MIT News: A comprehensive catalogue of human digestive tract bacteria

MIT News: A comprehensive catalogue of human digestive tract bacteria. “The human digestive tract is home to thousands of different strains of bacteria. Many of these are beneficial, while others contribute to health problems such as inflammatory bowel disease. Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute have now isolated and preserved samples of nearly 8,000 of these strains, while also clarifying their genetic and metabolic context.”

MIT News: The MIT Press releases a comprehensive report on open-source publishing software

MIT News: The MIT Press releases a comprehensive report on open-source publishing software. “The MIT Press has announced the release of a comprehensive report on the current state of all available open-source software for publishing. ‘Mind the Gap,’ funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, ‘shed[s] light on the development and deployment of open source publishing technologies in order to aid institutions’ and individuals’ decision-making and project planning,’ according to its introduction. It will be an unparalleled resource for the scholarly publishing community and complements the recently released Mapping the Scholarly Communication Landscape census.”

MIT News: MIT Press and Harvard Data Science Initiative launch the Harvard Data Science Review

MIT News: MIT Press and Harvard Data Science Initiative launch the Harvard Data Science Review. “The MIT Press and the Harvard Data Science Initiative (HDSI) have announced the launch of the Harvard Data Science Review (HDSR). The open-access journal, published by MIT Press and hosted online via the multimedia platform PubPub, an initiative of the MIT Knowledge Futures group, will feature leading global thinkers in the burgeoning field of data science, making research, educational resources, and commentary accessible to academics, professionals, and the interested public. “

MIT News: Toward artificial intelligence that learns to write code

MIT News: Toward artificial intelligence that learns to write code. “Learning to code involves recognizing how to structure a program, and how to fill in every last detail correctly. No wonder it can be so frustrating. A new program-writing AI, SketchAdapt, offers a way out. Trained on tens of thousands of program examples, SketchAdapt learns how to compose short, high-level programs, while letting a second set of algorithms find the right sub-programs to fill in the details.”

The Verge: AI translation boosted eBay sales more than 10 percent

The Verge: AI translation boosted eBay sales more than 10 percent. “We often hear that artificial intelligence is important for economic growth, and while that claim makes intuitive sense, there isn’t a lot of hard data to back it up. A recent study from economists at MIT and Washington University in St. Louis offers some proof, though, showing how AI tools boost trade by allowing sellers to cross the language barrier.”

Engadget: MIT finds smaller neural networks that are easier to train

Engadget: MIT finds smaller neural networks that are easier to train. “Despite all the advancements in artificial intelligence, most AI-based products still rely on ‘deep neural networks,’ which are often extremely large and prohibitively expensive to train. Researchers at MIT are hoping to change that. In a paper presented today, the researchers reveal that neural networks contain ‘subnetworks’ that are up to 10 times smaller and could be cheaper and faster to teach.”

MIT News: Better email automation

MIT News: Better email automation . “YouPS, which is still in a testing phase, lets users write more specific filter rules for incoming emails. Users can add multiple editor tabs, each related to a separate email mode, and they can also write different rules for each mode, so that their inbox behaves differently depending on the current one. You might not want emails from a campus mailing list during a summer vacation, for example, or you might want the option of muting a pesky emailer who sent too many messages within a short period of time.”