The New York Times: How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It

The New York Times: How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It. “One secret to longevity as a pundit is to issue predictions that can’t be easily checked. So here’s one for the time capsule: Two hundred years from now, give or take, the robot-people of Earth will look back on the early years of the 21st century as the beginning of a remarkable renaissance in art and culture.”

TheNextWeb: CityFalcon is like Feedly for money – and it’s awesome

This sounds useful if you like to follow finance news. From TheNextWeb: CityFalcon is like Feedly for money – and it’s awesome. “I’ve made it my goal for 2017 to read more finance news. The problem is knowing where to look. There are hundreds (if not thousands) of money-oriented blogs, websites, and twitter feeds, with some more reliable than others. Enter CityFalcon.”

​Google: We’re hiking bug bounties because finding security flaws is getting tougher (ZDNet)

ZDNet: ​Google: We’re hiking bug bounties because finding security flaws is getting tougher. “Google has raised its top reward for remote code execution bugs in its Google, Blogger and YouTube domains from an even $20,000 to $31,337, marking a 50 percent rise plus a bonus $1,337 or ‘leet’ reward. It’s also bumped up its ‘Unrestricted file system or database access’ reward by 30 percent plus ‘leet’ to $13,337.”

NBC News: Yahoo Security Breaches Cost Marissa Mayer Millions in Bonus, Stocks

NBC News: Yahoo Security Breaches Cost Marissa Mayer Millions in Bonus, Stocks. “Yahoo is punishing CEO Marissa Mayer and parting ways with its top lawyer for the mishandling of two security breaches that exposed the personal information of more than 1 billion users and already have cost the company $350 million.” So instead of getting paid a jillion dollars she only gets half a jillion?

Web Site Provides Information on Spending Votes from Your Representatives

A Web site launched in early February tracks the spending that congresspeople are voting for. “This powerful tool has been on our workbench here at the Coalition for nearly the past two years. And every day has been worth it to build a robust methodology and framework that will now easily capture every single spending vote and display it online, in real time, for everyone to see.” Really well designed, easy to use.

New Web Site Wants to Bring Transparency to Banking Fees

A new Web site promises to help users uncover hidden bank fees. “Bank Fee Finder is an important tool that helps Americans improve their financial well-being. Most people drastically underestimate how much they pay in bank fees, including ATM, overdrafts, late fees, and any other bank fees. In a study conducted by Common Cents, most people reported paying $5 per month, on average, in ATM, overdraft, and monthly service fees. Yet, a 2016 study conducted by TransferWise revealed that American households spend about $25 a month, or $290 a year in bank fees on average. Unexpected bank fees are especially relevant given another Common Cents study that found 36% of households have less than $500 in savings (including retirement savings).”

I like the idea but you have to supply your online banking information, and I ain’t doing that. It would be nice if you could get some fee information without immediately going to that level of trust.

NMPolitics: Secretary of state posts officials’ financial disclosure statements online

NMPolitics: Secretary of state posts officials’ financial disclosure statements online. “The Secretary of State’s Office was noncommittal for years about posting annual financial disclosure statements filed by hundreds of government officials online. Gov. Susana Martinez hasn’t kept up with her pledge to post them on her website either (the last time she did so was in 2013). No worries.”