Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.

Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.. “The Stephen King Rules Dollar Baby Film Festival, a virtual event which will stream a number of short film adaptations based on the author’s work (including some which haven’t previously been released), is set to run from April 23 to 25 — and the best part is, the whole thing is free to join. 25 adaptations will be shown in total, each based on King short stories like Popsy, The Woman in the Room, and The Last Rung on the Ladder.”

Screen Rant: New Website Helpfully Compares Every Single Streaming Service’s Offerings

Screen Rant: New Website Helpfully Compares Every Single Streaming Service’s Offerings. “A new website Movie of the Night has a chart and graphs that separate content into various categories for people who want to watch something specific on a streaming service. The website includes the number of shows or movies that fit into a category and provides viewers with the list of content based on the five main streaming services: Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+, HBO Max, and Hulu. However, users also have the option to add Peacock, Paramount+, and more.”

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films

The Streamable: New Streaming Service Cultpix Debuts With 400 Classic Cult Films. “The platform will launch with a library of 400 cult classic and vintage films and TV shows. Looking to find an audience that has not been properly served by current providers, the content on Cultpix covers the gamut from Italian swordplay epics and Spanish horror to Swedish erotica and American slashers, seeking to draw from genre films published prior to the ’90s. The selection is expected to double by the end of the year thanks to a number of pending content deals.”

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films. “An analysis of film tropes–common storytelling elements seen in different movies–explores combinations of tropes that tend to co-occur in films, identifying patterns that could help inform development of new movies. Pablo García-Sánchez and Juan Merelo of the University of Granada, and Antonio Velez-Estevez and Manuel Cobo from the University of Cádiz, Spain present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 31, 2021.”

Inside COVID-Safe Movie Theaters: Sanitization Foggers, Plexiglass and New Popcorn Rules (Variety)

Variety: Inside COVID-Safe Movie Theaters: Sanitization Foggers, Plexiglass and New Popcorn Rules. “Imagine a magical weapon straight out of science fiction: a machine of gratifying, cartoonish proportions that unleashes a magic potion eradicating the scourge of the past and bringing families safely together. Except it’s not a Marvel prop, it’s an electrostatic disinfectant sprayer — a goofy but crucial piece of protective equipment that will become a staple for moviegoers in a post-pandemic world.”

The Hindu: A portal for film archives

The Hindu: A portal for film archives. “To this day, there is a gap in documenting and archiving the history of Kannada cinema in an accessible way, which a new online portal… aims to fill. The portal, designed with fonts from yesteryear film posters, is drenched in nostalgia for old films, songs, their history, trivia, and rare-to-find photographs. Kannada is a language spoken in India. You can learn more about it here.

Lifehacker: 11 Things to Stream If the Pandemic Stole Your European Vacation

Lifehacker: 11 Things to Stream If the Pandemic Stole Your European Vacation. “Whether you were planning to go to grad school in the UK or were finally going to take that long-planned trip to Greece, it’s likely the pandemic changed everything. Well, we’ve spent the last year living through our screens, so why stop now? While you can’t physically take that life-affirming trip, here are 11 transporting recent movies and TV series that will take the trip for you, giving you an approximation of that European vacation experience.”

Arizona State University: The end? How movie theaters move past the pandemic

Arizona State University: The end? How movie theaters move past the pandemic. “The coronavirus pandemic, social unrest and economic turbulence defined 2020. The past year has also changed the entertainment industry dramatically — and perhaps permanently. Has the pandemic led to the disappearance of movie theaters for good? Can storytelling industries adapt and become more representative of diversity and respond to cries for racial and social justice? How will Big Tech’s entrance into streaming impact the industry?”

Women’s History Month 2021: Movies and TV shows to uplift and inspire (CNET)

CNET: Women’s History Month 2021: Movies and TV shows to uplift and inspire. “Women’s History Month, which runs through the end of March, is a time to honor the vital role of women in history and celebrate their diverse achievements and stories. To mark the occasion, the CNET team has come up with a list of inspiring and illuminating movies and TV shows that explore the triumphs and challenges of the female experience. Some are documentaries, of activists, artists, politicians and more. Others are historical dramas that open a window on women’s lives in the past, or contemporary takes that feature compelling female characters navigating modern life.”

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond . “Photographs of fabulous film stars and fascinating interviews form part of a stunning new online showcase to capture 1930s cinemagoing in Britain. The website, to help researchers and the public in their quest for information about the silver screen in the 1930s and beyond, has just been launched.”

How I Wrote the Pandemic: The Writer of ‘Locked Down’ Explains (New York Times)

New York Times: How I Wrote the Pandemic: The Writer of ‘Locked Down’ Explains. “I called the screenwriter of ‘Locked Down,’ Steven Knight (the writer-director of ‘Locke’), in Gloucestershire, England, to talk about how he wrote the pandemic, what archaeologists will uncover about this era and the value of pre-empting the ‘tidiness’ of history. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.”

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+

Mashable: Everything to know about Documentary+ . “Documentary+ features a range of docs in categories like music, politics, culture, true crime, science & nature, icons, sports, comedy, and cults. The streaming platform houses everything from Academy Award-winning films to festival favorites. While you can catch classic documentaries like The Imposter, Born into Brothels, Cartel Land, My Best Fiend, and Life, Animated, you can also find movies created by filmmakers including Spike Jonze, Terrence Malick, Brett Morgen, and Davis Guggenheim.” The service is 100% free. As in, “You don’t even have to create an account to watch content,” free.

National Film and Sound Archive of Australia: Priceless Collection Of 100-year-old Films Digitally Restored

National Film and Sound Archive of Australia: Priceless Collection Of 100-year-old Films Digitally Restored. “The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) has digitally restored The Corrick Collection, containing 135 of the world’s earliest films, which formed part of the Corrick Family Entertainers variety act over 100 years ago. A selection of these priceless films will have a world premiere at Ten Days on the Island from 5-21 March 2021, to celebrate the Corricks’ connection with Tasmania. Further national and international screenings will be announced in coming months. Additionally, five films from The Corrick Collection are now available to audiences worldwide on the NFSA’s YouTube channel.”

Engadget: The Sundance Film Festival makes a giant leap into VR

Engadget: The Sundance Film Festival makes a giant leap into VR. “Like most major events over the last year, the esteemed Sundance Film Festival is going virtual. But it’s going beyond just letting you watch films at home. Sundance is building an extensive virtual reality platform for all attendees, which can be accessed with or without a VR headset. You can think of it as an evolution of the festival’s experience highlighting groundbreaking VR and new media projects with its New Frontier exhibition. Now, Sundance is transforming itself into a virtual reality destination.”