Tubefilter: YouTube, Facebook, Twitter Try To Crack Down On Coronavirus Conspiracies

Tubefilter: YouTube, Facebook, Twitter Try To Crack Down On Coronavirus Conspiracies. “According to a new report from the Washington Post, people on Facebook have spread claims that the U.S. government created the virus or bought a patent for it, and have suggested the virus is a form of population control (again, created/deployed by the government). Twitter users are sharing racist claims that Chinese dietary habits sparked the virus. YouTube videos making similar claims are popping up, with one reportedly reaching at least 430K views.”

New York Times: Panic and Criticism Spread on Chinese Social Media Over Coronavirus

New York Times: Panic and Criticism Spread on Chinese Social Media Over Coronavirus. “Chinese citizens are overcoming a lack of reporting on the crisis in the state-run media by sharing their own videos and information about the coronavirus outbreak.”

NiemanLab: The Wuhan coronavirus is the latest front for medical misinformation. How will China handle it?

NiemanLab: The Wuhan coronavirus is the latest front for medical misinformation. How will China handle it?. “The Wuhan Coronavirus has infected more than 800 people, mostly in and around Wuhan, China, and killed at least 26. (This morning, a second case was confirmed in the United States, in Chicago. The virus has also been found in Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan, and Vietnam.) As was the case with the Ebola virus, the coronavirus outbreak is responsible for the spread of a lot of misinformation, although it’s early enough in the epidemic that we don’t yet have tons of info on what that misinformation looks like.”

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation

Nieman Lab: Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation. “If a photo has been ’shopped, was it changed just a little or a lot? Did the editing harmlessly change the white balance or fundamentally alter the reality the photo is supposed to represent? Is a tight crop excluding important context or appropriately directing a viewer’s focus to something? Then apply all of that to videos. Where’s the line between a deepfake and a cheapfake? Your head starts to hurt. The unsung heroes of the Internet are the people who develop the standards by which information gets encoded into structured data, and said heroes are now turning their attention to this particular problem, visual misinformation. ”

PetaPixel: Instagram is Now Hiding Photoshopped Photos

PetaPixel: Instagram is Now Hiding Photoshopped Photos. “In an effort to combat misinformation and fake news, Instagram recently rolled out a new feature that flags fake photos. But now some photographers are wondering whether the system is going too far and making it harder to share and view certain types of photography.”

Phys .org: You’re probably more susceptible to misinformation than you think

Phys. org: You’re probably more susceptible to misinformation than you think. “Ask people directly and most will tell you they don’t trust the news they see on social media. And a landmark study in 2019 found 43% of social media users admitted to sharing inaccurate content themselves. So people are certainly aware in principle that misinformation is common online. But ask people where they learned about the ‘facts’ that support their political opinions, and the answer will often be social media.”

Poynter: ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?’ has debunked 25 hoaxes in 6 episodes. What is the challenge now?

Poynter: ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?’ has debunked 25 hoaxes in 6 episodes. What is the challenge now?. “Since June 2019, when the International Fact-Checking Network awarded a $50,000 grant to Africa Check to develop ‘What’s Crap on WhatsApp?,’ a voice note show specially designed to be shared on the private message app, about 1,600 people have subscribed to the ‘appcast,’ which totals six episodes. In total, they have heard 25 falsehoods being debunked, 10 of them related to health issues.”