Japan Times: Database of Japanese buried in Australia during WWII completed

Japan Times: Database of Japanese buried in Australia during WWII completed. “The Cowra Japanese War Cemetery Database project will be open to the public from early May, and includes the names, causes of death and in many cases intimate details, such as personal effects, of almost all of the 524 people buried at the cemetery in the small town of Cowra in the state of New South Wales.”

Korea JoongAng Daily: Sex slave documents detailed in a full catalogue

Korea JoongAng Daily: Sex slave documents detailed in a full catalogue. “The four-volume publication lists all the documents compiled by the [Northeast History Foundation] since it was launched in 2006 through the end of last year from Japan, the Allied Powers during World War II, China, Taiwan and Thailand. The catalogue can be used as a comprehensive reference of documents on the Imperial Japanese Army’s forceful recruitment of girls and young women into sexual slavery before and during World War II. It also includes records that have yet to be revealed to the Korean public gathered from the Second Historical Archives of China and the National Archives of Thailand.” The material will be put into an online database in April.

Forces Network: Voice Of WWII Veterans Recorded For Online Archive

Forces Network: Voice Of WWII Veterans Recorded For Online Archive. “The voices of Second World War veterans and their relatives are being recorded to mark the 75th anniversary of some of the conflict’s most momentous battles. Their stories will be captured for an online sound archive created by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC).”

UC Riverside News: Veterans history project receives VA funding through 2020

UC Riverside News: Veterans history project receives VA funding through 2020. “After a successful pilot year, the initiative, titled ‘Along the Chaparral: Memorializing the Enshrined,’ will continue for an additional two years, supported by a new contract worth $398,659 from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ National Cemetery Administration. “

Artsy: Lessons from the Afghan Women Who Weave Modern War into an Ancient Tradition

Artsy: Lessons from the Afghan Women Who Weave Modern War into an Ancient Tradition. “Despite decades of war, ancient pattern techniques that can take months or years to complete are still passed from mother to daughter. Testimony from the makers of these carpets is difficult to obtain, as many of these works remain unattributed, and the female weavers lack easy access to modes of international communication. But the largest online archive of Afghan war rugs, maintained by New York–based artist Kevin Sudeith, offers information and an online store. Still, the weavers’ authorship is often lost when these works go to market, yet their masterful compositions reveal a dark humor and complex commentary on contemporary life.” If you decide to visit the Web site, go to the “Index of Rugs” to browse the various styles.

Respect: Black Veterans Project Campaign Launch

Respect: Black Veterans Project Campaign Launch. “The Black Veterans Project (BVP), a veteran-led, multi-organizational startup, today announced the official launch of their IndieGoGo campaign to raise funds for a full-length documentary recounting the experiences of current and former Black servicemembers, from the Vietnam War to present-day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Co-founded by veterans Kyle Bibby and Richard Brookshire, BVP has a mission to preserve the legacy of the 2.5 million Black veterans living in the United States. Through the creation of a full-length documentary and digital archive of oral histories of Black veterans from all walks of life, BVP hopes to raise awareness of racial justice issues in the military and post-service.”

South China Morning Post: Japanese wartime photos strike a nerve in China

South China Morning Post: Japanese wartime photos strike a nerve in China. “The release online of 35,000 photographs taken during the Japanese occupation of China between 1936 and 1945 has riled Chinese social media commenters.” I can’t find a link to the photography collection or much other news about it. The collection purportedly came from Kyoto University; I can’t find any announcements on its Web site but I have contacted the site and will update if I get any information.