North Carolina State University: Free Math Mapper Tool Helps Parents, Teachers Advance Mathematical Learning for Middle Grades Students at Home During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic

North Carolina State University: Free Math Mapper Tool Helps Parents, Teachers Advance Mathematical Learning for Middle Grades Students at Home During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic . “As schools in North Carolina have moved toward remote learning to slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), Jere Confrey, Ph.D., Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor of mathematics education at the NC State College of Education, and the Scaling Up Digital Design Studies (SUDDS) team are offering an online mathematics diagnostic tool for free to the public. The Math Mapper tool offers free diagnostic practice problems and assessments designed to evaluate middle school students’ mathematical progress on learning trajectories to determine what students know and what they still need to learn.”

ScienceBlog: Mindfulness Video Game Changes Areas Of The Brain Associated With Attention

ScienceBlog: Mindfulness Video Game Changes Areas Of The Brain Associated With Attention. “A research team at the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of California, Irvine, designed a video game to improve mindfulness in middle schoolers and found that when young people played the game, they showed changes in areas of their brains that underlie attention.” Which is great, but the game is not yet publicly available.

Library Journal: Middle Schoolers Help Transcribe, Digitize Rare Historical Newspapers

Library Journal: Middle Schoolers Help Transcribe, Digitize Rare Historical Newspapers. “Working with two Wilmington-based writers, John Jeremiah Sullivan and Joel Finsel, the students spent part of their spring semester transcribing what may be the only three surviving original issues of the Wilmington Daily Record, as well as working with four copies on microfilm. They then traveled to the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (DHC) at the University of North Carolina (UNC)–Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library to watch staff make high-resolution scans of the papers for archival preservation. All seven digitized copies of the paper, along with the students’ transcriptions, are now hosted by DHC’s Digital North Carolina archive, and will eventually be available through the Library of Congress’s ‘Chronicling America’ archives.”