The Meridian Star: Documents digitized in Governors’ Letters Project, volunteers needed

The Meridian Star: Documents digitized in Governors’ Letters Project, volunteers needed. “A documentary project led by a University of Southern Mississippi history professor that is digitizing more than 20,000 letters written to Mississippi governors during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods has launched its first 2,000 documents online. The project, which is a feature of USM’s prestigious Dale Center for the Study of War & Society, is also seeking volunteers for assistance with transcription of original documents.”

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public

AP: Case files on 1964 civil rights worker killings made public. “The 1964 killings of civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner in Neshoba County sparked national outrage and helped spur passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. They later became the subject of the movie ‘Mississippi Burning.’” While the files have been made public, they have not yet been digitized.

University of Southern Mississippi: Online Exhibit Details Anti-Communism Efforts in State

University of Southern Mississippi: Online Exhibit Details Anti-Communism Efforts in State. “‘Seeing Red: Anti-Communism Efforts in Mississippi, 1944-1968’ was organized by Jennifer Brannock, professor and curator of Rare Books and Mississippiana in University Libraries using items housed in Special Collections that feature various aspects of the anti-communism movement in the state.”

Mississippi Today: House advances bill that would entangle Mississippi Archives and History board in politics

Mississippi Today: House advances bill that would entangle Mississippi Archives and History board in politics. “A bill that has angered many state historians would have the governor and lieutenant governor appoint members to the board that oversees the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, a move opponents say would politicize an agency that has remained above that fray for more than 100 years.”

Mississippi State University: MSU Libraries documents African American legislators in Mississippi with historical, online ‘Against All Odds’ exhibit

Mississippi State University: MSU Libraries documents African American legislators in Mississippi with historical, online ‘Against All Odds’ exhibit. “Titled ‘Against All Odds: The First Black Legislators in Mississippi,’ the exhibit documents the lives of over 150 African American men who worked in the state legislature leading up to 1894. The site features more than 800 newspaper clippings, dozens of portraits, quotes from primary and secondary sources, and biographies.”

University of Southern Mississippi: USM Professor Wins $350,000 Grant to Digitize Governors’ Papers, Employ Dozens of Students

University of Southern Mississippi: USM Professor Wins $350,000 Grant to Digitize Governors’ Papers, Employ Dozens of Students. “A digital history project based at The University of Southern Mississippi recently won a three-year grant totaling $349,987 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant, which was awarded to the Civil War & Reconstruction Governors of Mississippi (CWRGM) project led by Dr. Susannah J. Ural will also help to employee dozens of graduate students to work on the project.”

Celebrating Black History: MSU Libraries to digitize records of enslaved Mississippians for the first time (Mississippi State University)

Mississippi State University: Celebrating Black History: MSU Libraries to digitize records of enslaved Mississippians for the first time. “This undertaking compiles a wealth of 19th-century documents from across the South and, upon completion, will provide a fully text-searchable, indexed collection containing digital images of original documents that include individuals’ names and detailed physical descriptions. Primarily inspired by patron need, the project is based on a similar effort at the Virginia Museum of History and Culture called ‘Unknown No Longer.’”

Mississippi Department of Archives and History: Digitized Newspapers Available Online

Mississippi Department of Archives and History: Digitized Newspapers Available Online. “Researchers from around the world now have free online access to hundreds of Mississippi newspapers. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) participated in the National Digital Newspaper Program, a project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to digitize newspapers across the country. The publications are accessible through the Library of Congress on its Chronicling America website, along with papers from other participating states.”

Time capsule: Looking back, through the lens of Carl Brown’s camera (The Dispatch)

The Dispatch: Time capsule: Looking back, through the lens of Carl Brown’s camera . “For more than four decades, Carl Eugene Brown (1918-1998) was a recorder of history in Lowndes County and its surrounds. Frame by frame, he photographed community celebrations, grand openings, recitals, animals, businesses, proms, plays and portraits — the milestones and the everyday. A collection of about 20,000 of Brown’s negatives and prints was donated to the Billups-Garth Archives at the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library in 2016 by Sam Laffoon, owner of The Grapevine, in memory of his late wife, Kittie C. Laffoon. “

Jackson Free Press: MSU Digitizes Endangered Citizens Council Radio Tapes

Jackson Free Press: MSU Digitizes Endangered Citizens Council Radio Tapes. “On those tapes, the state’s old leaders often revel in their opposition to civil rights and support for segregation, revealing much about Mississippi’s political culture in the tumultuous years of the 1950s and 1960s. In one recording, [John Bell] Williams, who was then a Democratic congressman, calls the Civil Rights Act ‘the most monstrous piece of tyrannical legislation ever considered by Congress.’ In another, [Ross] Barnett, who was no longer governor at the time, claims communists are behind the civil rights movement. Digital recordings of those tapes, MSU libraries announced Thursday, are now available online.”

Ole Miss News: Mississippi Encyclopedia Debuts Online

Ole Miss News: Mississippi Encyclopedia Debuts Online. “The online version of the 1,451-page Mississippi Encyclopedia, a project that began at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture in 2003 and concluded with publication in 2017, is now available… The Mississippi Encyclopedia offers a breadth of topics unavailable anywhere else, with entries on every county, every governor, and numerous musicians, writers, artists and activists in the state. It is the first encyclopedic treatment of the state since 1907.”