‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘Morally Impossible’: Some Advertisers Take a Timeout From Facebook. “Ever since Mark Zuckerberg defended the platform’s hands-off policy toward posts by President Trump that contained misinformation or promoted violence, some companies are staying away.”

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses

New York Times: ‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses. “Many students still see employment in tech as a ticket to prosperity, but for job seekers who can afford to be choosy, there is a growing sentiment that Silicon Valley’s most lucrative positions aren’t worth the ethical quandaries.”

An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC (University of St. Thomas)

University of St. Thomas: An Ethics Resource at Your Fingertips: Meet BERC. “Business Ethics Resource Center includes ethics and compliance resources from nationally and internationally recognized ethics and compliance centers, consortia and organizations, experts and thought leaders, qualified academics and practitioners, and industry groups.”

New York Times: Do You Have a Moral Duty to Leave Facebook?

New York Times: Do You Have a Moral Duty to Leave Facebook?. “I joined Facebook in 2008, and for the most part, I have benefited from being on it. Lately, however, I have wondered whether I should delete my Facebook account. As a philosopher with a special interest in ethics, I am using ‘should’ in the moral sense. That is, in light of recent events implicating Facebook in objectionable behavior, is there a duty to leave it?”

The Week: The quest to design an ethical social media platform

The Week: The quest to design an ethical social media platform. “Social media use is pervasive in our culture. And it’s on the rise. At the start of this year, there were almost 3.2 billion people using social networks worldwide, up 13 percent from 2017. There are more than 11 new users every second. Meanwhile, we’re learning about the damage excessive social media use can do to our health and our society. As awareness of the pitfalls of being constantly connected grows, a small number of tech professionals are working to introduce ethical principles into social media design. But what does an ethical social media platform actually look like?”

TechCrunch: Big tech must not reframe digital ethics in its image

TechCrunch: Big tech must not reframe digital ethics in its image . “Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s visage loomed large over the European parliament this week, both literally and figuratively, as global privacy regulators gathered in Brussels to interrogate the human impacts of technologies that derive their power and persuasiveness from our data. The eponymous social network has been at the center of a privacy storm this year. And every fresh Facebook content concern — be it about discrimination or hate speech or cultural insensitivity — adds to a damaging flood.”

MIT Technology Review: Should a self-driving car kill the baby or the grandma? Depends on where you’re from

MIT Technology Review: Should a self-driving car kill the baby or the grandma? Depends on where you’re from. “In 2014 researchers at the MIT Media Lab designed an experiment called Moral Machine. The idea was to create a game-like platform that would crowdsource people’s decisions on how self-driving cars should prioritize lives in different variations of the ‘trolley problem.’ In the process, the data generated would provide insight into the collective ethical priorities of different cultures. The researchers never predicted the experiment’s viral reception.”

University of Southern California: Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violent

University of Southern California: Social media posts may signal whether a protest will become violent. “Moral rhetoric on Twitter may signal whether a protest will turn violent, according to a USC-led study. The USC researchers also found that people are more likely to endorse violence when they moralize the issue that they are protesting — that is, when they see it as an issue of right and wrong. That holds true when they believe that others in their social network moralize the issue, too.”

Nautilus: How Social Media Exploits Our Moral Emotions

Nautilus: How Social Media Exploits Our Moral Emotions . “Why does this keep happening? Because the architecture of social media exploits our sense of right and wrong, reaping profit from the pleasure we feel in expressing righteous outrage. The algorithms that undergird the flow of information on social media are, like the sensationalist print media and incendiary talk radio that came before them, designed to maximize ad revenue by engaging consumers’ attention to the fullest extent possible. Or as novelist John Green puts it, ‘Twitter is not designed to make you happier or better informed. It’s designed to keep you on Twitter.'”

MIT Technology Review: How to Hold Algorithms Accountable

From MIT Technology Review: How to Hold Algorithms Accountable. “Various industry efforts, including a consortium of Silicon Valley behemoths, are beginning to grapple with the ethics of deploying algorithms that can have unanticipated effects on society. Algorithm developers and product managers need new ways to think about, design, and implement algorithmic systems in publicly accountable ways. Over the past several months, we and some colleagues have been trying to address these goals by crafting a set of principles for accountable algorithms.”