Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones . “TEN YEARS AGO, it wasn’t possible for most people to use 3D technology to print authentic copies of human bones. Today, using a 3D printer and digital scans of actual bones, it is possible to create unlimited numbers of replica bones — each curve and break and tiny imperfection intact — relatively inexpensively. The technology is increasingly allowing researchers to build repositories of bone data, which they can use to improve medical procedures, map how humans have evolved, and even help show a courtroom how someone died. But the proliferation of faux bones also poses an ethical dilemma — and one that, prior to the advent of accessible 3D printing, was mostly limited to museum collections containing skeletons of dubious provenance.”

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle

The New York Times: Facebook Gives Workers a Chatbot to Appease That Prying Uncle. “Some Facebook employees recently told their managers that they were concerned about answering difficult questions about their workplace from friends and family over the holidays…So just before Thanksgiving, Facebook rolled out something to help its workers: a chatbot that would teach them official company answers for dealing with such thorny questions.” This is so on-brand I laughed out loud.

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics. “The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics has been chosen by the National Human Genome Research Institute to help lead the development of a coordinating hub for information on the ethical, legal and social implications of genetic research.”

An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC (University of St. Thomas)

University of St. Thomas: An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC. “Business Ethics Resource Center includes ethics and compliance resources from nationally and internationally recognized ethics and compliance centers, consortia and organizations, experts and thought leaders, qualified academics and practitioners, and industry groups.”

University of Southern California: Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violent

University of Southern California: Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violent. “Moral rhetoric on Twitter may signal whether a protest will turn violent, according to a USC-led study. The USC researchers also found that people are more likely to endorse violence when they moralize the issue that they are protesting — that is, when they see it as an issue of right and wrong. That holds true when they believe that others in their social network moralize the issue, too.”