Tubefilter: YouTube Removes Videos From Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro For Spreading COVID Misinformation

Tubefilter: YouTube Removes Videos From Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro For Spreading COVID Misinformation. “Reuters notes that Bolsonaro has been outspoken against lockdowns, vaccines, masks, and has promoted unscientific treatments on his YouTube channel, where he hosts weekly addresses. These streams — which are also distributed on Facebook — see the far-right figure taking questions from viewers and deriding his enemies alongside appearances from ministers and music.”

ZDNet: On Facebook, quoting ‘Dune’ gets you suspended while posting COVID and vaccine misinformation gets you recommended

ZDNet: On Facebook, quoting ‘Dune’ gets you suspended while posting COVID and vaccine misinformation gets you recommended. “Quoting movies doesn’t hurt or result in the death of anyone. But do you know what does? Spreading misinformation about vaccines and COVID-19. That absolutely will kill people. On July 20, the internet news watchdog NewsGuard presented a report to the World Health Organization. The report’s conclusion: Not only has Facebook failed to be proactive in the removal of misinformation about vaccines and COVID-19, but the social platform is actively enabling and accelerating its spread.”

EurekAlert: On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog — or a fake Russian Twitter account

EurekAlert: On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog — or a fake Russian Twitter account. “Many legacy media outlets played an unwitting role in the growth of the four most successful fake Twitter accounts hosted by the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) that were created to spread disinformation during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, according to a study led by a University at Buffalo communication researcher.”

University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute: Huntsman Cancer Institute Study Shows Cancer Misinformation Common On Social Media Sites

University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute: Huntsman Cancer Institute Study Shows Cancer Misinformation Common On Social Media Sites. “A new study published online today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reports that one third of the most popular cancer treatment articles on social media contain misinformation. Further, the vast majority of that misinformation has the potential to harm cancer patients by supporting approaches that could negatively impact the quality of their treatment and chances for survival. The study also showed that articles containing misinformation garner more attention and engagement than articles with evidence-based information.”

AP FACT CHECK: Biden goes too far in assurances on vaccines (AP)

AP: AP FACT CHECK: Biden goes too far in assurances on vaccines. “President Joe Biden offered an absolute guarantee Wednesday that people who get their COVID-19 vaccines are completely protected from infection, sickness and death from the coronavirus. The reality is not that cut and dried. The vaccines are extremely effective but ‘breakthrough’ infections do occur and the delta variant driving cases among the unvaccinated in the U.S. is not fully understood.”

‘Ridiculous’: Vaccine Myths Cripple U.S. Uptake as Delta Surges (BloombergQuint)

BloombergQuint: ‘Ridiculous’: Vaccine Myths Cripple U.S. Uptake as Delta Surges. “”Just as the Biden administration appeared at the verge of snuffing out Covid-19 in the U.S., a shadow pandemic of disinformation threatens to prolong the crisis. Promulgated virus-like itself through social media platforms, a miasma of uncertainties, anecdotes and outright lies has seized the imaginations of Americans hesitant to be vaccinated, slowing the U.S. campaign to inoculate its population.”

Mashable: Facebook’s response to Biden and his COVID misinfo criticism is a big miss

Mashable: Facebook’s response to Biden and his COVID misinfo criticism is a big miss. “Even if Facebook’s argument is that the company is doing everything correctly now, the fact is that the algorithm it created, which continues to award reactionary content — i.e. conspiracy theories, misinformation — that receives the most engagement, undermines positive efforts. Also, there’s plenty of damage done before corrective actions can be taken in the first place.”

New York Times: ‘They’re Killing People’? Biden Isn’t Quite Right, but He’s Not Wrong.

New York Times: ‘They’re Killing People’? Biden Isn’t Quite Right, but He’s Not Wrong.. “You could also blame individuals themselves for believing in lies and not doing due diligence and checking their facts. After all, deciding to forgo a vaccine is a personal choice, even if it is an unfortunate one. But the ability to resist social media juggernauts pales in comparison to the tremendous power of these platforms to amplify bad information. Attempting to stop falsehoods by claiming to offer good information is like using a single sandbag to hold back an impossibly fetid ocean.”

CBS News: Biden accuses social media platforms of “killing people” with spread of COVID misinformation

CBS News: Biden accuses social media platforms of “killing people” with spread of COVID misinformation. “President Biden leveled an extraordinary charge against Facebook and other social media platforms on Friday, claiming they are ‘killing people’ by allowing coronavirus misinformation to spread. The accusation comes as health officials are voicing concern over rising cases of the virus and stalling vaccination rates.”

From corporate America to conspiracy theory promotion: How a Minnesota man made a career out of anonymously amplifying dark plots (Washington Post)

Washington Post: From corporate America to conspiracy theory promotion: How a Minnesota man made a career out of anonymously amplifying dark plots. “Sean G. Turnbull displays many of the hallmarks of a successful upper-middle-class family man, a former film producer and marketing manager for one of the country’s largest retail corporations who lives in a well-appointed home in this Minneapolis-St. Paul suburb. Former colleagues describe him as smart, affable and family-oriented. But for more than a decade, the 53-year-old has also pursued a less conventional path: anonymously promoting conspiracy theories about dark forces in American politics on websites and social media accounts in a business he runs out of his home. His audience numbers are respectable and his ad base is resilient, according to corporate records and interviews.”

Poynter: She was an intelligence analyst at the CIA. Now she writes about the dangers of ‘fake news.’

Poynter: She was an intelligence analyst at the CIA. Now she writes about the dangers of ‘fake news.’. “As an intelligence analyst at the CIA, Cindy Otis was trained to assess how our country’s foreign adversaries deploy divisive rumors, destructive conspiracy theories and other kinds of disinformation against us. Several months after the 2016 presidential election — which saw both the concerted Russian campaign to undermine trust in democracy and a surge in domestically created false content — she decided to leave the agency and deploy her skills on a different front.”