Rest of World: Inside the risky world of “Migrant TikTok”

Rest of World: Inside the risky world of “Migrant TikTok”. “Speaking to Rest of World, experts pointed to migrant TikTok as a new entry point for young people into the world of irregular migration. The absence of reliable information means that social media has long played a role in helping people share advice, with Facebook groups and other private channels acting as informal hubs for knowledge: how to travel, whom to contact. But with the rise of apps like TikTok where posts are public, compounded by recommender algorithms that repeatedly suggest similar content, virality has given this information greater reach among people who aren’t actively searching for it.”

Trinidad & Tobago Guardian: Foundation launched to preserve legacies of Indian indentureship

Trinidad & Tobago Guardian: Foundation launched to preserve legacies of Indian indentureship. “The Girmitya Foundation, which is a non-governmental organisation registered in T&T, was officially launched last week Sunday at The Mahatma Gandhi Institute for Cultural Cooperation. Founder Nutan Ragoobir stated that Indian immigrants were made to sign a Girmit (agreement) as part of their bonding to hard labour and as such were called Girmityas. Ragoobir stated that the foundation was able to successfully achieve its first goal of creating and implementing a digital library dedicated to Indian history—Girmitya Archives.” If “Girmitya” sounds a little familiar, it’s because on May 15th I indexed an article about Girmityas arriving in Fiji.

Say ‘no’ to coyotes: DHS turns to social media to keep migrants from coming to U.S. (Border Report)

Border Report: Say ‘no’ to coyotes: DHS turns to social media to keep migrants from coming to U.S.. “The U.S. government is using social media to deter people in Honduras and Guatemala from giving in to smugglers who promise them easy access to the United States. This week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection began distributing digital ads in platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp.”

Deutsche Welle: Refugees in Germany tell their stories in ‘Archive of Refuge’

Deutsche Welle: Refugees in Germany tell their stories in ‘Archive of Refuge’. “In the video, 19 women and 23 men — four of whom belong to the LGBTQ community — tell about fleeing their native countries to Germany, some of them arriving when the country was still divided into West and East Germany. They are from 28 countries in Asia, Africa, South America, the Middle East or Eastern Europe. “

Forced To Flee: UNHCR podcast tells story of displacement over 70 years (UNHCR)

UNHCR: Forced To Flee: UNHCR podcast tells story of displacement over 70 years. “Over seven episodes narrated by broadcaster, author and UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Anita Rani, Forced To Flee revisits some of the world’s most tumultuous events over the past 70 years. Forcibly displaced people, humanitarian workers and others tell their own extraordinary stories and offer unique perspectives on some of the most significant moments in recent history: from the Hungarian Uprising of 1956 to the fall-out from the end of the conflict in Viet Nam; from the genocide in Rwanda to the crisis in Syria.”

NewsWise: Language barriers do not explain why immigrants have higher mortality from COVID-19

NewsWise: Language barriers do not explain why immigrants have higher mortality from COVID-19. “Language barriers or lack of institutional awareness do not explain why immigrants in Sweden have a higher mortality from COVID-19. These are the conclusions of a new population-based study from Stockholm University that analyzed intermarried couples–immigrants partnered with Swedes.”

Washington Post: An army of veterans and volunteers organizes online to evacuate Afghans, from thousands of miles away

Washington Post: An army of veterans and volunteers organizes online to evacuate Afghans, from thousands of miles away. “On a quiet, tree-lined street in the Bay Area, Jon Reed’s computer screen swam with maps of Kabul, chat threads and text messages from Special Operations forces, other service members and civilian contractors inside and around Hamid Karzai International Airport. A former Green Beret, Reed is one of thousands of veterans, active-duty service members, former government officials and civil servants working online to help Afghans flee Taliban retaliation.”

Upworthy: Meme artist raises more than $2 million in 5 hours to rescue Afghans on Taliban kill list

Upworthy: Meme artist raises more than $2 million in 5 hours to rescue Afghans on Taliban kill list. “We’ve all spent several days watching the news from Afghanistan with a mixture of horror, sadness, and frustration. Images of crowds of people clamoring to get onto planes at the Kabul airport, human beings clinging to a flying jet before falling to their deaths from the sky, hordes of men, women, and children desperate to escape a violent, extremist regime crammed like sardines into U.S. cargo planes—it’s all too much. We know there are so many people we can’t help. That’s the tragic reality. But there are people we can help. And that’s happening, right now, on the internet and on the ground in Afghanistan.”

Washington Post: Republicans raise money on Facebook by tying migrant influx to covid surge

Washington Post: Republicans raise money on Facebook by tying migrant influx to covid surge. “Facebook has allowed prominent Republican officials and candidates — including the chairman of the Senate Republican Conference — to use the platform’s powerful ad technologies to raise money by associating migrants with the surge of coronavirus infections in the southern United States. The ads, whose central claim has been rejected by doctors and fact-checkers, illustrate the platform’s inconsistent approach to defining coronavirus misinformation, especially when elected officials are involved. ”

Fair Planet: The Growing Role Of Smartphones And Social Media In Migration

Fair Planet: The Growing Role Of Smartphones And Social Media In Migration. “Researchers posit that mobile technologies are a driving factor for migrants and refugees, especially for those inspired by the experiences of others in their situation. While the number of global smartphone users is said to be over 3 billion, for the more than 68.5 million refugees escaping persecution, war and hunger at home, a phone is not just a means of communication but a mode of survival and hope.”

InfoMigrants: Developing projects to improve psycholocial health of migrants and refugees

InfoMigrants: Developing projects to improve psycholocial health of migrants and refugees. “The website is available in four languages (German, English, Dari and Arabic) and was supported by the German Ministry for Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung.) The researchers found that the need for professional psychological help among migrants and refugees was greater than that of the general population…. That is why the website bundles together lots of different projects conducting research on and offering help in this area across Germany.”

Phys .org: New digital media keeps families connected through forced migration

Phys .org: New digital media keeps families connected through forced migration. “Every morning in Vienna, 24-year-old Rasheed receives a WhatsApp message from his mother, who currently lives in Lebanon. Since he arrived in Austria in 2015 after fleeing from Syria, his mother has been choosing a picture with flowers, added a few words and sent it to Rasheed and to his siblings in their chat group. His brother lives in Dubai, the two sisters are at present in Turkey. One of them wants to get married soon, the other one had a baby three months ago. All four siblings respond, and this is how these five members of one family start their day. Even if the names and places in this example are made up, the scenario is real and typical of refugees in Austria.”