The University of Washington Daily: iSchool misinformation research reveals anti-vax communities growing on social media

The University of Washington Daily: iSchool misinformation research reveals anti-vax communities growing on social media. “Kolina Koltai, a postdoctoral scholar at the iSchool’s Center for an Informed Public, conducts research with a focus on the social media anti-vaccine movement and the role online communities play in facilitating these conversations. According to Koltai, since the introduction of various COVID-19 vaccines, there has been an increase in activity in anti-vax communities, as well as the emergence of a new vaccine hesitancy in the general population.”

Neowin: Microsoft, Intel, BBC and others form coalition to combat misinformation

Neowin: Microsoft, Intel, BBC and others form coalition to combat misinformation. “Misinformation and online content fraud has been rampant in the past few years with increased accessibility to technology. To combat this growing epidemic, various entities from the technology and media industry have joined forces to form the Coalition for Content Provenance and Authenticity (C2PA). Its members include Microsoft, Adobe, Arm, Intel, BBC, and Truepic.”

The Journal (Ireland): Misleading videos of ’empty’ hospitals being shared on social media are putting extra strain on health service, say hospitals

The Journal (Ireland): Misleading videos of ’empty’ hospitals being shared on social media are putting extra strain on health service, say hospitals. “STAFF AT A number of hospitals around the country have criticised videos on anti-Covid 19 social media pages which suggest that hospitals are secretly ‘empty’, describing them as wrong and misleading.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Political ads, fake news targeted in newly formed misinformation code

Sydney Morning Herald: Political ads, fake news targeted in newly formed misinformation code. “Political advertisements that misrepresent or deceive the public could also be prohibited and tools to help users know if they’ve been targeted by a political party are also expected to be introduced by the platforms in order to meet a series of commitments laid out in a voluntary misinformation and disinformation code of practice.”

Poynter: No, Bill Gates is not calling for ‘mandatory’ vaccinations

Poynter: No, Bill Gates is not calling for ‘mandatory’ vaccinations. “A YouTube video from Rebel News claims that Bill Gates is calling for the mandatory vaccination of all people, and states that the billionaire Microsoft co-founder wants pregnant people and children to be forced to take it. The video also claims that those who receive the vaccine will face a 1-in-10,000 chance of death. Both of these claims are Not Legit. Here’s how we fact-checked it.”

Washington Post: On social media, vaccine misinformation mixes with extreme faith

Washington Post: On social media, vaccine misinformation mixes with extreme faith. “In an insular world on the social media app TikTok, young Christians act out biblically inspired scenes in which they are forced to take a vaccine for the coronavirus, only to end up splattered in fake blood and on the brink of death. The melodramatic videos are an attempt to represent how the introduction of coronavirus vaccines could herald the biblical End Time. Along with hundreds of thousands of other vaccine-questioning posts by social media users all over the world, they’re demonstrating the ways in which health misinformation is targeting Christians, some reaching sizable audiences.”

Exclusive: Misinformation Increased After Capitol Riots Despite Social Media Bans (Cheddar)

Cheddar: Exclusive: Misinformation Increased After Capitol Riots Despite Social Media Bans. “Advertising analytics company DoubleVerify found in a report looking at trends from 2020 and the beginning of this year that there was a 21 percent increase in ‘inflammatory news and political content’ on websites, a term the company used to classify fake news and misinformation, in the week following the January 6 riots. It also found hate speech increased three times in the 10 days after the events compared to the same period before.”

AFP Fact Check: Social media posts mislead on New Zealand’s Covid-19 vaccination drive

AFP Fact Check: Social media posts mislead on New Zealand’s Covid-19 vaccination drive. “Multiple Facebook posts shared thousands of times in Thailand in February 2021 claim New Zealand has ‘returned to normal’ as ‘the majority of people have been vaccinated [for Covid-19]’. The posts shared screenshots of a video featuring New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern alongside a claim it shows her ‘encouraging people to do outdoor activities to prove that New Zealand has finally returned to normal’. ”

Mashable: The best podcasts on conspiracy theories and disinformation

Mashable: The best podcasts on conspiracy theories and disinformation. “Our list below includes some of the best podcast episodes, mini or limited series podcasts, and full-length podcasts that tackle dangerous conspiracy theories like QAnon, COVID-19 misinformation, political disinformation, Big Tech’s culpability for viral spread, and everything in between. From its history and psychology to more immediate current events and personal tolls, we sought out podcasts that covered these complex, interwoven issues from every possible angle.”

Politico: Social media hasn’t stopped anti-vaxxers. Now docs are fighting back.

Politico: Social media hasn’t stopped anti-vaxxers. Now docs are fighting back.. “Doctors and nurses trying to build confidence in Covid-19 vaccines on social media are mounting coordinated campaigns to combat anti-vaccination forces prevalent on those platforms. At the same time, public health groups are mobilizing a global network of vaccine advocates to come to their aid when they are attacked online by activists, who closely monitor certain hashtags and keywords. The groups use monitoring software to swiftly identify online attacks, then tap their networks to flood social media posts with supportive messages countering vaccine opponents.”

AP: The superspreaders behind top COVID-19 conspiracy theories

AP: The superspreaders behind top COVID-19 conspiracy theories. “College professors with no evidence or training in virology were touted as experts. Anonymous social media users posed as high-level intelligence officials. And from China to Iran to Russia to the United States, governments amplified claims for their own motives. The Associated Press collaborated with the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab on a nine-month investigation to identify the people and organizations behind some of the most viral misinformation about the origins of the coronavirus.”