Microsoft: 14 January patch was the last for Windows 7. Also Microsoft: Actually… (The Register)

The Register: Microsoft: 14 January patch was the last for Windows 7. Also Microsoft: Actually…. “Microsoft has quietly admitted that it will be fixing the final Windows 7 patch that left some stretched wallpapers borked. It was to be the last hurrah for Windows 7: After the 14 January patch there would be no more freebies from Microsoft as extended support was turned off in favour of its paid-for Extended Security Update (ESU) program.”

Lifehacker: Block Internet Explorer’s Latest Vulnerability With This Workaround

Lifehacker: Block Internet Explorer’s Latest Vulnerability With This Workaround. “Microsoft disclosed a troublesome vulnerability in Internet Explorer last week, affecting various permutations of Internet Explorer 9, 10, and 11 across Windows 7, 8.1, and Windows 10 (as well as various editions of Windows Server). The bad news is that Microsoft won’t likely patch this problem until February—when the next major batch of security updates hits. Thankfully, there are a few workarounds you can use right now to keep yourself safe from this new remote code execution vulnerability.”

Microsoft Translator Blog: Dia daoibh! Tá Gaeilge againn!

Microsoft Translator Blog: Dia daoibh! Tá Gaeilge againn!. “Our ongoing mission to break down language barriers continues with Irish: Today, we have added Irish Gaelic to Microsoft Translator. Irish Gaelic, usually referred to as the Irish Language or just Irish, and commonly known in Irish itself as Gaeilge (pronounced “gwael-guh”), is the latest addition to the Microsoft Translator family of languages. This brings Irish to all scenarios powered by Microsoft Translator, including Custom Translator, which helps customers to build translation systems for domain-specific terminology and style.”

BetaNews: 0patch releases micropatch for Internet Explorer vulnerability — including for Windows 7

BetaNews: 0patch releases micropatch for Internet Explorer vulnerability — including for Windows 7. “At the end of last week, a serious vulnerability was discovered in Internet Explorer, affecting all versions of Windows. Not only is the bug (CVE-2020-0674) being actively exploited, but for Windows 7 users the vulnerability was exposed right after their operating system reached the end of its life. Even for users of newer versions of Windows, and despite the severity of the security flaw, Microsoft said it would not be releasing a patch until February. Stepping in to plug the gap comes 0patch with a free micropatch for all versions of Windows affected by the vulnerability.” Third party patches make me wary (this is not because of 0patch, but just in general) but if you don’t want to wait until February…

Engadget: Microsoft accidently exposed 250 million customer service records

Engadget: Microsoft accidently exposed 250 million customer service records. “While most people were out celebrating the start of a new year, Microsoft’s security teams were working overtime to close a potentially enormous security loophole. On Thursday, the company disclosed a database error that temporarily left approximately 250 million customer service and support records accessible to anyone with a web browser.”

It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too (Mashable)

Mashable: It’s not just Google: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM get hospital data, too. “The public freaked out in November 2019 at the Wall Street Journal’s revelations that Google was taking in non-anonymous healthcare information from hospital network Ascension. Now, a new report from the Journal shows that the tech giant is far from alone: Microsoft, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and IBM also have data-sharing agreements with hospitals. The scope of work spelled out in those agreements allows for some information to be shared that could identify patients, too.”

How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge

How-To Geek: How to Install and Use Extensions in the New Microsoft Edge. “The new Microsoft Edge browser, based on the Chromium project used by Google Chrome, brings a better browsing experience to Windows 10 PCs. One unique feature is the ability to use extensions from both Microsoft and Chrome Web Store. Here’s how to install and use them. You’ll need to download the new Microsoft Edge browser and install it before you begin.”