Library of Congress: 2017 National Film Registry Is More Than a ‘Field of Dreams’

Library of Congress: 2017 National Film Registry Is More Than a ‘Field of Dreams’. “Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced the 2017 selections to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Selected for their cultural, historic and/or aesthetic importance, these 25 motion pictures range from an early film of the New York subway in 1905 and the musical biopic “La Bamba” to the holiday action thriller “Die Hard” and “The Goonies,” the adventure tale of a band of misfits.”

New to Me: Primate Films Database

New to me: the Primate Films Database. From the homepage: “The Primate Films Database includes information about films featuring wild primates produced since the beginning of the twentieth century. The database contains entries for films (including feature films), TV specials, TV series, and single episodes of series. Currently the Primate Films Database focuses on films in which the main focus is on primates in wild settings, but it may be expanded in the future to include more films focusing on captive primates. The database includes general information about each film such as runtime, the featured species, and the narrator or host. A brief review of each film is also provided which focuses on the film’s usefulness in teaching and educational settings.” The database is available in its entirety as an 82-page PDF.

Abstracts: Social media and the rise of the impromptu documentary (Frederick News-Post)

Frederick News-Post: Abstracts: Social media and the rise of the impromptu documentary. “Documentaries are typically thought of as films with a nonfiction narrative that explore a topic of interest to viewers, like ‘Planet Earth’ and ‘Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.’ But in recent years, social media has begun to blur or aggregate — depending on your perspective — what we typically think of as a documentary, and how these are made. Could we consider it a documentary, if, for example, a woman were to record footage of men catcalling her on the streets of a busy city?”

Lohud: Which films got tax breaks? Check the first national database

Lohud: Which films got tax breaks? Check the first national database . “How much in public tax breaks has gone to films and television shows across the nation? The USA Today Network in New York spent months canvassing all 34 states that have film-incentive programs, finding that they allocate $1.3 billion breaks to productions. Of the states with programs — and about 10 have dropped them in recent years because of concerns about their economic value — 29 states responded to our requests for how much each film and show received over the past five years.”

Vermont Biz: Joint project provides online database of Vermont films, Vermont PBS archive for community use

Vermont Biz: Joint project provides online database of Vermont films, Vermont PBS archive for community use. “Vermont PBS and the Vermont International Film Foundation (VTIFF) today announced the launch of a joint online database of Vermont films and TV programs past and present, the Vermont Archive Movie Project (VAMP) database. This searchable resource will allow students, historians, filmmakers and the public at large to tap into the state’s rich history on film.”

Daily Bruin: Alumnus’ site helps filmmakers of all creeds find shoot locations

New-to-me, from The Daily Bruin: Alumnus’ site helps filmmakers of all creeds find shoot locations. “Wrapal is an online platform that connects filmmakers searching for film locations with property owners willing to rent their properties to filmmakers. There are more than 1,300 residential, commercial and industrial properties in Los Angeles and about 215 properties in New York City listed on Wrapal, Tan said.”

Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions

Talking New Media: Sight & Sound unveils digital archive with Exact Editions. “Published by the BFI since 1932 Sight & Sound has partnered with digital publishing experts Exact Editions to develop this comprehensive research tool for institutions, universities, schools and other organisations around the world. With the archive’s launch, film fanatics and academics anywhere will be able to study 85 years of back issues of the magazine, as well as its long-running sister publication Monthly Film Bulletin (1934-1991), at the click of a button.”