ahead Of Its Biggest Election Ever

The Verge: Mexico Struggles To Weed Out Fake News Ahead Of Its Biggest Election Ever. “With Mexico’s election on the horizon, weeding out fake news in the country of 127 million has never been more pressing. Mexicans have long distrusted the press and for good reason. For decades, the national news media here consisted of two television networks and a handful of newspapers, all propped up financially by the controlling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Coverage of the government was favorable, and negative stories were buried.”

IRIN: A LinkedIn to combat rights abuse?

IRIN: A LinkedIn to combat rights abuse? . “In 2016, a 12-year-old boy was reportedly detained and tortured in Giwa barracks in northeastern Nigeria. He ended up nearly paralysed. ‘We wanted to cite the officers in charge,’ said lawyer Chino Edmund Obiagwu. ‘But we weren’t able to get the information on their names.’ Obiagwu is the director of the Legal Defence and Assistance Project, an organisation representing victims of abuse by the Nigerian security forces. He explained how a new website, Who Was in Command, has made his work a lot easier by publishing the names, ranks, and command responsibilities of security forces in Nigeria, Egypt, and Mexico.”

The Register: Mexican tax refund site left 400GB of sensitive customer info wide open

The Register: Mexican tax refund site left 400GB of sensitive customer info wide open. “Mexican VAT refund site MoneyBack exposed sensitive customer information online as a result of a misconfigured database. A CouchDB database featuring half a million customers’ passport details, credit card numbers, travel tickets and more was left publicly accessible, security firm Kromtech reports. More than 400GB of sensitive information could be either downloaded or viewed because of a lack of access controls before the system was recently secured.”

Quartz: Fake evidence of affairs and other creepy ways government spyware is targeting Mexican journalists

Quartz: Fake evidence of affairs and other creepy ways government spyware is targeting Mexican journalists. “‘You don’t have the balls to watch how I make out with your partner.’ That’s the kind of text message several journalists and human right activists in Mexico received as part of a campaign to hack into their phones. The messages could be traced back to government spyware, according to a new report by the Citizen Lab, a research center based at University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.”

U Texas at San Antonio: UTSA Libraries receives grant to digitize The Sons of the Republic of Texas Collection

University of Texas at San Antonio: UTSA Libraries receives grant to digitize The Sons of the Republic of Texas Collection. “The Sons of the Republic of Texas Kathryn Stoner O’Connor Mexican Manuscript Collection includes more than 5,400 items documenting social, political and religious life in central Mexico. Scholars will find information about individuals who influenced the country’s development, including Kings of Spain, two emperors of Mexico, Viceroys of Mexico, and Presidents of Mexico and the United States. Other items include financial records, personal and business correspondence, censuses and maps.”

The Wire – Twitter Diplomacy: How Trump Is Using Social Media to Spur a Crisis with Mexico

The Wire: Twitter Diplomacy: How Trump Is Using Social Media to Spur a Crisis with Mexico. “Trump’s push to force Mexico to pay for the wall has plunged the two neighbours into a tense and unusual diplomatic standoff. Mexico has long been a key partner and ally of the US and Enrique Peña Nieto’s government has keenly tried to avoid a standoff. Trump, on the other hand, has fueled one with his frantic social media activity. Welcome to the era of Twitter diplomacy.”

Bloomberg: Some Peso Traders Want Mexico to Buy Twitter and Shut It Down

Funny in a horrible kind of way, from Bloomberg: Some Peso Traders Want Mexico to Buy Twitter and Shut It Down. “There’s a strange idea circulating among Mexican currency traders. Well, more of a joke really. But there’s a certain logic to it. It goes like this: Instead of spending its precious reserves to defend the peso, Mexico should just buy Twitter Inc. — at a cost of about $12 billion — and immediately shut it down.”

The Guardian – ‘Chamber of Rats’: Mexican parliament renamed in Google Maps prank

Apparently pranking Google Maps is just a regular thing now. From The Guardian: ‘Chamber of Rats’: Mexican parliament renamed in Google Maps prank. “Pranksters changed the name of Mexico’s lower house of Congress to the ‘Chamber of Rats’ on Google Maps on Tuesday in the latest dig at the political class during a testing start to the year for the country’s government.”

Google Launches “Day of the Dead” Exhibit

Google has launched a “Day of the Dead” exhibition (AND quoted Octavio Paz, one of my favorite poets!) “Today, we want to invite everyone to experience Mexico’s tradition of paying tribute to life, through the Day of the Dead exhibition on Google Arts & Culture. The content is curated by 10 cultural organizations from Mexico, Peru and the United States and explores the Pre-Columbian roots of this festivity, its many transformations through history and its contemporary manifestations as told by pieces of archaeology, folk art, prints, paintings, sculptures, street art and many other artforms. The collection includes over 500 artworks and artifacts, 20 exhibits, 11 Street View virtual tours through cemeteries and museums and two guided tours that users can experience with a Cardboard viewer.”

Alamo Mission Gets A New Web Site

The Alamo Mission in San Antonio, Texas has a new Web site. “The General Land Office (GLO) set out to create a website that raised the bar on the typical state government website and push the boundaries of tourism web design. The resulting website features full-screen video, interactive features and other rich content to entice and excite prospective visitors of all ages.”

Database of Mexican Voter Records Leaked Online

First the Philippines, and now it looks like a database containing the records of over 93 million Mexican voters has been leaked. “MacKeeper researcher Chris Vickery, who is well known in security circles for unearthing database flaws by using the Shodan search engine, found the massive trove of records on 14 April and quickly contacted the authorities – including the US State Department, the Department of Homeland Security and the Mexican Embassy in Washington. According to the researcher, the database was finally taken offline on 22 April.”

New Digital Archive of Mexican-American Journalism

Smithsonian Magazine has an article on a new archive of Mexican-American journalism. “The new archive brings the headlines of the past into the present, spanning 149 years of significant Mexican and Mexican-American publications. The periodicals, which were published between the mid-19th century and the 2000s in Sonora, Mexico, Tucson, El Paso, Los Angeles and San Francisco serve as written testaments to the interests, cultural uniqueness and struggles of the Mexican and Mexican-American community.”

Mexico Sets Up Online Missing Persons Portal

Mexico has launched a new Web site with profiles of the country’s missing. It’s nowhere near finished – there are over 25,000 people missing as of last April, and only 467 people in the database. “To set up a missing person’s profile, relatives must first obtain a preliminary investigation number from the Attorney General. The profiles include a photo, personal information such as birthdate and identifying features and where and when they disappeared.”