Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far. “It has been a month since the City of Baltimore’s networks were brought to a standstill by ransomware. On Tuesday, Mayor Bernard ‘Jack’ Young and his cabinet briefed press on the status of the cleanup, which the city’s director of finance has estimated will cost Baltimore $10 million—not including $8 million lost because of deferred or lost revenue while the city was unable to process payments. The recovery remains in its early stages, with less than a third of city employees issued new log-in credentials thus far and many city business functions restricted to paper-based workarounds.”

San Francisco Chronicle: SF DA Gascón launches state’s first website showing prosecution data

San Francisco Chronicle: SF DA Gascón launches state’s first website showing prosecution data. “San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón launched a website Wednesday that provides data on prosecutions, caseloads and trial outcomes — a first-of-its-kind effort by a local prosecuting agency in California. The new website, DA Stat, follows a growing trend among reform-minded law enforcement agencies around the country to increase accountability by releasing raw data and statistics.”

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech. “On Tuesday, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve a ban on the use of facial recognition tech by city agencies, including the police department. The Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance, introduced by San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, is the first ban of its kind for a major American city and the seventh major surveillance oversight effort for a municipality in California.”

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data. “Transportation, meanwhile, emits nearly a third of the nation’s climate-change-causing greenhouse gases. Getting people out of cars and into buses and trains is key to knocking that number down. Trains are great, and Los Angeles’ light rail network—84 miles spreading across the Southland—is the largest in the country. But trains are expensive, and they can’t get everywhere. That’s where buses can come in. Yet at the precise moment when it’s most urgent that cities get people out of their cars, bus systems are struggling. So LA is talking about scrapping the system and starting over, the first radical revamp since rail came back to town. To figure out how to do it right, all the city’s transit planners need is location data from about 5 million cell phones.”

Louisville Kentucky: City, Google Fiber reach agreement providing for restoration of infrastructure affected by Google Fiber construction

Louisville Kentucky: City, Google Fiber reach agreement providing for restoration of infrastructure affected by Google Fiber construction. “Google Fiber will pay $3.84 million to Louisville Metro Government (LMG) to restore roads and other public rights-of-way affected by its departing service in Louisville. Louisville Metro Government and Google Fiber agreed to these payments to fulfill the company’s obligations under its franchise agreement and local regulations, which require restoration of rights-of-way should a service provider end service in Louisville. Citing technical challenges, Google Fiber announced its exit from Louisville in February.”

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles. “Ride-hailing apps have changed the way cities work and now Chicago is allowing the public to take a closer look at those effects. The published datasets include information about Uber, Lyft and Via trips—even listing how much drivers were tipped.”