Deadline: CAA Furloughs 275 Employees And Lets Go Of 90 Agents & Executives In A Bombshell Move

Deadline: CAA Furloughs 275 Employees And Lets Go Of 90 Agents & Executives In A Bombshell Move. “CAA has dropped a bombshell today. The agency has confirmed rumors that it has let go of 90 agents and executives, and has furloughed 275 employees because of the COVID-19 pandemic. This is the first layoff exercise that the agency has gone through, to this point, though technically the affected hourly employees aren’t being let go, they are being shelved for now. The agency will pay their health benefits through the length of the furlough, and those impacted can apply for unemployment to take some of the sting out of it.”

CNN: Universal and AMC Theatres strike a deal allowing new films to play at home sooner

CNN: Universal and AMC Theatres strike a deal allowing new films to play at home sooner. “Universal and AMC are mending their frayed relationship in a deal that not only reverses the theater chain’s ban on Universal’s movies but also appears to upend the traditional exclusivity model that studios and theaters have followed for decades.”

CNET: AMC moves back reopening as movies delay release dates

CNET: AMC moves back reopening as movies delay release dates. “AMC has again delayed the reopening of its nationwide movie theaters amid the coronavirus pandemic. Theaters in the US will ‘reopen in waves,’ with the first now planned to open in mid- to late August, AMC said Thursday, citing delays in movie release dates.”

Cinema Blend: Movie Theaters Launch New Campaign Seeking Help From U.S. Government

Cinema Blend: Movie Theaters Launch New Campaign Seeking Help From U.S. Government. “The new campaign #SaveYourCinema just launched online. It’s a form that asks users to send messages directly to their U.S. Senators and state representatives to support legislation that could provide a financial lifeline for movie theaters and theater chains.”

Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters (CNET)

CNET: Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters. “When the latest James Bond premiere was called off because of the coronavirus outbreak, it came as a shock. But that was just the first in a cascade of movie blockbusters being canceled or postponed, causing a reshuffle of the release schedule throughout 2020 and into 2021. And as movie theaters struggle to reopen, Christopher Nolan’s Tenet is the latest big-screen casualty.”

New York Times: Hollywood Stays Away From Facebook Ad Boycott

New York Times: Hollywood Stays Away From Facebook Ad Boycott. “The pharmaceutical giants Pfizer and Bayer have joined the anti-Facebook campaign. So have Microsoft and Verizon. Also represented are industries like apparel (Levi Strauss, Eddie Bauer), autos (Ford, Honda), household products (Unilever, Kimberly-Clark) and beverages (Coca-Cola, Starbucks). But one of Facebook’s most important advertising categories — Hollywood — has been noticeably silent even though stopping hate speech is one of the entertainment industry’s longtime causes.”

Deadline: ‘Empire Strikes Back’ Leads At The Weekend Box Office With $644K, 23 Years After Sequel’s Special Edition – Update

Deadline: ‘Empire Strikes Back’ Leads At The Weekend Box Office With $644K, 23 Years After Sequel’s Special Edition – Update. “In the current broken exhibition marketplace where 1,5K theaters are open, that’s a pretty potent weekend for a No 1 film, just under Ghostbusters‘ 5-day last weekend of $656K (but above that Ivan Reitman pic’s 3-day of $550K), Trolls World Tour‘s 4-day Memorial weekend of $656K (yes, same amount), and Jurassic Park‘s June 19-21 weekend which banked $517,6K over three-days according to industry estimates.”

Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters (CNET)

CNET: Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters. “When the latest James Bond premiere was called off because of the coronavirus outbreak, it came as a shock. But that was just the first in a cascade of movie blockbusters being canceled or postponed, causing a huge reshuffle of the release schedule throughout 2020 and into 2021.”

“Germ-Zapping Robots”: How Hollywood Might Kill Coronavirus Fears on Set (Hollywood Reporter)

Hollywood Reporter: “Germ-Zapping Robots”: How Hollywood Might Kill Coronavirus Fears on Set. “With plans for safely revving up production underway in Hollywood, the industry is looking at creative ways to make sure sets are sanitary in the age of COVID-19. One newly emerging strategy might have people wondering whether the pandemic is turning Hollywood into one of the sci-fi films it churns out: ‘germ-zapping robots.’ Yes, really. Hollywood has begun to take interest in a lab-certified disinfecting robot that uses pulses of ultraviolet (UV) light to kill SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.”

CNET: Coronavirus shut down Hollywood, but there may be a silver lining

CNET: Coronavirus shut down Hollywood, but there may be a silver lining. “Last month the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that, at least for next year’s Oscars ceremony, movies no longer need to fulfill a one-week run in a Los Angeles theater to be eligible for best picture. As long as a film had a scheduled theatrical release, it qualifies for a chance at an Oscar nomination. Out of the few films trickling out during the pandemic, several of the standouts were directed by women. These films could bring long-overdue recognition for female directors at the next Oscars, where women have historically missed out on nominations in the best director category.”

TechHive: The best online film festivals and virtual art house movie screenings

TechHive: The best online film festivals and virtual art house movie screenings. “Luckily, SXSW isn’t the only cancelled film festival that’s going virtual. A variety of the biggest national and regional film fests are taking their programs online, while some of the best art-house theaters are offering virtual screenings of new releases and repertory classics.”

Hollywood Reporter: Costume Designers Guild Sewing Masks for Health Care Facilities

Hollywood Reporter: Costume Designers Guild Sewing Masks for Health Care Facilities. “IATSE’s Theatre Wardrobe Locals, the Hollywood Costumers Local and Costume Designers Guild are leading an effort through which its members will sew protective masks for immediate distribution to health care facilities. The effort addresses the enormous shortage of masks, gloves and additional protective gear that doctors and other health care workers rely upon as they treat individuals with coronavirus symptoms.”

The Guardian: ‘Over one hour everything was cancelled’ – how coronavirus devastated the film industry

The Guardian: ‘Over one hour everything was cancelled’ – how coronavirus devastated the film industry. “This time last week, it still seemed feasible the film industry might weather coronavirus. Only a handful of big-name blockbusters had been postponed in the UK and US, Cannes remained bullish and box office numbers weren’t wobbling too much. By Monday, the picture was radically cracked.”

Subury Mercury: How new tech will help bring more film and TV productions to Suffolk

Sudbury Mercury: How new tech will help bring more film and TV productions to Suffolk. “Screen Suffolk’s parent company Film Fixer has created locationfinder.ai – a new online database where productions can search for locations by picture rather than just keyword. Location scouts can upload an image of the kind of building or location they are after, with the database coming up with matches of similar buildings or areas.”

The Verge: Hollywood is quietly using AI to help decide which movies to make

The Verge: Hollywood is quietly using AI to help decide which movies to make. “The film world is full of intriguing what-ifs. Will Smith famously turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix. Nicolas Cage was cast as the lead in Tim Burton’s Superman Lives, but he only had time to try on the costume before the film was canned. Actors and directors are forever glancing off projects that never get made or that get made by someone else, and fans are left wondering what might have been. For the people who make money from movies, that isn’t good enough.”