The Next Web: Europe’s first Museum of Digital Art closes permanently due to coronavirus

The Next Web: Europe’s first Museum of Digital Art closes permanently due to coronavirus. “It’s sad times. Severely hit by the coronavirus pandemic, Europe’s first physical museum dedicated to digital arts, the Museum of Digital Art in Zurich, has revealed it will close for good at the end of July.”

Evening Express: Aberdeen University shows off its assets with online #BestMuseumBum battle

Evening Express: Aberdeen University shows off its assets with online #BestMuseumBum battle. “Staff Aberdeen University have polished their bums for an online museum battle. Started by Yorkshire Museum, today’s curator is calling on museums to showcase the best bums and bottoms from their collection. Starting the campaign was an image of a Roman marble statuette depicting ‘an athlete at the peak of fitness’.”

Institute of Museum and Library Services: Mellon Foundation Invests $1.5 Million in Federal COVID-19 Research Project to Support Libraries, Museums Reopening

Institute of Museum and Library Services: Mellon Foundation Invests $1.5 Million in Federal COVID-19 Research Project to Support Libraries, Museums Reopening. “The Institute of Museum and Library Services today announced the receipt of a $1,500,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support materials research for collections care and the reopening of libraries and museums during the COVID-19 pandemic. As libraries and museums around the country begin to resume operations and reopen to the public, the need for clear information to support the handling of core museum, library, and archival materials has become increasingly urgent.”

Coronavirus: Cinemas and museums set to reopen in England from 4 July (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Cinemas and museums set to reopen in England from 4 July. “Cinemas, museums and galleries will be able to reopen in England from 4 July, Boris Johnson is expected to announce on Tuesday as he outlines a further easing of coronavirus restrictions. Venues closed since the middle of March will be able to welcome visitors as long as safety measures are in place.”

Progress-Index: Pamplin Park’s archives go digital

Progress-Index: Pamplin Park’s archives go digital. “The core of the Pamplin Historical Park archives is the famed Wiley Sword Collection which ranges from personal letters to general orders. Wiley Sword was the author of several Civil War histories and awarded the Fletcher Pratt Prize for the best book of Civil War history. He was also nominated for the Pulitzer, Parkman, Bancroft, and Western Heritage prizes before passing away. Sword had spent his lifetime building this collection for use in his own research and writing.”

AP: Hands Off! Halls of fame adapt to coronavirus concerns

AP: Hands Off! Halls of fame adapt to coronavirus concerns. “As part of a $22 million, court-to-dome renovation, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame replaced the static plaques honoring inductees with touch screens that display videos and career highlights. Another exhibit allows visitors to put their hands inside an impression of Kevin Durant’s, to compare sizes. That was before a pandemic turned hands-on into ‘Hands Off!'”

The Art Newspaper: Museum world rallies behind curator investigated for tweets on how to damage bronze statues

The Art Newspaper: Museum world rallies behind curator investigated for tweets on how to damage bronze statues. “UK arts professionals are voicing support for Madeline Odent, a curator at the Royston and District Museum and Art Gallery in Hertfordshire, who sparked controversy after discussing on social media substances that could be used to damage bronze statues. Odent posted a series of tweets to her personal account after Black Lives Matter demonstrators toppled a statue of slave trader Edward Colston in Bristol and historic statues worldwide come under scrutiny.”

Apollo Magazine: The virtues – and vices – of virtual museum tours

Apollo Magazine: The virtues – and vices – of virtual museum tours . “The recent fetishisation of ‘experiences’, the consumption of places rather than of things, has led to some museums privileging their buildings over their collections, and this tendency is borne out in the priorities of many virtual museums. It is nearly 50 years since John Berger popularised Walter Benjamin’s description of the aura of artworks in his television series Ways of Seeing, positing that the loss of a sense of place and time was the greatest failure of photographic reproductions. Though virtual tours offer a unique experience – an encounter with an object in the place it happens to be – their efforts to share a sense of place and time with visitors sometimes risk eclipsing the object entirely.”

Sightlines: As Austin museums react to the Black Lives Matter movement, bigger issues emerge

Sightlines: As Austin museums react to the Black Lives Matter movement, bigger issues emerge. “After the #BlackoutTuesday campaign kicked off a social media frenzy, many cultural institutions and museums reacted to pressure from protestors on social media to release public statements of solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. It prompted national museum leaders to react. ‘As a community, I do not think art museums have done enough,’ wrote Chris Anagnos executive director of Association of Art Museum Directors, in a statement issued June 1. ‘We have dabbled around the edges of the work, but in our place of privilege we will never live up to the statement that “museums are for everyone” unless we begin to confront, examine and dismantle the various structures that brought us to this point.'”

ArtNet News: In a Post-COVID World, What Museums Do Outside Their Walls Will Become as Important as What They Put on Them

ArtNet News: In a Post-COVID World, What Museums Do Outside Their Walls Will Become as Important as What They Put on Them. “That this sector attracts 2.5 times the population of the US each year is remarkable in itself. But the economic impact of museums extends far beyond what happens inside their buildings. Collectively, according to a 2017 report from the American Alliance of Museums, these organizations contribute more than $50 billion to the GDP, generate $12 billion in tax revenue, and produce over 725,000 jobs—double that of the professional sports industry. In the wake of COVID-19, the size and impact of this economic footprint means that the health and vibrancy of our cities and communities is closely tied to the fate of museums.”

FAD Magazine: World’s first virtual museum VOMA to launch next month – with your help

FAD Magazine: World’s first virtual museum VOMA to launch next month – with your help. “VOMA – the Virtual Online Museum of Art – is the world’s first virtual museum. Opening next month, it will present exquisitely curated exhibitions to feature seminal works on loan from major institutions around the world, alongside those by our most celebrated contemporary artists.”

Evening Standard: Charles Dickens’s earliest surviving letter and handwritten fragment of Oliver Twist on show as museum goes online

Evening Standard: Charles Dickens’s earliest surviving letter and handwritten fragment of Oliver Twist on show as museum goes online. “A fragment of the original Oliver Twist manuscript and its author’s earliest surviving letter have been added to the Charles Dickens Museum’s brand new online collection. The items are among more than 100,000 to be added to the database, which will allow visitors to inspect aspects of the writer’s home, life and work in close detail.”

Philippine Star: This is how some heritage sites are coping amid COVID-19 pandemic

Philippine Star: This is how some heritage sites are coping amid COVID-19 pandemic. “On National Heritage Month, some heritage sites shared how they are adapting amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The Department of Tourism last Thursday hosted its 16th webinar titled ‘Paraparaan: Redefining the Use of Heritage Places for Covid-19 Survival’ where participants discussed how the COVID-19’s impact would reshape tourism, sustainability and conservation programs at the country’s heritage sites under the so-called ‘new normal.'”