Neowin: Mozilla is worried about being collateral damage in Google’s antitrust case

Neowin: Mozilla is worried about being collateral damage in Google’s antitrust case. “Yesterday, the United States Department of Justice filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the search giant of monopolistic practices to maintain its dominant position in the search market. Among the practices brought up in the case is the fact that Google pays to be in the default search engine on some devices and web browsers, such as Mozilla Firefox.”

Fast Company: DuckDuckGo, EFF, and others just launched privacy settings for the whole internet

Fast Company: DuckDuckGo, EFF, and others just launched privacy settings for the whole internet. “A group of tech companies, publishers, and activist groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, and DuckDuckGo are backing a new standard to let internet users set their privacy settings for the entire web.”

The Next Web: Mozilla needs your help to expose YouTube’s recommendation algorithm

The Next Web: Mozilla needs your help to expose YouTube’s recommendation algorithm. “After installing the RegretsReporter and playing a YouTube video, you can click the frowning face icon in your browser to report the video, the recommendations that led you to it, and any extra details on ‘your regret.’ Mozilla researchers will then search for patterns that led to the recommendations.”

IT Pro Today: Mozilla Shrinks to Survive Amid Declining Firefox Usage

IT Pro Today: Mozilla Shrinks to Survive Amid Declining Firefox Usage. “Mozilla has been watching the user share of its flagship Firefox web browser shrink for a while, so it was hardly a surprise last week when the company announced it was doing some belt tightening that would result in another round of layoffs. What was a surprise were the numbers involved: The company is laying off about 250 employees, for a staff reduction of 25%, and is completely closing its operations in Taipei, Taiwan. In addition, 60 employees will be shifted to new jobs, and the company will reduce spending on such things as developer tools, internal tooling and platform feature development.”

ZDNet: Thunderbird e-mail client survives Mozilla layoffs

ZDNet: Thunderbird e-mail client survives Mozilla layoffs. “Recently, Mozilla laid off almost a quarter of its staff. That meant bad news for its flagship Firefox web browser. And some people wondered if this also meant that Thunderbird, Mozilla’s e-mail client with 25 million users, was on its way out. It’s not. Thunderbird is safe.”

Sources: Mozilla extends its Google search deal (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Sources: Mozilla extends its Google search deal. “Mozilla and Google have extended their current search deal for another three years, multiple sources have told ZDNet. The new search deal will ensure Google remains the default search engine provider inside the Firefox browser until 2023 at an estimated price tag of around $400 million to $450 million per year.”

PC World: Mozilla’s paid, unlimited VPN service goes live

PC World: Mozilla’s paid, unlimited VPN service goes live. “Last year, Mozilla began testing the FIrefox Private Network, in its Test Pilot beta network. Today, Mozilla makes it official: the renamed Mozilla VPN is now available for Windows, for $4.99 per month. It rolls out in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Malaysia, and New Zealand today, with plans to expand to other countries this fall.”

BetaNews: Thunderbird 78 unveils major UI changes, restricts add-ons to MailExtension API only

BetaNews: Thunderbird 78 unveils major UI changes, restricts add-ons to MailExtension API only. “Mozilla has released Thunderbird 78.0 for Windows, Mac and Linux. It’s the first major update of the popular open-source email client since August 2019, and is only available as a direct download — existing users of the Thunderbird 68.x series are advised to wait for a future release that will provide an upgrade path.”

VentureBeat: Mozilla Common Voice updates will help train the ‘Hey Firefox’ wakeword for voice-based web browsing

VentureBeat: Mozilla Common Voice updates will help train the ‘Hey Firefox’ wakeword for voice-based web browsing. “Mozilla today released the latest version of Common Voice, its open source collection of transcribed voice data for startups, researchers, and hobbyists to build voice-enabled apps, services, and devices. Common Voice now contains over 7,226 total hours of contributed voice data in 54 different languages, up from 1,400 hours across 18 languages in February 2019.”

BetaNews: Firefox Private Network VPN renamed to Mozilla VPN and priced at $5 per month

BetaNews: Firefox Private Network VPN renamed to Mozilla VPN and priced at $5 per month. “Mozilla is a company that I trust more than some others (I trust no person or company 100 percent, however!) thanks to its respectable data privacy principles. That is why I surf the web with Firefox whenever I can. That company has been beta-testing a VPN service of its own called ‘Firefox Private Network VPN’. Yeah, that name stinks as it is too wordy. Thankfully, the company has wisely decided to rename it to the much cleaner ‘Mozilla VPN.’ In addition, we learn how much the VPN service will eventually cost — $4.99 a month.”

Neowin: Mozilla pushes Firefox 74.0.1 fixing two zero-day exploits

Neowin: Mozilla pushes Firefox 74.0.1 fixing two zero-day exploits. “Mozilla has pushed Firefox 74.0.1 along with the related security advisory. The new update, which users are advised to apply soon, comes with fixes for two critical zero-day vulnerabilities. The new patches are also available for Firefox 68 users with version 68.6.1. Normally, the update will apply automatically, but you can go to the hamburger menu > Help > About Firefox and apply the patch manually.”

Ars Technica: More than 200 browser extensions ejected from Firefox and Chrome stores

Ars Technica: More than 200 browser extensions ejected from Firefox and Chrome stores. “Mozilla and Google are cracking down on malicious and abusive extensions available for the Firefox and Chrome browsers, respectively. The moves come in response to the recent detection of add-ons that turned out to violate the browser maker’s policies, despite review processes designed to weed out wares that are malicious or have the potential to be malicious.”