Mercury News: Facebook sued over alleged housing discrimination

Mercury News: Facebook sued over alleged housing discrimination. “The lawsuit, recently filed in federal court in San Francisco, marks the latest fallout from Facebook’s practice of allowing companies to post housing ads on the platform aimed at users based on demographic data. The suit claims Facebook allowed housing providers to shield their ads from people based on their national origin, family status, disability and other factors, thereby limiting those groups’ ability to find housing and violating the federal Fair Housing Act.”

CNET: Twitter may have shared your data with ad partners without consent

CNET: Twitter may have shared your data with ad partners without consent. “Twitter says it recently found issues with how it adheres to user privacy settings and that it may’ve inadvertently shared user data with third parties. The microblogging network said in a company blog post Tuesday that it may’ve shared certain data even though you didn’t give it permission to do so.”

Harvard Business School: Does Facebook’s Business Model Threaten Our Elections?

Harvard Business School: Does Facebook’s Business Model Threaten Our Elections . “Now 16 months away from the next election, efforts have been joined to prevent voter tampering from happening again. But I don’t think significant progress has been accomplished—a view bolstered in recent testimony before congress by Robert Mueller. What’s worse, users themselves seem unconcerned. Engagement on various applications on the Facebook platform is up. Users appear comfortable with the trade they make to give up privileged information in exchange for a range of convenient and free services. Without a push by Facebook’s customers or more fundamental federal government regulation, history is likely to repeat itself.”

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Will Now Show You How To Opt Out Of Targeted Ads

BuzzFeed News: Facebook Will Now Show You How To Opt Out Of Targeted Ads. “Facebook launched a transparency tool this week that will give people a little more information about how its targeted ads work (good!). Now you can see more details about why you’re seeing an ad in your feed, how it is linked to an ad agency or data broker, and how to opt out of interest-based ad campaigns run by businesses that have your information. The bad news is that looking at it may end up just making you feel worse about how your data is passed around by third-party data brokers — credit reporting bureaus and marketing agencies — like Halloween candy.”

TechCrunch: Targeted ads offer little extra value for online publishers, study suggests

TechCrunch: Targeted ads offer little extra value for online publishers, study suggests. “How much value do online publishers derive from behaviorally targeted advertising that uses privacy-hostile tracking technologies to determine which advert to show a website user? A new piece of research suggests publishers make just 4% more vs if they were to serve a non-targeted ad.”

Washington Post: It’s the middle of the night. Do you know who your iPhone is talking to?

Washington Post: It’s the middle of the night. Do you know who your iPhone is talking to?. “On a recent Monday night, a dozen marketing companies, research firms and other personal data guzzlers got reports from my iPhone. At 11:43 p.m., a company called Amplitude learned my phone number, email and exact location. At 3:58 a.m., another called Appboy got a digital fingerprint of my phone. At 6:25 a.m., a tracker called Demdex received a way to identify my phone and sent back a list of other trackers to pair up with. And all night long, there was some startling behavior by a household name: Yelp. It was receiving a message that included my IP address -— once every five minutes.”

The Intercept: Thanks To Facebook, Your Cellphone Company Is Watching You More Closely Than Ever

The Intercept: Thanks To Facebook, Your Cellphone Company Is Watching You More Closely Than Ever. “AMONG THE MEGA-CORPORATIONS that surveil you, your cellphone carrier has always been one of the keenest monitors, in constant contact with the one small device you keep on you at almost every moment. A confidential Facebook document reviewed by The Intercept shows that the social network courts carriers, along with phone makers — some 100 different companies in 50 countries — by offering the use of even more surveillance data, pulled straight from your smartphone by Facebook itself.”