National Geographic: Key ingredient in coronavirus tests comes from Yellowstone’s lakes

National Geographic: Key ingredient in coronavirus tests comes from Yellowstone’s lakes. “MICROBIOLOGIST THOMAS BROCK was tramping through Yellowstone in the 1960s when he stumbled upon a species of bacteria that would transform medical science. Brock was investigating the tiny life-forms that manage to eke out a living in the superheated waters of the park’s thermal pools. There, he and a student found golden mats of stringy growth in Yellowstone’s Mushroom Spring containing a microbe that produces unusual heat-resistant enzymes.”

EurekAlert: Microbiome search engine can increase efficiency in disease detection and diagnosis

EurekAlert: Microbiome search engine can increase efficiency in disease detection and diagnosis. “Big data makes big promises when it comes to providing insights into human behavior and health. The problem is how to harness the information it provides in an efficient manner. An international team of researchers has proposed a microbiome search-based method, via Microbiome Search Engine (MSE), to analyze the wealth of available health data to detect and diagnose human diseases.”

Chemistry World: Open access Atlas maps out microbial natural products

Chemistry World: Open access Atlas maps out microbial natural products. “A new open access database of microbial natural products has launched online. The Natural Products Atlas (NPAtlas) is free to use and contains more than 24,000 chemical structures. The tool is based on Fair data principles, making the information within it easier to search and use in secondary analysis.” I don’t put anything in RB unless I can get a basic understanding of what the resource is about. (I have skipped including items because I just didn’t get the underlying discipline or presentation.) In this case I had no idea what microbial natural products are, but I now understand better thanks to PubMed.

PR Newswire: Million Microbiome of Humans Project (MMHP) is launched, aiming to build the world’s largest human microbiome database (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Million Microbiome of Humans Project (MMHP) is launched, aiming to build the world’s largest human microbiome database (PRESS RELEASE). ” The ‘Million Microbiome of Humans Project’ (MMHP) was officially launched at the 14th International Conference on Genomics (ICG-14). Scientists from China, Sweden, Denmark, France, Latvia and other countries will cooperate in microbial metagenomic research, aiming to sequence and analyze one million microbial samples from intestines, mouth, skin, reproductive tract and other organs in the next three to five years to draw a microbiome map of the human body and build the world’s largest database of human microbiome.”

Phys .org: Powerful online tool will help researchers make new genomic discoveries

Phys .org: Powerful online tool will help researchers make new genomic discoveries. “By integrating data across thousands of microbial genomes, ‘AnnoTree’ provides a comprehensive framework for exploring the evolution of microbial genes and functions, and can be used to advance research across a wide range of industries including microbiology, biotechnology, industrial products, biofuels, and food science.”

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time. “Invisible to the naked eye, the health and movement of marine microbes that drift as part of the plankton is difficult to picture even for scientists – let alone everyday citizens. This challenge, to visualise the range of conditions that drifting marine microbes encounter, brought a group of expert scientists and visual designers together on a path to create the online citizen science project Adrift. Adrift is a portal that connects the public with the lives of microscopic marine microbes as they are propelled around the globe by ocean currents, with temperature and nutrient availability changing along the way.”

Phys .org: Researchers use 3-D printing to push knowledge of microbial communities

Phys .org: Researchers use 3-D printing to push knowledge of microbial communities. “As enthusiasm grows for 3-D printing, hailed by hobbyists and high-tech industry as a new frontier in the creation of custom products, researchers at Montana State University are using the technology for another purpose: studying bacteria.”