Bloomberg Quint: Google AI Used by Pentagon Drone Project in Rare Test

Bloomberg Quint: Google AI Used by Pentagon Drone Project in Rare Test. “Google’s artificial intelligence technology is being used by the U.S. Department of Defense to analyze drone footage, a rare and controversial move by a company that’s actively limited its work with the military in the past.”

New Zealand Herald: El Salvador’s military not opening archives for missing kids

New Zealand Herald: El Salvador’s military not opening archives for missing kids. “More than 25 years after the end of its civil war, families in El Salvador are still searching for an estimated 3,000 children who disappeared in the fighting. The country’s military has so far refused to open its archives from that period to allow an investigation into the whereabouts of children separated from their families during combat between guerrillas and government forces.”

ReliefWeb: Child Soldiers World Index reveals shocking scale of child recruitment around the world

ReliefWeb: Child Soldiers World Index reveals shocking scale of child recruitment around the world. “The Child Soldiers World Index, developed by human rights group Child Soldiers International, is the first comprehensive worldwide resource on child recruitment…. Covering all 197 UN Members States, the World Index, which includes more than 10,000 data points, will include authoritative data on national laws, policies and child recruitment practices worldwide.”

Motherboard: The Pentagon Has the Worst PowerPoint Slides You’ve Ever Seen

Motherboard: The Pentagon Has the Worst PowerPoint Slides You’ve Ever Seen. The Pentagon isn’t just America’s military brain—it’s also a vast bureaucracy filled with middle managers and that means it’s churning out lots of presentations. Bureaucratic presentations means PowerPoint, the universally loathed presentation software, and no one gives a [bleepy] PowerPoint quite like the US military. The Internet Archive—the site that catalogs the world’s digital detritus—has scooped up hundreds of publicly available military PowerPoints and preserved them for public consumption.” The original quote was not bleeped.

NextGov: Defense Department (Re)Launches Open Source Software Portal

Nextgov: Defense Department (Re)Launches Open Source Software Portal. “The Defense Department launched the Code.mil website on Tuesday, a new, streamlined portal for its similarly named Code.mil initiative, a collaborative approach to meeting the government’s open source policy. The new website was designed to give a more straightforward user experience. The site features a suite of new tools, including checklists that links to offer guidance, and represents ‘an evolution of the Code.mil project,’ according to Ari Chivukula, policy wrangler for the Defense Digital Service.”

The Independent: US military adds more than 4,000 names to gun background check database after Texas mass shooting

The Independent: US military adds more than 4,000 names to gun background check database after Texas mass shooting. “The US military has added more than 4,000 names to a federal background check database in the three months since a mass shooting revealed the organisation had consistently failed to report troubling convictions to the FBI.”

The Guardian: Fitness tracking app Strava gives away location of secret US army bases

The Guardian: Fitness tracking app Strava gives away location of secret US army bases. “Sensitive information about the location and staffing of military bases and spy outposts around the world has been revealed by a fitness tracking company. The details were released by Strava in a data visualisation map that shows all the activity tracked by users of its app, which allows people to record their exercise and share it with others.”