Maidenhead Advertiser: New website on White Waltham’s Air Transport Auxiliary launched

Maidenhead Advertiser: New website on White Waltham’s Air Transport Auxiliary launched. “Maidenhead Heritage Centre’s free online resource showcases more than 130 logbooks, hundreds of photos and other documents about the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA), which was based in White Waltham. It would ferry military aircraft between airfields and was notable for letting women pilot planes when they were barred from doing so in the RAF.”

Gazeta: Russia will create an online archive of Soviet prisoners of the Second World War

Gazeta, with the original Russian article translated by Google Translate: Russia will create an online archive of Soviet prisoners of the Second World War. “The Russian military archive will receive electronic copies of documents from about 500 thousand Soviet prisoners of war during the Second World War. It is reported by RIA Novosti . As noted, the state will make an online database of them.”

PML Daily: Excitement! Uganda receives Kings African Riffle digitized history

PML Daily: Excitement! Uganda receives Kings African Riffle digitized history. “The Uganda Government has received a piece of history of the King’s African Rifles (KAR) from the British Government at the Ministry of Defence and Veteran Affairs (MODVA) headquarters in Mbuya, Kampala. The Minister of Defence and Veteran Affairs Hon Adolf Mwesige received the digitalized KAR war records (war diary, medals and citations of KAR ex-service men) on behalf of the Ugandan Government.”

Women Love Tech: Anzac Correspondent Lets You Learn About History With The Use Of AR

Women Love Tech: Anzac Correspondent Lets You Learn About History With The Use Of AR. “With the use of augmented reality, Anzac Correspondent transforms your smartphone or tablet into a vintage 1918 camera that you scan the room with to snap pictures of people, animals, and events of interest from The First World War to relay back home. The app is in fact an expansion on the photos and stories that can be found in Queensland Museum’s Anzac Legacy Gallery, but in a way that is more engaging and dynamic; especially for the younger audience.”

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project

KNOM: Alaska Native Voices from WWII Are Focus of Historical Project. “IN AUGUST, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development recognized forty Native leaders around the country for their ’40 Under 40 Awards,’ including Dr. Holly Miowak Guise, an Inupiaq woman raised in Anchorage and Unalakleet. The center recognizes Indigenous leaders across the U.S. for making significant impacts in business or their community. KNOM’s Emily Hofstaedter spoke with Dr. Guise about how she’s working to bring the history of Alaska Natives in World War II to a wider audience.” This is an audio interview but it has a lot of excerpts.

Europeana Pro: The role of community-generated content in the digital legacy of the First World War

Europeana Pro: The role of community-generated content in the digital legacy of the First World War. “The revolution in digital technology and the accessibility to new material via digital storytelling are changing the way researchers are able to look at the period of the First World War. Projects like Europeana 1914-1918, which combines institutional and publicly contributed material, are disrupting the research life cycle and promoting new insights into historical research. Dr. Agiatis Benardou, Senior Researcher at Digital Curation Unit / ATHENA R.C. – a Europeana DSI-4 partner – fills us in.”

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy. “For African-Americans wondering whether their own genealogy research might uncover a runaway slave turned war hero or ancestors who prospered despite racial discrimination, there are burgeoning resources. Genealogists, family members and government archives can help black Americans reconstruct a family tree obscured by centuries of neglect and racial injustice. In addition, military records of African-American Civil War soldiers will soon be accessible in a searchable online database.”