Economic Times: Film maker wins copyright infringement case against Google, YouTube

Economic Times: Film maker wins copyright infringement case against Google, YouTube. “Indian filmmaker Suneel Darshan has won a copyright infringement case against Google and its YouTube video-streaming platform, after an eight-year-long court battle.”

TechCrunch: Plex launches a free, ad-supported streaming service in over 200 countries

TechCrunch: Plex launches a free, ad-supported streaming service in over 200 countries. “Plex today is launching its own ad-supported streaming service, a rival to The Roku Channel, Tubi, Crackle, Vudu’s Movies on Us, and others that offer a way to stream movies and TV for free without a subscription. The service will feature several thousand movies and shows from studios like MGM, Warner Bros. Domestic Television Distribution, Lionsgate, and Legendary — deals which were previously announced leading up to today’s launch.”

World Intellectual Property Review: Baby Yoda GIFs back online after copyright confusion

World Intellectual Property Review: Baby Yoda GIFs back online after copyright confusion. “Viral GIFs (graphic interchange format) of a new Star Wars character, Baby Yoda, have been reinstated to a leading GIF sharing site after being temporarily removed over alleged copyright concerns.”

Subury Mercury: How new tech will help bring more film and TV productions to Suffolk

Sudbury Mercury: How new tech will help bring more film and TV productions to Suffolk. “Screen Suffolk’s parent company Film Fixer has created locationfinder.ai – a new online database where productions can search for locations by picture rather than just keyword. Location scouts can upload an image of the kind of building or location they are after, with the database coming up with matches of similar buildings or areas.”

Esquire: What to Read, Watch, and Listen to In Preparation For the Robot Apocalypse

Esquire: What to Read, Watch, and Listen to In Preparation For the Robot Apocalypse. “From Smart House to 2001: A Space Odyssey, pop culture tends to instill in our collective human consciousness a general distrust of technology. But somehow, we just don’t get sick of stories about the inevitable robot apocalypse. … To help guide you through our potential near-future terror, we’ve put together everything to see, read, and listen to from pop culture and academia. We’ll fill you in on how each one predicts what our robot-everything lives will look like, too.”

New York Times: Lights, Camera, TikTok

New York Times: Lights, Camera, TikTok. “If you’re over the age of 25, TikTok will make you feel about 100. The enormously popular Chinese social media video app is a colossal repository of viral comedy, virtuoso dance routines, daredevil stunts and talent-show theatrics, most of which seem to be performed by precocious teens. But also, TikTok has developed an interesting relationship to the movies.”

Popular Music in Movies and Television, 1920s – 1981

Another find via Reddit: a database covering popular music in movies and television from the 1920s to 1981. It’s called Lights, Camera Backbeat. From the About page: “LCB starts at the beginning of synchronised sound and film with early Vitaphone and Phonofilm musical shorts in the 1920’s and continues up to the birth of MTV in 1981. The 1980’s launched a new era in music on film with a massive increase in music videos produced for TV use as well as home video product on VCR and Betamax. Prior to 1981 there were often only limited chances to see major pop music performers on TV and in the cinema, particularly if you lived outside the USA.” I did a couple of quick searches; the database did not contain Paul Anka’s performances in GIRLS TOWN and did not contain Mamie Van Doren’s songs from UNTAMED YOUTH. So lots of results, but nowhere near complete.