State of Delaware: The Delaware Public Archives is Pleased to Announce the Digital Release of The Abram H. Draper Collection

State of Delaware: The Delaware Public Archives is Pleased to Announce the Digital Release of The Abram H. Draper Collection. “The Delaware Public Archives is pleased to announce the digital release of ‘The Abram H. Draper Collection.’ This unique collection consists of 34 pieces of correspondence including letters and poetry from Sergeant Abram H. Draper to his wife Anna M. Wiley Draper during the American Civil War.”

NL Times: Digital archive of WWII forced laborers in the works

NL Times: Digital archive of WWII forced laborers in the works. “If you want to know where a family member or other acquaintance had to work during the Second World War, it will soon be a lot easier to get this information from the National Archives. The organization is working on making data on forced laborers available digitally. According to the National Archives, approximately 500,000 Dutch people had to work in Germany or countries occupied by Germany during the Second World War.”

Stanford University: Stanford scholars expand digital database with historic records from the Nuremberg Trial

Stanford University: Stanford scholars expand digital database with historic records from the Nuremberg Trial. “This additional collection, to be known as the Tad Taube Archive of the International Military Tribunal of Nuremberg, will allow the public to easily browse and discover the contents of over 5,000 trial records – including 250,000 pages of digitized paper documents – showing in meticulous detail the efforts of the IMT, a group of representatives from four Allied countries – the U.S., the U.K., the Soviet Union and France – who were tasked with prosecuting former officials of the Third Reich and holding them accountable for the horrific acts inflicted during World War II and the Holocaust.” The new collection launches tomorrow, October 1.

URI Libraries hosts new online exhibit, ‘The Unremembered: Indian Soldiers of World War II’ (University of Rhode Island)

University of Rhode Island: URI Libraries hosts new online exhibit, ‘The Unremembered: Indian Soldiers of World War II’. “A new online exhibit remembering the 2.5 million Indians who voluntarily took up arms to fight on behalf of their British colonial rulers during World War II is now live on URI Libraries’ new digital exhibit space. The Unremembered: Indian Soldiers of World War II, which acknowledges the contribution of these forgotten soldiers, features the work of multimedia artist Professor Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, and accompanies her mid-career retrospective ReVision at the Newport Art Museum which runs through January 9.”

National Archives: Civil War Maps from the Army Corps of Engineers Now Digitized

National Archives: Civil War Maps from the Army Corps of Engineers Now Digitized. “Civil War era and related maps from the Army Corps of Engineers have been digitized and are available to view and download from the National Archives Catalog. The records are part of the Civil Works Map File series from Record Group 77, Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers. The records make up the Z file unit.”

Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia

Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia. “[Ksenia] Coffman can’t recall exactly when her concern set in. Maybe it was when she read the article about the SS, the Nazi Party’s paramilitary, which included images that felt to her like glamour shots—action-man officers admiring maps, going on parade, all sorts of ‘very visually disturbing’ stuff. Or maybe it was when she clicked through some of the pages about German tank gunners, flying aces, and medal winners. There were hundreds of them, and the men’s impressive kill counts and youthful derring-do always seemed to exist outside the genocidal Nazi cause. What was going on here? Wikipedia was supposed to be all about consensus. Wasn’t there consensus on, you know, Hitler?”

The Daily Star: Library of Congress to archive local family’s WWII photos

The Daily Star: Library of Congress to archive local family’s WWII photos. “A collection of nearly a thousand wartime photographs from one local soldier are headed to the Library of Congress next month for permanent archival. Demart Carl Chamberlain, a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division who jumped thrice into combat during World War II, carried with him a handheld Kodak in his deployments across Italy, France and northern Africa.”

Fold3: New POW/MIA Records Added!

Fold3: New POW/MIA Records Added!. “The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) is an agency within the United States Department of Defense. Their mission is to recover the remains of military personnel who are listed as prisoners of war or missing in action from past conflicts. We’ve added a new collection of indexed records for the estimated 82,000 American military and civilian personnel still missing in action. The index covers multiple conflicts including WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and more recent conflicts including Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom.”

Korea Times: Hong Kong historians capture horrors of World War II in new website

Korea Times: Hong Kong historians capture horrors of World War II in new website . “Historian Kwong Chi-man wants Hongkongers to remember the horrors of war, and one particularly painful episode from the fall of Hong Kong in December 1941 stands out. Nurses running an orphanage in Fanling in the New Territories were raped and brutalized when Japanese soldiers arrived on December 8 and overran the place.”

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity.

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity. . “History is often told through the lens of conquerors. Generations of American schoolchildren learned more about the 15th century ‘discoveries’ of Christopher Columbus than his record of enslaving Indigenous people. Britain framed its 1897 takeover of a storied West African kingdom as a ‘punitive mission,’ glossing over the mass theft of priceless bronzes. After France seized what is now southern Benin in 1894, colonial officers disbanded the territory’s unique force of women warriors, opened new classrooms and made no mention in the curriculum of the Amazons. Even today, many in the country of 12 million know little about their foremother.”

USA Today: The people behind the numbers in Afghanistan

USA Today: The people behind the numbers in Afghanistan. “At least 2,443 American service members have died in operations Enduring Freedom and Freedom’s Sentinel. More than 3,800 U.S. contractors and Defense Department civilians have been killed. At least 47,000 Afghan citizens, and about 66,000 Afghan military and police members, died, as well as 1,144 allied troops. Even more staggering are the numbers of American warriors who returned home with injuries both seen and unseen. Over 30,000 active duty personnel and war veterans of post-9/11 conflicts are estimated to have died by suicide—four times the number that died in combat. As this war comes to an end, USA TODAY honors the men and women in uniform from every corner of our country who made the ultimate sacrifice for their nation.”

The News, Portsmouth: New website built in memory of the COPP commandos who trained at Hayling Island from 1942-45

The News, Portsmouth: New website built in memory of the COPP commandos who trained at Hayling Island from 1942-45. “SERVICEMEN who fought in Burma often claimed they felt they were the ‘Forgotten Army’ with all the attention on liberating Europe. But many special forces units like COPP – Combined Operations Pilotage Parties who trained on Hayling Island – were not even widely known about in the first place.”