US Army War College War Room: We Need An AI-Based Enemy Analysis Tool … Now!

US Army War College War Room: We Need An AI-Based Enemy Analysis Tool … Now!. “The U.S. Army does not have an automated enemy analysis tool at the tactical level. When maneuver battalion staffs plan operations, they manually analyze terrain and weather to predict enemy courses of action, considering how an enemy commander could most effectively fight. Staffs plan their own friendly course of action against this analysis. The process works much the same as it did 30 years ago. Staffs today have more intelligence products (imagery, UAS video, etc.), and computers help display enemy and friendly courses of action, but no enemy analysis tool analyzes terrain, weather, and enemy weapons and creates an optimal enemy course of action. Given recent breakthroughs in artificial intelligence—specifically the ability to win at abstract strategy games, this type of tool is now feasible. The Army needs it.”

Bloomberg Quint: U.S. Military Trusted More Than Google, Facebook to Develop AI

Bloomberg Quint: U.S. Military Trusted More Than Google, Facebook to Develop AI. “Facebook Inc. is among the technology companies leading the race to develop artificial intelligence. But Americans don’t trust it to do so responsibly, a survey from a U.K. think tank has found. More than two-thirds of those surveyed said they had either ‘no confidence’ or ‘not too much confidence’ in Facebook developing A.I., a report from the Center for the Governance of AI, part of the Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford, said. ”

Stars and Stripes: CDs, faxes make comeback as military file-sharing service taken offline

Stars and Stripes: CDs, faxes make comeback as military file-sharing service taken offline. “The shuttering of a widely used military file-sharing service last month has left the services without an online option for transferring sensitive unclassified files, so they’re turning to CDs, DVDs, postal mail and even fax machines.” Remember sneakernet?

Report: US weapons systems are highly vulnerable to cyber attacks (Engadget)

Engadget: Report: US weapons systems are highly vulnerable to cyber attacks. “The Department of Defense will have to ramp up its cybersecurity efforts now that it’s planning to spend $1.66 trillion to develop major weapons systems. According to a new report (PDF) by the Government Accountability Office, nearly all of Pentagon’s weapons systems are vulnerable to cyberattacks.” Sometimes I have to do ResearchBuzz with a side order of Tums.

BuzzFeed: Meet The People Who Spend Their Free Time Removing Fake Accounts From Facebook

BuzzFeed: Meet The People Who Spend Their Free Time Removing Fake Accounts From Facebook. “Kathy Kostrub-Waters and Bryan Denny estimate they’ve spent more than 5,000 hours over the past two years monitoring Facebook to track down and report scammers who steal photos from members of the US military, create fake accounts using their identities, and swindle unsuspecting people out of money. During that time they reported roughly 2,000 fake military accounts, submitted three quarterly reports summarizing their findings to Facebook, and even met with Federal Trade Commission, Pentagon, and Facebook employees to talk about their work.”

University of South Carolina: Parris Island Historical and Museum Society preserves historic film collection

University of South Carolina: Parris Island Historical and Museum Society preserves historic film collection. “On Tuesday, July 17, 2018, Sgt. Major James Moore (Ret.) of the Parris Island Historical and Museum Society (PIHMS) Board of Directors, presented Bill Bethea, on behalf of University of South Carolina Libraries Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC), a check for $200,000 on stage at the Beaufort Water Festival. The generous contribution will fund two positions for two years at MIRC solely dedicated to digitizing the U.S. Marine Corps Film Repository, a collection of films shot by U.S. Marines throughout the 20th century.”

CNET: Researchers found stolen military secrets for sale on the dark web

CNET: Researchers found stolen military secrets for sale on the dark web. “Military secrets are often heavily guarded, but it’s meaningless if there’s weak router security. Researchers from Recorded Future, a threat intelligence company, say they found a cache of sensitive military documents for sale on the Dark Web, including details on the US Air Force’s MQ-9 Reaper drones, as well as training courses on tanks, survival and improvised explosive devices.”