TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech. “On Tuesday, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve a ban on the use of facial recognition tech by city agencies, including the police department. The Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance, introduced by San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, is the first ban of its kind for a major American city and the seventh major surveillance oversight effort for a municipality in California.”

Baltimore Fishbowl: Open Justice Baltimore creates an openly searchable database of Baltimore’s cops

Baltimore Fishbowl: Open Justice Baltimore creates an openly searchable database of Baltimore’s cops. “Data scientist collective Open Justice Baltimore has assembled a new database with information on thousands of city police officers, comprised of data from public records and vetted, crowd-sourced information from the general public. The tool, dubbed BPD Watch, includes the names, badge numbers, salary history, unit assignment, photos (where available) and other details about more than 3,000 individuals employed by the Baltimore Police Department as of late October of 2018.”

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data. “Transportation, meanwhile, emits nearly a third of the nation’s climate-change-causing greenhouse gases. Getting people out of cars and into buses and trains is key to knocking that number down. Trains are great, and Los Angeles’ light rail network—84 miles spreading across the Southland—is the largest in the country. But trains are expensive, and they can’t get everywhere. That’s where buses can come in. Yet at the precise moment when it’s most urgent that cities get people out of their cars, bus systems are struggling. So LA is talking about scrapping the system and starting over, the first radical revamp since rail came back to town. To figure out how to do it right, all the city’s transit planners need is location data from about 5 million cell phones.”

Report: 26 States Now Ban or Restrict Community Broadband (Motherboard)

Motherboard: Report: 26 States Now Ban or Restrict Community Broadband. “A new report has found that 26 states now either restrict or outright prohibit towns and cities from building their own broadband networks. Quite often the laws are directly written by the telecom sector, and in some instances ban towns and cities from building their own broadband networks—even if the local ISP refuses to provide service.”

Louisville Kentucky: City, Google Fiber reach agreement providing for restoration of infrastructure affected by Google Fiber construction

Louisville Kentucky: City, Google Fiber reach agreement providing for restoration of infrastructure affected by Google Fiber construction. “Google Fiber will pay $3.84 million to Louisville Metro Government (LMG) to restore roads and other public rights-of-way affected by its departing service in Louisville. Louisville Metro Government and Google Fiber agreed to these payments to fulfill the company’s obligations under its franchise agreement and local regulations, which require restoration of rights-of-way should a service provider end service in Louisville. Citing technical challenges, Google Fiber announced its exit from Louisville in February.”

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles

Curbed Chicago: Chicago first city to publish data on ride-hailing trips, drivers, and vehicles. “Ride-hailing apps have changed the way cities work and now Chicago is allowing the public to take a closer look at those effects. The published datasets include information about Uber, Lyft and Via trips—even listing how much drivers were tipped.”

Picture this: thousands of Edmonton historical photos online (CBC)

CBC: Picture this: thousands of Edmonton historical photos online. “Last October the City of Edmonton Archives launched a new website and began transferring selected black and while images from its massive collection onto the new system. So far, [Tim] O’Grady and the team have managed to upload more than half of their target of 50,000 photos.”