Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies: 70 printed issues of Rowaq Arabi now available online

Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies: 70 printed issues of Rowaq Arabi now available online. “The Rowaq Arabi journal, as a platform for rights advocates and researchers, seeks to understand the political, social, economic, cultural, and historical contexts, as well as international and regional factors, that influence respect for human rights. The journal offers in-depth discussions and analyses of human rights policies and developments in the Middle East and North Africa, utilizing approaches drawn from the social sciences, humanities, and law. It is also a space for the discussion of new developments related to international and regional instruments for the protection of human rights.”

AraNet: New Deep Learning Toolkit for Arabic Social Media (Synced)

Synced: AraNet: New Deep Learning Toolkit for Arabic Social Media. “The performance of natural language processing (NLP) systems has dramatically improved on tasks such as reading comprehension and natural language inference, and with these advances have come many new application scenarios for the tech. Unsurprisingly, English is where most NLP R&D has been focused. Now, a team of researchers from the Natural Language Processing Lab at the University of British Columbia in Canada have proposed AraNet, a deep learning toolkit designed for Arabic social media processing.”

Arab News: Archive departments are too often neglected, says director of Saudi historical materials conservation center

Arab News: Archive departments are too often neglected, says director of Saudi historical materials conservation center. “Historical documents at risk of neglect are being restored with the help of the King Salman bin Abdul Aziz Center for Historical Materials Conservation, with many government and private entities seeking the center’s assistance. In an exclusive interview with Arab News, the director of the center, Abdulrahman Al-Baiz, described how archive departments at many governmental and private entities are neglected.”

Vice News: This Map Shows You Where Violence Could Break Out Because There’s Not Enough Water

Vice News: This Map Shows You Where Violence Could Break Out Because There’s Not Enough Water. “Here’s how it works: Using satellite image data, scientists can measure how much moisture is transpiring from crops, which gives them a sense for how healthy they are. If the crops aren’t doing well, the risk factor for conflict goes up. They combine that data with more traditional methods of predicting conflict, like political instability, to paint a fuller picture of how likely a fight is to break out.”

International Business Times: A YouTuber from Balochistan is petitioning against Google Translate

International Business Times: A YouTuber from Balochistan is petitioning against Google Translate. “Chiragh [Baloch] stated that the Balochi language is spoken by almost 10 million native speakers, making it 0.15% of the world’s population. Furthermore, he stated that the Balochi language is spoken in the regions of Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Southern Turkmenistan, Oman, India and Middle East countries.” Balochistan, which my spell checker insists is spelled Baluchistan, is a region in the Middle East and — it’s complicated. The Diplomat has a history / overview.

New York Times: Why Spy on Twitter? For Saudi Arabia, It’s the Town Square

New York Times: Why Spy on Twitter? For Saudi Arabia, It’s the Town Square. “Saudi Arabia provides no public spaces where citizens can gather to discuss news and politics. And the kingdom’s news media are state-owned or controlled, limiting the range of perspectives they carry. But many Saudi citizens have multiple cellphones and fast internet, which have led them to use Twitter to engage both with the world and with their fellow citizens. That has given the kingdom one of the world’s largest Twitterspheres.”

The Peninsula (Qatar): Gulf architecture conference and exhibition concludes at Qatar National Library

The Peninsula (Qatar): Gulf architecture conference and exhibition concludes at Qatar National Library. “These events announced the start of the Library’s recently-launched Gulf Architecture Project (GAP). GAP is a collaborative project between local and international partners to create an online digital collection of historical photographs, films and audio recordings, drawings, maps, and 3D models of the architectural heritage of Qatar and the Gulf region, with supporting research and publications, for the Qatar Digital Library … the largest digital archive on the Middle East, operated by the Library.”