New York Times: Prosecutors Struggle to Catch Up to a Tidal Wave of Pandemic Fraud

New York Times: Prosecutors Struggle to Catch Up to a Tidal Wave of Pandemic Fraud. “As the virus shuttered businesses and forced people out of work, the federal government sent a flood of relief money into programs aimed at helping the newly unemployed and boosting the economy. That included $3.1 trillion that former President Donald J. Trump approved in 2020, followed by a $1.9 trillion package signed into law in 2021 by President Biden. But those dollars came with few strings and minimal oversight. The result: one of the largest frauds in American history, with billions of dollars stolen by thousands of people, including at least one amateur who boasted of his criminal activity on YouTube.”

Bloomberg: EU reaches agreement on crypto regulation requiring personal data collection on every transfer

Bloomberg: EU reaches agreement on crypto regulation requiring personal data collection on every transfer. “The European Parliament and Council reached a provisional agreement to force crypto providers to provide identifying information on all digital asset transactions, despite an industry backlash. The so-called transfer of funds regulation, or TFR, seeks to strengthen anti-money-laundering requirements to ensure that crypto transfers can always be traced and suspicious transactions blocked.”

Roswell Daily Record: The Education Plan announces launch of new website

Roswell Daily Record: The Education Plan announces launch of new website. “The Education Plan, New Mexico’s 529 education savings program, has launched a new website with enhanced tools and resources to help parents, grandparents and individuals plan and save for future education…. The site features analysis of education costs, a glossary that defines common terms related to savings plans, a breakdown of tax benefits, an overview of qualified expenses and an interactive map to determine the 529 savings opportunities in each state, among other content and tools.”

The Conversation: How the Russia-Ukraine conflict has put cryptocurrencies in the spotlight

The Conversation: How the Russia-Ukraine conflict has put cryptocurrencies in the spotlight. “Our work examining the digital transformation of the accounting profession has led us to delve into the world of cryptocurrency to explore how it operates and how it is regulated. As the armed conflict between Ukraine and Russia rages on, countries’ interest in regulating cryptocurrency has never been so urgent. The conflict between Ukraine and Russia is not just a war of bombs and bullets. It is also a digital war of which cryptocurrency is just one of many components.”

TikTok and Instagram have made personal finance cool: The trick is finding the good stuff (Globe and Mail)

Globe and Mail: TikTok and Instagram have made personal finance cool: The trick is finding the good stuff. “Bloggers and YouTubers have been creating down-to-earth and friendly financial content since well before the pandemic. But financial advice on platforms like TikTok and Instagram exploded when COVID-19 restrictions and a 21-month stock market rally drew scores of home-bound millennial and Gen Z novices to financial markets and to seek out online money-management information. Of course, plenty of financial advice on social media is factually wrong or outright fraudulent. But some successful financial influencers, or finfluencers, see themselves as educators who can speak to individuals and life challenges often neglected by traditional sources.”

The ASEAN Post: How To Disrupt The Fake News Market

The ASEAN Post: How To Disrupt The Fake News Market. “The fake news market depends on the exchange of online attention for money. An effective strategy to combat it must reset this equation. While governments devise legal measures to hold content creators and marketers accountable for disseminating fake news, ordinary people also must take responsibility for their role in spreading misinformation. “

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: ICIJ releases the Russia Archive, an inside look at how elites close to Putin hide wealth offshore

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: ICIJ releases the Russia Archive, an inside look at how elites close to Putin hide wealth offshore . “Using tens of millions of leaked files, ICIJ reveals the hidden wealth and financial secrets of Russia’s most powerful people, including oligarchs, political leaders, and proxies close to Vladimir Putin.”

Business Insider: Search the assets, investments, outside employment, and debts of congressional lawmakers using Insider’s exclusive databases

Business Insider: Search the assets, investments, outside employment, and debts of congressional lawmakers using Insider’s exclusive databases. “Insider has compiled and analyzed hundreds of US House and Senate financial disclosures to create a searchable, sortable, and near-complete accounting of members of Congress’ personal finances. The databases — one for the Senate and one for the House — include members of Congress’ individual assets, stock transactions, debts, and other outside income. They are the most complete and detailed public accounting of the individual finances of federal lawmakers.”

Sludge: Code for Democracy Debuts New Tool to Track Money in Politics

Sludge: Code for Democracy Debuts New Tool to Track Money in Politics. “Our two-person newsroom has worked with CFD’s tech & data lab over the past few months to help them develop features that will enable more campaign finance watchdogs to follow the money. With this free and open-source platform, people can design and save custom queries, create email alerts for when queries have new results, build data visualizations, download spreadsheets, and more. The results should be more investigative news stories and research reports connecting the dots between money moving and policy outcomes.”

BloombergQuint: Danish Artist Takes Museum’s Money and Runs, Calls It Artwork

BloombergQuint: Danish Artist Takes Museum’s Money and Runs, Calls It Artwork. “Jens Haaning had agreed with Kunsten museum, in northern Denmark, that he would borrow the money to replicate earlier work which displayed the annual incomes of an Austrian and a Dane. But when the museum in Aalborg opened the box that Haaning had shipped, the cash was missing from the two glass frames and the artwork’s title had been changed.” The money he took equals about $84,000 USD.

Motley Fool: These Free Tools Will Make Anyone a Better Investor

Motley Fool: These Free Tools Will Make Anyone a Better Investor. “In this episode of Industry Focus: Tech, we take a break from talking about specific companies to loop listeners in on our go-to free resources for information on companies. We give a rundown of our favorite primary and secondary resources for information and spend some time talking about the decision that leveled the playing field for the average investor.” Video podcast with captions AND a complete transcript.