TechCrunch: 18 pessimistic opinions on the next 10 years of fake news (and 5 optimistic ones)

TechCrunch: 18 pessimistic opinions on the next 10 years of fake news (and 5 optimistic ones). “A topic like fake news, or more broadly the question of trust and verification on the internet, is a complex one — a land of contrasts. Sometimes you just have to poll the room and get a feel for what people are thinking before drawing any conclusions. That’s what Pew Internet did, contacting thousands of experts in tech, internet and social policy and asking how they thought things would go over the next decade. They were not optimistic!”

First Draft: First Draft launches its online verification training course

First Draft: First Draft launches its online verification training course. “In this course, we teach you the steps involved in verifying the eyewitness media, fabricated websites, visual memes and manipulated videos that emerge on social media. The course is designed so that anyone can take the course from start to finish online, or educators can take elements and integrate into existing classroom teaching. For newsroom training managers, we hope the you can encourage your staff to take the course online, or you can take individual videos and tutorials and use during brown-bag lunches. We provide relevant and topical examples — from events such as Hurricane Irma and the conflict in Syria — to show how these skills and techniques are put into practice.”

BuzzFeed: Twitter Was Warned Repeatedly About This Fake Account Run By A Russian Troll Farm And Refused To Take It Down

BuzzFeed: Twitter Was Warned Repeatedly About This Fake Account Run By A Russian Troll Farm And Refused To Take It Down. “Twitter took 11 months to close a Russian troll account that claimed to speak for the Tennessee Republican Party even after that state’s real GOP notified the social media company that the account was a fake.”

Google Serves Fake News Ads in an Unlikely Place: Fact-Checking Sites (New York Times)

New York Times: Google Serves Fake News Ads in an Unlikely Place: Fact-Checking Sites. “The headlines are eye-catching. Melania Trump is leaving the White House! Home renovation cable star Joanna Gaines has abandoned her HGTV show and husband Chip Gaines! Televangelist Joel Osteen is leaving his wife! None of the stories were true. Yet as recently as late last week, they were being promoted with prominent ads served by Google on PolitiFact and Snopes, fact-checking sites created precisely to dispel such falsehoods.”

The Conversation: Solving the political ad problem with transparency

The Conversation: Solving the political ad problem with transparency. “Almost all the content and advertising on the internet is customized to each viewer. The impact of this kind of content distribution on the 2016 election is still being explored. But, we can certainly say that the campaigns used this to say different things to different people without having to worry about accuracy. Addressing this problem by having people screen ads is impractical and legally questionable. A more straightforward solution based on current disclosure laws is being discussed in Congress: Increase transparency by having digital media platforms post all ads on a web page that everyone can view.”

Quartz: Why the Russia fake news scandal hasn’t touched Snapchat

Quartz: Why the Russia fake news scandal hasn’t touched Snapchat. “The absence of fake news and Russian interference on Snapchat is partly down to how the app operates—its 173 million daily users have an average of about 30 friends who they send snaps to regularly, rather than hundreds as they do on Facebook. You can’t include links, and you can’t look at a private account’s snaps. That makes it less of a connected network and more like a collection of closed groups, meaning it is much harder for anything to go viral. But Snap is also deliberately much stricter than other social media companies about which news outlets it partners with and promotes, and how it reviews political and advocacy ads that appear there.”

Business Insider: This winning team of university students have a plan to combat fake news – and it’s a 3-pronged attack

Business Insider: This winning team of university students have a plan to combat fake news – and it’s a 3-pronged attack. “The growing prominence of fake news since the US presidential election last year has made it the talk of the town – with major companies like Facebook actively trying to curb the spread of erroneous news circulating online. So when 140 students were tasked to come up with tech solutions to combat fake news at a hackathon over the weekend, one group in particular stood out in the eyes of the judges with its ‘“three-pronged’ approach.”