Wanted dead or archive: how film-makers repurpose old footage (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Wanted dead or archive: how film-makers repurpose old footage. “A child sits on a rock ledge buckling his shoe. The camera zooms towards a mysterious dark shape behind him as the boy scampers towards us in fright. A black bear has just lumbered into view. We may never know how this scene played out, who shot it, or why. These grainy images unfurl from a dusty film canister found in a charity shop. Around the world, limitless hours of undiscovered footage like this lie waiting for a new audience; from forgotten newsreels to public information films, astral visions shot by astronauts to ‘found footage’ home movies. Welcome to the rich world of archive film-making.”

Virtual Cannes Market: Arab Cinema Centre and Telescope Film launch database of Arab films (Ahram Online)

Ahram Online: Virtual Cannes Market: Arab Cinema Centre and Telescope Film launch database of Arab films. “Within the Virtual Cannes Market’s events, and aiming to expand the scope of the Arab cinema’s exposure internationally, Telescope Film announced the launch of Arab Cinema Centre’s microsite. Arab Films and Where to Find Them! is the opening motto for the new microsite, as it serves as a comprehensive English-language guide to Arab cinema.”

Going to the movies in Fortnite: I did it for science (TechHive)

TechHive: Going to the movies in Fortnite: I did it for science. “Movie theaters aren’t anywhere near opening here in New York City (a wise thing, if you ask me), and the nearest traditional drive-in theater to Brooklyn is a 60-mile drive—not that I own a car, mind you. But I just did the next best thing to going to the movies: I watched Inception in Fortnite.”

When Hollywood finally noticed the web: What it got right and oh so wrong (CNET)

CNET: When Hollywood finally noticed the web: What it got right and oh so wrong. “It began in May 1995 with the release of Johnny Mnemonic, a delirious sci-fi action dystopia matching Keanu Reeves with seminal cyberpunk author William Gibson. In July, Sandra Bullock had her identity erased in conspiracy thriller The Net. In August, Denzel Washington pursued Russell Crowe’s computer-generated serial killer in Virtuosity, and in September Angelina Jolie found her breakthrough role in anarchic adventure Hackers. In October, Kathryn Bigelow served up dystopian thriller Strange Days.”

Chicago Reader: Black in Film is diversifying the industry

Chicago Reader: Black in Film is diversifying the industry. “Ramone Hulet was up late when the idea hit him. ‘It honestly came out of frustration,’ the Chicago filmmaker says over an afternoon Zoom call. ‘I was recently working on a set where we wanted to hire Black, but couldn’t.’ That’s when Hulet thought of it: a website that would act as a running list to connect Black creatives in the film industry with each other and non-Black filmmakers. Hulet worked until 1 AM that same night to finish the website and Black In Film was born.”

Study Breaks: The Power Of ‘Selfilm’ Is Inventing A New Cinematic Subgenre

Study Breaks: The Power Of ‘Selfilm’ Is Inventing A New Cinematic Subgenre. “It’s 7 p.m. and you’re ready to binge, assuming that content exists solely to comfort, to backload worries and delay the confrontation with the dreary world outdoors. Although the newly prescribed lifestyle of a hermit may precipitate greater escapism, it also welcomes the opportunity for self-exploration. It is impossible to regard film and television without one’s identity in mind, especially when so much of our quarantined lives are defined by the latest Netflix show. In an attempt to categorize and demystify this situation, an obscure word has found its way into my everyday thoughts: selfilm.”

New York Daily News: Movie theaters set to reopen with reduced capacity, cashless tickets and staggered showtimes

New York Daily News: Movie theaters set to reopen with reduced capacity, cashless tickets and staggered showtimes. “Both Regal and Cinemark announced they would start showing movies this month and next, introducing options such as cash-free online transactions, staggered showtimes, reduced theater capacity, lots and lots of cleaning and other measures to decontaminate surfaces and ensure social distancing protocols.”

