Nieman Lab: People read news differently (i.e., worse) on phones than they do on desktop, new research suggests

Nieman Lab: People read news differently (i.e., worse) on phones than they do on desktop, new research suggests. “People seem to pay better attention to news presented on desktop than on mobile. What changes as people read more news on mobile than desktop? A new paper by Texas A&M’s Johanna Dunaway, Kathleen Searles, Mingxiao Sui, and Newly Paul, published in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (h/t Jane Elizabeth) looks at this.” There’s some other interesting bits in this roundup as well.

Search Engine Land: Google releases Mobile Scorecard & Impact Calculator tools to illustrate importance of mobile page speed

Search Engine Land: Google releases Mobile Scorecard & Impact Calculator tools to illustrate importance of mobile page speed. “Google has focused on getting marketers and site owners to improve mobile site experiences for many years now. On Monday at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the search giant announced the release of two new mobile benchmarking resources to help in this effort: a new Mobile Scorecard and a conversion Impact Calculator.”

The Verge: Google will stop letting sites use AMP format to bait and switch readers

The Verge: Google will stop letting sites use AMP format to bait and switch readers. “Google today announced a forthcoming update to its Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP, web format that aims to discourage website owners from misusing the service. The company says that, starting in February 2018, AMP pages must contain content nearly identical to that of the standard page they’re replicating.”

NYT: Google Helping Mobile Publishing? Some Publishers Are Not So Sure

The New York Times: Google Helping Mobile Publishing? Some Publishers Are Not So Sure. “Last month, Federico Viticci, who runs MacStories, a news site devoted to Apple and its products, made a change in how the site publishes articles for mobile gadgets. MacStories, he declared, would no longer support a Google-backed method for faster loading of mobile web pages, called AMP.”

IAB Calls for New Mobile Ad Guidelines

The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) is proposing changes to mobile ad guidelines. “The proposed changes, which are open for industry comments until Jan. 30, frequently call for companies that serve ads in apps to provide more information to marketers. The new guidelines will call on companies serving in-app ads to tell advertisers whether consumers let the app access their devices’ locations, for example, and to provide further data about users’ whereabouts.”

Blogger Expresses Concern Over How Google Handles AMP Pages

A blogger is expressing concern about how Google handles AMP traffic. “I run my blog on WordPress with a custom theme. 6 month ago I’ve added support for Accelerate Mobile Pages (AMP) in order to provide better user for mobile devices. I did not research the AMP project well and have made some costly false assumptions that I wanted to share. Most importantly, I was surprised to find out that instead of redirecting users to an optimized version hosted on my server, Google was actually serving a snapshot of the page from their own cache.” Guy bent over backwards to be fair to Google and has documented his concern thoroughly.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Updates Its Archives for Mobile Access

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has updated its university archives. “Embry-Riddle’s University Archives has a new and improved look. In tribute to the university’s 90th anniversary this year, the Archives redesigned its database and upgraded its software to a new version that allows public access to historical records via mobile devices. Users of the archival database can search for such materials as alumni memorabilia, audio recordings, corporate records, newspaper clippings, photographs, video media, and many artifacts, including awards and aviation paraphernalia.”

Publishers on Google AMP: Meh

Publishers are giving Google’s AMP project a resounding “meh”. Can you give a resounding meh? It would have to be just an apathetic meh, wouldn’t it? “AMP — considered Google’s answer to Facebook Instant Articles — is basically open-source code that strips down web pages so they load faster on mobile devices. It’s free to any publisher to implement. The extra carrot is that publishers that don’t play along risk being disadvantaged in Google’s search results, as Google has made it clear that its algorithm gives preference to faster loading articles. Two publishers, Slate and The Atlantic, said they’ve been formatting nearly all their content for AMP, but that AMP pages are accounting for 4 percent of their site visits or less. ”

HBR: The Decline of Yahoo In Its Own Words

From HBR: The Decline of Yahoo in Its Own Words. “Plenty of theories have been put forth to explain Yahoo’s failures, as the company seeks a buyer following a failed turnaround attempt. One of the most prominent is that Yahoo was late to mobile. ‘Yahoo’s mobile business barely existed’ when Marissa Mayer took over as CEO in 2012, wrote Vauhini Vara at The New Yorker. Mayer was tasked with bringing Yahoo into the ‘smartphone era’ a full five years after it had started. By then Apple and Google were already dominant in mobile operating systems, and Facebook was surging ahead in apps. Perhaps by 2012 it was already too late.”

Mobile Ad Blocking Takes a Big Jump

Wow: mobile ad blocking jumped 90 percent in the last year. “Thirty-six percent of smartphone owners in the Asia-Pacific region now block ads on the mobile web, including nearly two-thirds of all smartphone owners in India and Indonesia. Mobile ad blockers are comparatively less popular in Europe and North America, where 14 million people regularly use them. Just 4.3 million Americans — around 2 percent of the smartphone owning population — use mobile ad blockers, compared with 159 million people in China.”

How Mobile Readers Get News From Facebook and Twitter

From Pew (pew pew pew pew!): How mobile readers get news via Facebook and Twitter. “Facebook sends by far the most mobile readers to news sites of any social media site, while Twitter mobile users spend more engaged time with news content, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of audience behavior metrics from 30 news sites. This gap holds true for both longer and shorter news articles.”