No cash, please, we’re skittish: How coronavirus has spawned fear of paper money (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: No cash, please, we’re skittish: How coronavirus has spawned fear of paper money. “No longer a thing to be shoved mindlessly into a pocket, tucked into a worn wallet or thrown casually on a kitchen counter, paper money has seen its status change during the virus era — perhaps irrevocably. The pandemic has also reawakened the debate about the continued viability of what has been the lifeblood of global economies: physical bank notes and coins.”

CNBC: American billionaires got $434 billion richer during the pandemic

CNBC: American billionaires got $434 billion richer during the pandemic. “America’s billionaires saw their fortunes soar by $434 billion during the U.S. lockdown between mid-March and mid-May, according to a new report. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg had the biggest gains, with Bezos adding $34.6 billion to his wealth and Zuckerberg adding $25 billion, according to the report from Americans for Tax Fairness and the Institute for Policy Studies’ Program for Inequality. The report is based on Forbes data for America’s more than 600 billionaires between March 18, when most states were in lockdown, and May 19.”

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Guide to coronavirus mortgage relief options

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Guide to coronavirus mortgage relief options. “If you’re among those financially impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, you might be concerned about how to pay your mortgage or rent. Federal and state governments, as well as financial institutions and loan servicers, have announced plans to help struggling homeowners during this time. Keep reading to get information on what to do now, and what your options are for mortgage, rental relief, and utility disconnections.”

Mashable: Relying on crowdfunding to pay health bills? It’s more common than you might think.

Mashable: Relying on crowdfunding to pay health bills? It’s more common than you might think.. “Researchers from NORC at the University of Chicago recently conducted a survey to learn about the prevalence of crowdfunding health campaigns. It turns out that a large swath of the American public — approximately 50 million, or 20 percent of Americans — have contributed to these sorts of campaigns. What’s more, eight million Americans have started a campaign to help pay for medical expenses for themselves or someone in their household, while 12 million had started a campaign for someone else. According to the researchers’ survey, that’s three percent and five percent, respectively.”

YouTube’s top earners: Eight-year-old Ryan tops list with $26m (BBC)

BBC: YouTube’s top earners: Eight-year-old Ryan tops list with $26m. “An eight-year-old boy who reviews toys has been named as the highest earning YouTuber, for the second year in a row. Ryan, of Ryan’s World, earned $26m (£20m) in 2019, up from $22m in 2018, according to an annual top-10 ranking by Forbes, based on estimated earnings between June 2018 and June 2019.”

Federal Reserve Board: Federal Reserve Board launches new Twitter account highlighting research published in the Board’s working papers and notes series, other staff articles, and conferences

Federal Reserve Board: Federal Reserve Board launches new Twitter account highlighting research published in the Board’s working papers and notes series, other staff articles, and conferences. “The Federal Reserve Board on Wednesday launched a new Twitter account aimed at increasing access to the research done by the more than 400 economists and other research staff at the Board.”

Deciphering The True Cost Of College: Online Tool Aims To Help Students Predict Payment (Vermont Public Radio)

Vermont Public Radio: Deciphering The True Cost Of College: Online Tool Aims To Help Students Predict Payment. “One of the first things students embarking on a college search learn is just how expensive college tuition can be. The sticker price for a single year’s tuition at private colleges and universities can top $50,000, not including costs such as books and on-campus room and board. But what students also quickly learn is that, between grants, scholarships and need-based financial aid, many students don’t pay the sticker price…. So how is a potential college student supposed to know what a school will charge them before they apply?”