Engadget: Microsoft’s mobile Edge browser begins issuing fake news warnings

Engadget: Microsoft’s mobile Edge browser begins issuing fake news warnings . “Microsoft’s Edge mobile browser has started flagging fake news sites as part of its latest update for iOS and Android. Previously only available as a desktop plug-in, the feature is powered by news rating company NewsGuard — which makes a point of using journalists, not algorithms, to identify ‘unreliable’ websites. Its eponymous fake news extension is also available for Chrome, Firefox and Safari.”

The Verge: Google denies altering YouTube code to break Microsoft Edge

The Verge: Google denies altering YouTube code to break Microsoft Edge. “A former Microsoft intern has revealed details of a YouTube incident that has convinced some Edge browser engineers that Google added code to purposely break compatibility. In a post on Hacker News, Joshua Bakita, a former software engineering intern at Microsoft, lays out details and claims about an incident earlier this year. Microsoft has since announced the company is moving from the EdgeHTML rendering engine to the open source Chromium project for its Edge browser.” Google has formally denied this.

Ars Technica: Google isn’t the company that we should have handed the Web over to

Ars Technica: Google isn’t the company that we should have handed the Web over to. “With Microsoft’s decision to end development of its own Web rendering engine and switch to Chromium, control over the Web has functionally been ceded to Google. That’s a worrying turn of events, given the company’s past behavior.” I didn’t read all the comments because there are over 500, but the comments I did read indicated a lively conversation that’s worth looking at.

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser. “Almost two weeks ago, Microsoft announced that it will be rebuilding its in-house Edge browser from Chromium, all but ditching its EdgeHTML rendering engine. There are many reasons for the change, and the speculation goes even beyond that. Microsoft said that it will do a better job of standardizing the web; using the same open-source browser as Google’s Chrome makes things easier on developers. Former software engineering intern on the Edge team at Microsoft Joshua Bakita says otherwise though.” This is one person saying this as far as I can tell, and I haven’t seen stories anywhere else. If I hear more, I’ll post more.

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML. “By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google. This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The ‘browser engines’ — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are ‘inside baseball’ pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge. “Microsoft is building its own Chromium browser to replace the default on Windows 10. The software giant first introduced its Edge browser three years ago, with a redesign to replace Internet Explorer and modernize the default browsing experience to compete with Chrome and others. While the modern look and feel has paid off for Edge, the underlying browser engine (EdgeHTML) has struggled to keep up with Chromium. Microsoft is finally giving up and moving its default Windows 10 browser to Chromium.”

Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome (Make Tech Easier)

Make Tech Easier: Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome. “According to October 2018 figures, Google Chrome’s top position among browsers remains unchallenged. Another browser, Microsoft Edge, is winning rave reviews with its redesigned features and smoother navigation. But is Edge really the future of browsers as Microsoft would have us all believe? To find out, we pitted Edge against Chrome in a toe-to-toe contest to see which is the better browser.”