Recode: Inside Facebook’s plan to protect the U.S. midterm elections

Recode: Inside Facebook’s plan to protect the U.S. midterm elections. “On one hand, Facebook’s safeguards to prevent another election interference campaign appeared to work. On the other, it was a sign that Facebook will once again be a target — or perhaps a weapon — for people who want to divide American voters ahead of the 2018 midterms and destabilize support for government officials. Harvard lecturer Eric Rosenbach is bracing for the latter. “

Nieman Lab: Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you

Nieman Lab: Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you. “According to a new survey by the Knight Foundation and Gallup, American adults feel negatively about major Internet companies tailoring information to them individually, acting as content arbitrators that enhances bias, and not being transparent about their methods. (Note: Knight has provided support to Nieman Lab in the past.) Those major internet companies in this context are Google, Yahoo, Facebook, and Twitter (surprise).”

Poynter: How to be a better fact-checker in 8 videos

Poynter: How to be a better fact-checker in 8 videos. “Ask any fact-checker and they’ll tell you: Finding the truth is hard. It’s time-consuming, money is tight and the potential blowback can be severe. And with hundreds of digital tools and how-tos out there, it can be difficult to figure out which ones are actually helpful. So over the past year, the International Fact-Checking Network has been producing videos that focus on tips, tricks and tools that can help improve people’s fact-checking skills. Each video is about two minutes long and features interviews and demonstrations with journalists and developers who debunk fake news for a living.”

Washington Post: Several groups banned by Facebook had strong similarities to Twitter accounts linked to Russia six weeks ago

Washington Post: Several groups banned by Facebook had strong similarities to Twitter accounts linked to Russia six weeks ago. “At least three groups that Facebook banned this week for spreading disinformation shared similar names and traits with Twitter accounts that had been linked publicly to Russia six weeks earlier, underscoring the challenges of swiftly shutting down a foreign influence campaign even once strong hints emerge of who is behind it.”

New York Times: How Fake Influence Campaigns on Facebook Lured Real People

New York Times: How Fake Influence Campaigns on Facebook Lured Real People. “In late June, after word emerged that the white supremacists who organized last year’s deadly ‘Unite the Right’ march in Charlottesville, Va., had applied to hold an anniversary rally this month in Washington, a local political activist, Brendan Orsinger, saw that a Facebook event page had been created for a counterprotest. He recognized it as trouble. Little did he know just how much.”

Poynter: Snopes is feuding with one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers

Poynter: Snopes is feuding with one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers. “t looks like a Snopes fact check. It reads like a Snopes fact check. And on first glance, it looks like one of the outlandish fake news stories that ends up getting debunked. But the article — titled ‘FACT-CHECK: Did Kim Jong Un Really Invite Donald Trump To His Birthday party?’ — isn’t from Snopes at all. It’s satire. And it’s just one example of the ongoing feud between the fact-checking project and one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers.”

Quartz: Those hurt by Facebook write open letters to Mark Zuckerberg because nothing else works

Quartz: Those hurt by Facebook write open letters to Mark Zuckerberg because nothing else works. “Facebook says it’s ‘close’ to banning Alex Jones’s InfoWars, a website notorious for spreading for conspiracy theories, including that the deadly 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting in the US was a hoax. The decision comes as pressure from journalists intensified in recent weeks. But those who were most affected by InfoWars claims have been asking the company to act for years, to no avail.”