Becker’s Hospital Review: Popular social media videos on bladder, prostate cancer source of misinformation, study finds

Becker’s Hospital Review: Popular social media videos on bladder, prostate cancer source of misinformation, study finds . “Top-viewed YouTube videos on bladder and prostate cancer often present inaccurate or low-quality information, according to two recent studies led by researchers at New York City-based NYU Langone Health. The first study, published in the journal of European Urology, evaluated the first 150 of 242,000 YouTube videos that come up when searching bladder cancer. Researchers used validated instruments to evaluate each video’s overall quality.”

Mashable: Facebook says it removed the internet’s 12 most prominent anti-vaxxers. 10 are still on the social network.

Mashable: Facebook says it removed the internet’s 12 most prominent anti-vaxxers. 10 are still on the social network.. “In response to the hearing, the CCDH and Anti-Vax Watch have just put out what they are calling the ‘sequel’ to the initial Disinformation Dozen report. It provides multiple examples of how these prominent anti-vaxxers, such as Joseph Mercola, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and Rizza Islam, have violated Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter’s own policies on COVID-19 and vaccination misinformation. The new report focuses on 105 pieces of content from the Disinformation Dozen posted over the past 30 days that clearly violate the social media companies’ terms of service, according to the two organizations. They say the content included in the report has been viewed up to 29 million times since March 25.”

PubMed: Inaccuracies in Google’s Health-Based Knowledge Panels Perpetuate Widespread Misconceptions Involving Infectious Disease Transmission

PubMed: Inaccuracies in Google’s Health-Based Knowledge Panels Perpetuate Widespread Misconceptions Involving Infectious Disease Transmission. “Google health-based Knowledge Panels were designed to provide users with high-quality basic medical information on a specific condition. However, any errors contained within Knowledge Panels could result in the widespread distribution of inaccurate health information. We explored the potential for inaccuracies to exist within Google’s health-based Knowledge Panels by focusing on a single well-studied pathogen, Ebola virus (EBOV).”

Joe Rogan and COVID disinformation: What he said and why he’s wrong (CNET)

CNET: Joe Rogan and COVID disinformation: What he said and why he’s wrong. “Rogan has questioned the use of masks, promoted the use of hydroxychloroquine as a COVID remedy on his show. He’s also regularly brought on guests to discuss the use of Vitamin D in helping ease COVID-19 symptoms. Joe Rogan has also come under fire in the past for lending his massive platform to controversial voices like Alex Jones.”

PsyPost: Five minutes of exposure to fake news can unconsciously alter a person’s behavior, study finds

PsyPost: Five minutes of exposure to fake news can unconsciously alter a person’s behavior, study finds. “A study published in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that brief exposure to online misinformation can unknowingly alter a person’s behavior. The experiment found that reading a fake news article slightly altered participants’ unconscious behavior, as evidenced by a change in their performances on a test called the Finger Tapping Test.”

EurekAlert: NYU Abu Dhabi researchers design simulator to help stop the spread of ‘fake news’

EurekAlert: NYU Abu Dhabi researchers design simulator to help stop the spread of ‘fake news’. “To improve news literacy and reduce the spread of misinformation, NYUAD Center for Cybersecurity researcher and lead author Nicholas Micallef is part of a team that designed Fakey, a game that emulates a social media news feed and prompts players to use available signals to recognize and scrutinize suspicious content and focus on credible information. Players can share, like, or fact-check individual articles.”

Report: China, Russia fueling QAnon conspiracy theories (Yahoo News)

Yahoo News: Report: China, Russia fueling QAnon conspiracy theories. “Foreign-based actors, principally in China and Russia, are spreading online disinformation rooted in QAnon conspiracy theories, fueling a movement that has become a mounting domestic terrorism threat, according to new analysis of online propaganda by a security firm. The analysis by the Soufan Center, a New York-based research firm focused on national security threats, found that nearly one-fifth of 166,820 QAnon-related Facebook posts between January 2020 and the end of February 2021 originated from overseas administrators.”

Wired: In war zones, social media disinformation is costing lives

Wired: In war zones, social media disinformation is costing lives . “The organisation we work for, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, has spent the past 20 years mediating peace talks. We sit between rebel groups and governments and try to forge ceasefires and political negotiations. It’s risky work that doesn’t always pay off. In recent years, a new phenomenon has made an already difficult job much harder: sophisticated networks of mis- and dis-information on social media.”

Poynter: Fears about vaccines accounted for half of fact checks submitted to the Alliance database in March

Poynter: Fears about vaccines accounted for half of fact checks submitted to the Alliance database in March. “Vaccine falsehoods increased their share of the CoronaVirusFacts Alliance database in March, accounting for 49% of the 455 newly added claims. The database, which combines the work of more than 90 fact-checking organizations from more than 70 countries writing fact checks in more than 40 languages, has compiled more than 12,000 fact checks since the beginning of the infodemic.”

Mother Jones: The TikTok Trend That Has Immigration Lawyers Worried

Mother Jones: The TikTok Trend That Has Immigration Lawyers Worried. “TikTok’s ecosystem of immigration lawyers is a diverse one. There are plenty of zealous advocates attempting to explain in digestible sound bites convoluted, ever-changing policies. There is also potentially misleading content. Many of the advertisements seem to target undocumented Latin American immigrants with strong ties to the United States and few to no existing options for obtaining legal status.”

Vitamin D: The truth about an alleged Covid ‘cover-up’ (BBC)

BBC: Vitamin D: The truth about an alleged Covid ‘cover-up’. “There are many treatments that have been suggested for Covid-19. Hydroxychloroquine, Ivermectin and vitamin D – all are, or were, being studied. Suggesting that a treatment could be effective and then finding it isn’t upon further research is all part of the normal scientific process. But online, early or low quality research can be shared out of context. And the confusion this creates can be exploited by people promoting conspiracy theories.”

Al Jazeera: Facebook says will curb hate speech as Indian states go to polls

Al Jazeera: Facebook says will curb hate speech as Indian states go to polls. “Facebook has said it is taking steps to combat hate speech and misinformation in India as the world’s biggest democracy holds months-long multi-phase elections in four states and a federal territory. ‘We recognise that there are certain types of content, such as hate speech, that could lead to imminent, offline harm,’ the social networking giant said in a blog post dated March 30.”