New York Times: Cities Are Not Only Tackling Covid, But Its Pollution, Too

New York Times: Cities Are Not Only Tackling Covid, But Its Pollution, Too. “P.P.E. litter is fouling landscapes across the globe. Dirtied masks and gloves tumbleweed across city parks, streets and shores in Lima, Toronto, Hong Kong and beyond. Researchers in Nanjing, China, and La Jolla, Calif., recently calculated that 193 countries have generated more than 8 million tons of pandemic-related plastic waste, and the advocacy group OceansAsia estimated that as many as 1.5 billion face masks could wind up in the marine environment in a single year.”

New York Times: An Unexpected Pandemic Consequence Frustrates Florida’s Biggest City

New York Times: An Unexpected Pandemic Consequence Frustrates Florida’s Biggest City. “The disruption to America’s economy created by the coronavirus pandemic has led to mass cancellations of school buses and ferries, to rental car shortages and a bottleneck of cargo ships waiting at seaports. And, in cities like Jacksonville, it has created a small but growing indignity: garbage left out to rot. In the grand scheme of suffering, there are bigger problems. But it has become yet one more example of a public service that most people take for granted but is no longer working right.”

UNC: $2M grant to UNC-Chapel Hill program will rebuild, fortify local economies across North Carolina and beyond

UNC: $2M grant to UNC-Chapel Hill program will rebuild, fortify local economies across North Carolina and beyond. “– Today, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced new programming that will transform economically distressed communities hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on powerful partnerships, the programs will help build resilient local economies with more job opportunities and business growth in North Carolina and across the country.”

Route Fifty: How Cities and Counties Are Prioritizing American Rescue Plan Funds

Route Fifty: How Cities and Counties Are Prioritizing American Rescue Plan Funds. “Infrastructure was the top investment priority for communities of all sizes, followed by replacing lost public sector revenue, according to a report by ICMA. Within the infrastructure category, the most anticipated project concerns were water and sewer infrastructure, prioritized by 74% of respondents.”

Vancouver is Awesome: New database shows Canada’s highest-polluting cities, what needs to change

Vancouver is Awesome: New database shows Canada’s highest-polluting cities, what needs to change. “The Municipal Energy and Emissions Database (MEED) offers near-instant access to the pollution profiles of over 4,000 Canadian towns and cities. With $80,000 in funding from Ottawa, the tool is a creation of Sustainability Solutions Group (SSG) — a cooperative of experts that helps cities plan their way through the climate crisis — and whatIf? Technologies.”

Route Fifty: Why Some Small Towns Are Rejecting Federal Covid Relief Funds

Route Fifty: Why Some Small Towns Are Rejecting Federal Covid Relief Funds. “Congress in March authorized $19.5 billion in aid for cities and towns with fewer than 50,000 residents, including very small jurisdictions such as Bingham. Lawmakers wanted to help every town cover the cost of fighting a pandemic and recovering from last year’s recession. But in some small, rural or conservative towns, local leaders are refusing the cash. They say they don’t need it, and in some cases, don’t feel comfortable accepting it.”

WRAL: NC town accused of hiding discriminatory billing by burying thousands of records in a field

WRAL: NC town accused of hiding discriminatory billing by burying thousands of records in a field. “Some town leaders are suing the town, accusing them of burying the documents to hide a history of racially discriminatory billing practices. Whether or not the town is hiding a dark past, the buried documents pose a security risk, with personal information and even social security numbers clearly visible on the unearthed paper.”

Cities after COVID: Resiliency is about embracing the crisis as part of a new brand story (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Cities after COVID: Resiliency is about embracing the crisis as part of a new brand story. “Cities as we know them are under attack thanks to COVID-19. Their growth, sustainability and ability to attract investment, tourism and talent are extremely vulnerable during times of crisis. In the last hundred years, cities have seen an increase in crises, pandemics and economic pressures—but not all are hit equally.”

Next City: LEARN-ing to Sustain a City’s Culture and Character

Next City: LEARN-ing to Sustain a City’s Culture and Character. “The following is an adapted excerpt of ‘Sustaining a City’s Culture and Character,’ by Charles R. Wolfe with Tigran Haas, published by Rowman & Littlefield. In it, the authors lay out a comprehensive method (heavily dependent on context) for assessing how and why certain places are considered successful, authentic, or unique. As the world, and cities, respond to and grapple with climate change threats, public health crises, and powerful calls for social justice, understanding the through lines that connect a city to its past, to its essence, will be more important than ever.”

CNBC: Some cities are paying people up to $16,000 to move there—this online directory will help you find them

CNBC: Some cities are paying people up to $16,000 to move there—this online directory will help you find them. “MakeMyMove currently lists 37 relocation offers on its pages, some through paid promotions and others for free. Each destination has its own page listing the incentive programs on offer, how much they’re worth, who qualifies and how to apply.”

The Conversation: Why COVID-19 won’t kill cities

The Conversation: Why COVID-19 won’t kill cities. “Restaurants, small businesses and even big brand-name retail chains are closing in record numbers. Mass transit systems, like New York City’s, are warning of severe cuts in service if they don’t get aid soon as state and local tax revenue plunges. Many have fled to rural or suburban areas. And the situation appears likely to only worsen as America endures a ‘dark winter’ with no guarantee of more aid from Congress. Despite these challenges, two scholars who study cities explain why they think urban areas will endure – even if they don’t get the aid from Congress that now seems more likely.”

Shine: Bilingual search engine for city’s rules

Shine: Bilingual search engine for city’s rules. “A bilingual search engine for current rules and regulations in the city was launched by the city’s comprehensive law-based governance commission on Wednesday. It is the first platform of its kind in China, the commission said. The public can access over 500 documents on the platform, called ‘A Collection of Regulations and Rules of Shanghai City,’ in Chinese and English.”