Variety: Studios and Movie Theaters Want to Reopen, but Coronavirus May Still Scramble Plans

Variety: Studios and Movie Theaters Want to Reopen, but Coronavirus May Still Scramble Plans. “From delaying ‘Tenet’ by two weeks to pushing the Oscars by two months, Hollywood is scrambling to adjust to a new reality. In the coronavirus era, it’s nearly impossible to predict what the world will look like next week, much less for the rest of the year and even into 2021. Because of this persistent fluidity, studios have been gripped by a new and growing sense of uncertainty.”

Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters (CNET)

CNET: Coronavirus movie delays: New release dates for 2020 and 2021 blockbusters. “When the latest James Bond premiere was called off because of the coronavirus outbreak, it came as a shock. But that was just the first in a cascade of movie blockbusters being canceled or postponed, causing a huge reshuffle of the release schedule throughout 2020 and into 2021.”

Forbes: The American Black Film Festival Goes Online This Year

Forbes: The American Black Film Festival Goes Online This Year. “The American Black Film Festival will be taking place online only this year. The festival, overseen by ABFF Ventures LLC, has been running in person for the last 24 years. The annual fest usually draws 7,000 to 10,000 people to Miami Beach, but this year due to social distancing concerns and the coronavirus, the festival will take place on August 21-30, 2020… While it will be online only, the schedule will still boast studio premieres, conversation, panels, business of entertainment seminars and virtual networking events. ”

The Next Web: The Criterion Channel removes paywall on classic black cinema in support of Black Lives Matter

The Next Web: The Criterion Channel removes paywall on classic black cinema in support of Black Lives Matter . “The Criterion Channel, one of the lesser-known streaming services, this week removed the paywall on several important movies from black filmmakers, allowing anyone to watch them for free. It also expressed its support of the Black Lives Matter and its commitment to financial support of civil rights organizations.”

TechQuila: Analysts Predict Box Office to Plunge 50% due to Coronavirus Closures

TechQuila: Analysts Predict Box Office to Plunge 50% due to Coronavirus Closures. “Research company MoffettNathanson has predicted that movie theatre closures and the uncertainty due to the coronavirus pandemic will have a devastating impact on the box office. The Wall Street analyst firm has said that revenues from ticket sales will be cut in half, falling from $11.4 billion in 2019 to $5.5 billion in 2020. Now that’s a huge plunge, around 52%, and it can go steeper if cinemas do not open in July. There are a few big-budget movies lined up for July, which, if pushed back more, can create a devasting effect.”

WCCO: Walker Art Center Unveils Online Archive Of 3 Decades’ Worth Of Filmmaker Interviews, Retrospectives

WCCO: Walker Art Center Unveils Online Archive Of 3 Decades’ Worth Of Filmmaker Interviews, Retrospectives. “Over the course of the last three decades, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis has hosted retrospectives of many of the most internationally renowned contemporary filmmakers, as part of their Dialogues and Film Retrospectives series. The roster of luminaries highlighted by the Walker since 1990 includes directors like Clint Eastwood, Spike Lee, Robert Altman, Jane Campion, Werner Herzog, Agnes Varda, Abbas Kiarostami, Joel and Ethan Coen, Claire Denis, and John Waters; and also actors like Jodie Foster, Tom Hanks, Lily Taylor, and Harry Belafonte.”

“Germ-Zapping Robots”: How Hollywood Might Kill Coronavirus Fears on Set (Hollywood Reporter)

Hollywood Reporter: “Germ-Zapping Robots”: How Hollywood Might Kill Coronavirus Fears on Set. “With plans for safely revving up production underway in Hollywood, the industry is looking at creative ways to make sure sets are sanitary in the age of COVID-19. One newly emerging strategy might have people wondering whether the pandemic is turning Hollywood into one of the sci-fi films it churns out: ‘germ-zapping robots.’ Yes, really. Hollywood has begun to take interest in a lab-certified disinfecting robot that uses pulses of ultraviolet (UV) light to kill SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.”