NoCamels: Israel Adapts Military Radar Systems For Remote COVID-19 Patient Monitoring

NoCamels: Israel Adapts Military Radar Systems For Remote COVID-19 Patient Monitoring. “The Defense Ministry’s National Emergency Team at the Directorate of Defense Research and Development (DDR&D) said this week that the two systems, developed by Israeli defense company Elbit Systems and Elta (a subsidiary of Israel Aerospace Industries), were tested successfully under the medical supervision of doctors from the Beilinson – Rabin Medical Center. The systems use an array of radar and electro-optical sensors with which vital signs were measured and displayed on monitors for doctors in a sterile environment, allowing medical staff to avoid direct contact for risk of infection.”

FedScoop: Army looks to block data ‘poisoning’ in facial recognition, AI

FedScoop: Army looks to block data ‘poisoning’ in facial recognition, AI. “Adversaries are becoming more sophisticated at providing ‘poisoned,’ or subtly altered, data that will mistrain artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms. To try and safeguard facial recognition databases from these so-called backdoor attacks, the Army is funding research to build defensive software to mine through its databases.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Confederate naval ledger now freely available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Confederate naval ledger now freely available online. “The Confederate States Naval Iron Works operated from 1862-1865. The ledger also includes entries as late as 1866 as Warner worked with the United States Navy in turning over naval equipment to the United States government. Records surviving the Civil War that document the Confederate Navy is limited. This ledger provides information about Columbus, Georgia, ironclad construction, steam engines, and the daily operation and industrial reach of the Confederate States Naval Iron Works.”

The End Of Ownership, Military Edition: Even The US Military Can’t Fix Its Own Equipment Without Right To Repair Laws (Techdirt)

Techdirt: The End Of Ownership, Military Edition: Even The US Military Can’t Fix Its Own Equipment Without Right To Repair Laws. “This lack of a ‘right to repair’ is showing up in more and more places including, somewhat incredibly, the US military. The NY Times recently ran an op-ed from Capt. Elle Ekman, a logistics officer in the US Marine Corps., expressing her dismay at how the lack of right to repair laws is actually making it difficult to impossible for the US military to repair its own equipment.”

Bloomberg: This is not a Google product.Should it be?

Bloomberg: This is not a Google product.Should it be?. “There was a time when Google might have worn its unpopularity in Washington as a badge of honor. But the company is hitting middle age now, with $140 billion in annual revenue and a desire to expand into new lines of business. That’s made military contracts enticing to Google’s leadership, which sees defense work as an important stepping stone to more business in the $200 billion market for cloud services.”

EurekAlert: New US Army software rapidly converts live drone video into 2D and 3D maps

EurekAlert: New US Army software rapidly converts live drone video into 2D and 3D maps . “Dr. Richard ‘Ricky’ Massaro, from the Corps’ Geospatial Research Laboratory, designed a computational algorithm to convert full-motion videos from small drones into image files, extract the metadata, and produce accurate 2D and 3D geospatial images in real-time, according to the Army’s U.S. patent application published on Thursday.”

The Intercept: Google Continues Investments In Military And Police AI Technology Through Venture Capital Arm

The Intercept: Google Continues Investments In Military And Police AI Technology Through Venture Capital Arm. “Rather than directly engage in controversial contracts, Google is providing financial, technological, and engineering support to a range of startups through Gradient Ventures, a venture capital arm that Google launched in 2017 to nurture companies deploying AI in a range of fields. Google promises interested firms access to its own AI training data and sometimes places Google engineers within the companies as a resource. The firms it supports include companies that provide AI technology to military and law enforcement.”

Military.com: The Army Is Building a 3D Database of Real Cities for Virtual Reality Training

Military.com: The Army Is Building a 3D Database of Real Cities for Virtual Reality Training. “Army modernization officials are building a new database filled with satellite imagery and 3D models of cities and key terrain from around the world that may one day feed a new age of virtual training for soldiers.”

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past

Ars Technica: Declassified photos from U2 planes are helping archaeologists unlock the past. “During the 1950s and 1960s, US spy planes made regular flights across Europe, Central Asia, and the Middle East, photographing the terrain to track military targets. A chunk of the Middle Eastern photographs were declassified in 1997, and now those airborne images are helping archaeologists track changing features in the landscape that in many cases are no longer visible today, according to a new paper published in Advances in Archaeological Practice.”

Military Times: Is military aviation getting any safer? New mishap data shows mixed results.

Military Times: Is military aviation getting any safer? New mishap data shows mixed results.. “Total accidents involving the nation’s manned warplanes — fighters, tankers, helicopters and bombers — decreased 12 percent last year, dropping from 903 mishaps in fiscal year 2017 to 794 in fiscal year 2018, according to data updated through fiscal year 2018 and obtained by Freedom of Information Act requests to the Army Combat Readiness Center, the Air Force Safety Center and the Naval Safety Center…. Military Times has re-published that data in a searchable database which now contains the almost 8,700 manned and unmanned mishaps from fiscal year 2011 through fiscal year 2018. The database can be searched by year, type of aircraft, service and location.”

The Intercept: Pentagon Says All Of Google’s Work On Drones Is Exempt From The Freedom Of Information Act

The Intercept: Pentagon Says All Of Google’s Work On Drones Is Exempt From The Freedom Of Information Act. “All 5,000 pages of documents about Google’s work on the drone effort, known as Project Maven, are barred from public disclosure, because they constitute ‘critical infrastructure security information.'”

FedTech: Marines Embrace 3D Printing for Versatility and Speed

FedTech: Marines Embrace 3D Printing for Versatility and Speed. “The U.S. Marine Corps has a reputation as an agile fighting force. It’s getting even more responsive thanks to 3D printing technology. The service branch has recently embraced 3D printing for a variety of missions and use cases. Marines can now print parts and equipment on demand via a new unit and have even demonstrated printing a footbridge to show how the technology can be used in the field.”

Business Insider: Google Maps just accidentally exposed Taiwan’s secret missile sites

Business Insider: Google Maps just accidentally exposed Taiwan’s secret missile sites. “Google released new maps of Taiwan Wednesday, and in the process, exposed some of the island’s hidden missile sites, Taiwanese media reported Friday. Taiwan, a self-ruled democratic territory perceived in Beijing as a renegade province, faces an ever-present threat from the massive Chinese military force situated just across the strait.”

The Intercept: Google Hired Gig Economy Workers To Improve Artificial Intelligence In Controversial Drone-targeting Project

The Intercept: Google Hired Gig Economy Workers To Improve Artificial Intelligence In Controversial Drone-targeting Project. “MILLIONS OF GIG ECONOMY workers around the world now earn a living on so-called crowd worker websites — work that falls under the umbrella of crowdsourcing, or dividing up tasks into minuscule portions to spread over a large number of people. The sites pay as little as $1 an hour for individuals to perform short, repetitive tasks, such as identifying images seen in pictures and churning out product reviews. Some of these crowd workers were unknowingly helping to build out the Pentagon’s battlefield drone capability.”