‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America. “…as the project’s new website explains, more than 200 teen journalists across the country last summer began researching and writing the life stories of young Americans — from newborns to 18-year-olds — who were killed during a year in this country. Their stories start on Feb. 14, 2018, the day a gunman walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and killed 17 people, 14 of them students. Those young people were not the only ones to die in America from guns that day.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state. “There are more than 400 cold cases throughout Utah — unsolved homicides, reports of missing persons or unidentified bodies. Last year, lawmakers passed a bill that requires all law-enforcement agencies to share information on unsolved missing persons and homicide cases that are more than 3 years old. The goal is to help police share information and make connections between cases that are being investigated by different agencies.” Part of the database will be available to the public.

The Verge: When Influencing Becomes Deadly

The Verge: When Influencing Becomes Deadly. “Among one of Tara Fares’ final Instagram posts, which garnered tens of thousands of likes when it was uploaded back in June, is a photo of the Iraqi influencer leaning against her white Porsche convertible. ‘They don’t wanna see u win,’ it says, with Fares posing into the wind, the shadow of her photographer visible in the ‘golden hour’ light. Save for the Iraqi license plate, the photo could easily have been taken in LA, where any number of young women pose in front of convertibles at sunset for Instagram on a given day. But Fares took that photo in Baghdad. She was murdered — shot three times — in the same white convertible, around sunset, three months later.”

Wired: How WhatsApp Fuels Fake News and Violence in India

Wired: How WhatsApp Fuels Fake News and Violence in India. “The five male victims in Rainpada were part of a string of killings that took place over the late spring and summer linked to messages spread on WhatsApp, the Facebook-owned encrypted messaging platform. Police and government officials estimate that more than two dozen people have been killed by mobs, though no official tally is being kept. IndiaSpend, a data journalism outlet, pegs the figure at 33 killed in 69 incidents of mob violence between January 2017 and July 2018.”

New York Times: New Zealand Rebukes Google for Airing Name of Suspect in Backpacker’s Killing

New York Times: New Zealand Rebukes Google for Airing Name of Suspect in Backpacker’s Killing. “The New Zealand government admonished Google on Friday for disclosing the identity of a man charged with killing a female British backpacker, highlighting the tension that arises when local courts order the suppression of information that can be easily found online.”

Phys .org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets

Phys. org: ‘Murder map’ reveals medieval London’s meanest streets. “Stabbed by a lover with a fish-gutting knife. Beaten to death for littering with eel skins. Shot with an arrow during a student street brawl. Shanked by a sore loser after late-night backgammon. These were just some of the ways to die violently in the city of London during the 14th century, as catalogued in the ‘Coroners’ Rolls’: the records of the medieval official tasked with documenting sudden and unnatural death – whether accident, suicide or homicide. Now, University of Cambridge criminologist Professor Manuel Eisner has plotted all cases of murder from the surviving rolls – covering the years 1300 to 1340 – onto a digital map of the old city to show for the first time the ‘hot spots’ of lethal violence in medieval London.”