TechCrunch: TikTok launches an in-app US midterms Elections Center, shares plan to fight misinformation

TechCrunch: TikTok launches an in-app US midterms Elections Center, shares plan to fight misinformation. “The new feature will allow users to access state-by-state election information, including details on how to register to vote, how to vote by mail, how to find your polling place and more, provided by TikTok partner NASS (the National Association of Secretaries of State). TikTok also newly partnered with Ballotpedia to allow users to see who’s on their ballot, and is working with various voting assistance programs — including the Center for Democracy in Deaf America (for deaf voters), the Federal Voting Assistance Program (overseas voting), the Campus Vote Project (students) and Restore Your Vote (people with past convictions) — to provide content for specific groups.”

WIRED: Google Search Is Quietly Damaging Democracy

WIRED: Google Search Is Quietly Damaging Democracy. “Google’s latest desire to answer our questions for us, rather than requiring us to click on the returns and find the answers for ourselves, is not particularly problematic if what you’re seeking is a straightforward fact like how many ounces make up a gallon. The problem is, many rely on search engines to seek out information about more convoluted topics. And, as my research reveals, this shift can lead to incorrect returns that often disrupt democratic participation, confirm unsubstantiated claims, and are easily manipulatable by people looking to spread falsehoods.”

BuzzFeed News: Medical Experts Are Becoming Influencers Amid All The Anxiety Over Monkeypox

BuzzFeed News: Medical Experts Are Becoming Influencers Amid All The Anxiety Over Monkeypox. “COVID introduced us to the virus influencer: doctors and science writers on Twitter and Instagram who built huge social profiles — many of which translated into media appearances — by sharing news, information, and takes on an unknown virus during a history-defining pandemic. And now, with monkeypox having been declared a public health emergency, we’re seeing a similar shift, and many sensationalist medical experts have dominated the conversation as people search for answers.”

International Journalists’ Network: New tool helps media in Kenya combat spread of false information

International Journalists’ Network: New tool helps media in Kenya combat spread of false information. “To address the spread of disinformation during the 2022 election season and beyond, the Media Council of Kenya (MCK) in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme launched the iVerify Network of Fact-checking Desks, a digital platform that newsrooms and journalists can use to fact-check information before they publish or broadcast. New to Kenya, iVerify has in the past been used successfully elsewhere in Africa.”

Brookings Institution: EU Code of Practice on Disinformation

Brookings Institution: EU Code of Practice on Disinformation. “As platform signatories continue to grow their products and services, and disinformation continues to evolve, the larger question is whether cooperation between the private sector and the European Commission will make a meaningful difference against the spread of disinformation online. Ultimately, the EC will have to assess whether companies are significantly improving under self-regulatory codes, or if stricter legislative frameworks like the DSA are needed in the future.”

Newswise: UTSW researchers document “infodemic” of false information on COVID-19 in first year of pandemic

Newswise: UTSW researchers document “infodemic” of false information on COVID-19 in first year of pandemic. “The researchers used a Twitter scraping tool called Twint to collect English-language tweets including #scamdemic or #plandemic. After eliminating retweets, replies, and duplicate tweets, they found that 40,081 users tweeted 227,067 times using the selected hashtags. While Twitter suspended one-fifth of the users associated with the tweets, 80% of them were left to post and repeat misinformation (defined as false information not intended to harm) and disinformation (false information that carries an intent to harm).”

New York Times: A Stranger Filmed Her on the Train. TikTok Users Decided She Had Monkeypox.

New York Times: A Stranger Filmed Her on the Train. TikTok Users Decided She Had Monkeypox.. “Lilly Simon, a 33-year-old in Brooklyn, does not have monkeypox. She does have neurofibromatosis type 1, a genetic condition that causes tumors to grow at her nerve endings. Those tumors were filmed surreptitiously by a TikTok user while Ms. Simon was riding the subway on a Thursday in late July during her commute.”

PolitiFact: How will social media platforms respond to election misinformation? It isn’t clear

PolitiFact: How will social media platforms respond to election misinformation? It isn’t clear. “As we reviewed the rules for false claims about elections and voting on social media, we found that determining what gets removed, what gets labeled and what gets downgraded isn’t straightforward. Every platform is different, and their policies aren’t always clearly outlined. Even when policies are clear, platforms may still shift them quickly without making the changes obvious to users.”

Poynter: How Facebook pages exploit Russia’s war in Ukraine with false videos

Poynter: How Facebook pages exploit Russia’s war in Ukraine with false videos. “Twin Facebook pages advertise themselves as providing newsy and up-to-the-minute coverage of Russia’s war in Ukraine. But on a given day, their followers might see videos claiming Norwegians raided Russian ships, Vladimir Putin was defeated on ‘all fronts,’ or that a single British ship blocked a Russian fleet. None of those headlines are true. But that doesn’t stop the pages Fios Vinks and Fiosl Liesi from earning clicks, views and a monetizable following through false reporting on the war.”